Tag Archives: World War I

Navy Kicks Off Year-Long Celebration of Navy Reserve Centennial

Navy Kicks Off Year-Long Celebration of Navy Reserve Centennial

Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert, Chief of Navy Reserve Vice Adm. Robin Braun, Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Manpower and Reserve Affairs Juan Garcia and Navy Reserve Force Master Chief C.J. Mitchell cut a ribbon in front of the new Centennial of the U.S. Navy Reserve display in the Pentagon on March 2, 2015. US Navy Photo

Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert, Chief of Navy Reserve Vice Adm. Robin Braun, Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Manpower and Reserve Affairs Juan Garcia and Navy Reserve Force Master Chief C.J. Mitchell cut a ribbon in front of the new Centennial of the U.S. Navy Reserve display in the Pentagon on March 2, 2015. US Navy Photo

In a ceremony at the Pentagon on Monday, Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert and Chief of Navy Reserve Vice Adm. Robin Braun began a year-long celebration of the U.S. Navy Reserve on its centennial. Read More

At Sea in the Great War: A Coast Guardsman’s Letters Home

At Sea in the Great War: A Coast Guardsman’s Letters Home

You may send my new camera to me, without the tripod, as I am allowed to use it.” So wrote Frederick Richard Foulkes in a letter home on 17 April 1917, just four days after enlisting in the U.S. Coast Guard. Seaman Foulkes, the son of a Presbyterian minister, very quickly had acquired the nickname “Parson.”

When the United States declared war on Germany on 6 April 1917, the Coast Guard had been transferred from the Treasury Department to the Navy Department. Veteran crews were augmented with fresh recruits; Foulkes was assigned to the cutter Manning . A small warship by today’s standards, she was 205 feet long and displaced 1,155 tons. Commissioned on 8 January 1898, the Manning was a veteran of the Spanish-American War, one of the last class of U.S. revenue cutters rigged for sail, and the first to carry electric generators.

Powered by one steam engine, she could attain 17 knots and boasted two 3-inch gun mounts and two 6-pounder rapid-fire guns. Filled out to a full complement of 8 officers, 4 warrant officers, and 100 crew, the Manning was deployed to Gibraltar. She escorted her first convoy out through the danger zone, some 215 miles, on 19 September 1917.

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