Tag Archives: Iwo Jima

Pilot Program Forges Bonds Between Marines and U.S. Special Operations Forces

Pilot Program Forges Bonds Between Marines and U.S. Special Operations Forces

A U.S. Marine with Weapons Company, Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 1st Marines, 11th Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), watches 81mm illumination mortar rounds fall during a joint mortar range with Royal Saudi Naval Forces Marines. US Marine Corps Photo

A U.S. Marine with Weapons Company, Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 1st Marines, 11th Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), watches 81mm illumination mortar rounds fall during a joint mortar range with Royal Saudi Naval Forces Marines. US Marine Corps Photo

CAMP PENDLETON, CALIF. — A small six man U.S. special operations team embedded with the 2,200-member 11th Marine Expeditionary Unit during its recent deployment to the Middle East region to give the MEU a tighter link to the wider special operations community, 11th MEU commander told reporters on Monday. Read More

Iwo Jima at 70: The Most Reproduced and Parodied Photo in History?

Iwo Jima at 70: The Most Reproduced and Parodied Photo in History?

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Photographer Joe Rosenthal admitted that when he took a shot of five Marines and one Navy corpsman raising the U.S. flag on Iwo Jima’s Mt. Suribachi on Feb. 23, 1945, he had no idea that he had captured something extraordinary. He was setting up for a different shot when he spotted the group of men planting the flag and quickly took a snap without even looking through the viewfinder. The chance photo would become iconic overnight and go on to win the Pulitzer Prize.

“Raising the Flag on Iwo Jima” is often cited as being the most reproduced photograph in history. It is also probably the most parodied image in the world. The “Iwo Jima pose” has become a popular symbol for organizations or movements wishing to convey victory, teamwork, or patriotism. The use of the image has ranged from respectful homage to what some consider offensive misappropriation. Read More

Iwo Jima at 70: To Love a Lost Hero

Iwo Jima at 70: To Love a Lost Hero

The following is a remembrance of World War II Medal of Honor recipient Marine 1st Lt. Jack Lummus. The piece appeared in Naval History in 1995 to mark the 50th anniversary of the Battle of Iwo Jima with the original title, “To Love a Lost Hero.” Before the war, Lummus had played in the National Football League for the New York Giants and had played college ball at Baylor. Read More