Tag Archives: Huntington Ingalls

Carrier Theodore Roosevelt Rejoins the Fleet

Carrier Theodore Roosevelt Rejoins the Fleet

USS Theodore Roosevelt CVN-71 returns to Naval Station Norfolk, Va. from Sea Trials on Aug. 29, 2013. US Navy Photo

USS Theodore Roosevelt CVN-71 returns to Naval Station Norfolk, Va. from Sea Trials on Aug. 29, 2013. US Navy Photo

The Nimitz-class carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) has completed a complex upgrade and refueling that will extend the life of the ship another 23 years, the Navy announced on Thursday. Read More

Navy’s Steel Deckhouse Decision for Final Zumwalt is a Blow to HII

Navy’s Steel Deckhouse Decision for Final Zumwalt is a Blow to HII

The 1,000-ton deckhouse of the future destroyer USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) is craned toward the deck of the ship to be integrated with the ship's hull at General Dynamics Bath Iron Works on Dec. 14, 2012. US Navy Photo

The 1,000-ton deckhouse of the future destroyer USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) is craned toward the deck of the ship to be integrated with the ship’s hull at General Dynamics Bath Iron Works on Dec. 14, 2012. US Navy Photo

The future of Huntington Ingalls Industries’ composite manufacturing facility in Gulfport, Miss. is in question following a decision by the U.S. Navy to build the deckhouse for the third Zumwalt-class destroyer (DDG-1000) from steel instead of composites. Read More

NAVSEA: USS Anchorage Completes Final Contractor Trials

NAVSEA: USS Anchorage Completes Final Contractor Trials

USS Anchorage (LPD 23) moored at the Port of Anchorage, Alaska on May 3, 2013.

USS Anchorage (LPD-23) moored at the Port of Anchorage, Alaska on May 3, 2013.

The latest San Antonio-class amphibious warship (LPD-17) has completed its final round of contractor trials, Naval Sea Systems Command announced last week.

USS Anchorage (LPD-23) completed its final contractor trial in July, overseen by the U.S. Navy’s Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV). The most recent test of the ship’s systems are the last review while the ship is still under warranty from shipbuilder Huntington Ingalls Industries. Read More

The Heart of the Navy's Next Destroyer

The Heart of the Navy’s Next Destroyer

The Aegis-class destroyer USS Hopper (DDG-70) launches a standard missile (SM) 3 Blk IA in July 2009. US Navy Photo

The Aegis-class destroyer USS Hopper (DDG-70) launches a standard missile (SM) 3 Blk IA in July 2009. US Navy Photo

When the first new Flight III Arleigh Burke-class destroyer enters service with the U.S. Navy in 2019, it will be equipped with a new radar roughly 30 times more powerful than the long-serving Lockheed Martin SPY-1 system found on current Aegis warships. Called the air and missile defense radar (AMDR), the new sensor is expected to exponentially increase the ship’s performance in simultaneously defending the Fleet against both air-breathing and ballistic-missile threats. The key technology that enables such high performance is a semiconductor called gallium nitride (GaN).

“It is definitely one of the key enabling technologies,” said Captain Douglas Small, Naval Sea Systems Command’s AMDR program manager, during an interview with USNI News. “We’re basically in the Flight III going to deliver over 30 times the radar capability for about twice the input power.” Read More

Navy Awards $6.1 Billion in Nine Destroyer Deal

Navy Awards $6.1 Billion in Nine Destroyer Deal

USS Michael Murphy (DDG 112) is moored at its homeport at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam. US Navy Photo

USS Michael Murphy (DDG-112) is moored at its homeport at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam. US Navy Photo

The Navy has awarded $6.1 billion in contracts to Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII) and General Dynamic Bath Iron Works (BIW) for nine Arleigh Burke–class guided missile destroyers (DDG-51) to be purchased between Fiscal Years 2013 to 2017 in a massive multi-year shipbuilding deal, Naval Sea Systems Command told USNI News on Monday.

The contract award has HII building five of the hulls for $3.3 billion and BIW four for $2.8 billion. The multi–year deal — starting with future ships Paul Ignatius (DDG-117) and Daniel Inouye (DDG-118) — includes an option for a tenth DDG-51 if the Navy can overcome a sequestration funding challenge. The extra ship would likely be built in 2014 by BIW, NAVSEA said. Read More

Zumwalt Deckhouse Decision to Come Later This Year

Zumwalt Deckhouse Decision to Come Later This Year

The deckhouse of the future destroyer USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) is craned toward the deck of the ship to be integrated with the ship's hull at General Dynamics Bath Iron Works. US Navy Photo

The deckhouse of the future destroyer USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) is craned toward the deck of the ship to be integrated with the ship’s hull at General Dynamics Bath Iron Works. US Navy Photo

Naval Sea Systems Command will decide if the third Zumwalt-class DDG-1000 will have a steel or composite deck house by the end of the year, NAVSEA officials told USNI News on Tuesday. Read More

Interview: A Future for Avondale

Interview: A Future for Avondale

Avondale Shipyard in New Orleans. The yard historically built amphibious ships for the U.S. Navy. Owners are now exploring using the yard for manufacturing oil and gas infrastructure. Google Photo Avondale Shipyard in New Orleans. The yard historically built amphibious ships for the U.S. Navy. Owners are now exploring using the yard for manufacturing oil and gas infrastructure. Google Photo

Avondale Shipyards, in continuous operation since 1938, is best known in recent years for constructing Navy amphibious ships, including the Whidbey Island (LSD-41) class and the San Antonio (LPD-17) class. The yard was one of three spun off by Northrop Grumman to form Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII) in 2011. The company announced it would close the yard in 2013 at the completion of the last LPD scheduled there. At its height the yard employed 6,000; currently there are about 2,200 workers.In December, however, CEO Mike Petters announced HII was exploring use of the yard for the construction of oil and liquified natural gas (LNG) infrastructure around the Gulf Coast.
USNI News spoke with Christopher D. Kastner, HII’s corporate vice president and general manager–corporate development, about the future of the yard, its workforce, and what it means for the U.S. Navy.
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HII CEO Mike Petters Talks Business

HII CEO Mike Petters Talks Business

Mike Petters has been the chief executive officer of Huntington Ingalls Industries since the shipbuilder was spun off from Northrop Grumman in 2011. On Thursday, Petters briefed reporters in the state of the company almost 18 months after the spin-off.

It was our first full year as a public company. We spun off in 2011 from Northrop and we did that in the end of March. We really had three quarters in 2011, but last year was the first full calendar year. As a public company there are lots of things you are doing that you weren’t doing before that you do for the very first time. There are lots of things that were done by other people before you became public. And our team did a very credible job working its way through that and we’re at the point where we’re doing it again. . . . We did that in an environment where there’s more than usual uncertainty in the economy, the business environment, and politically. . . . You couldn’t go a day without hearing someone talk about the level of uncertainty in the business climate.

petters_hiresFor businesses in that environment it was a turbulent year. Usually aerospace and defense companies tend to be a little bit insulated from that kind of discussion. But I think the Budget Control Act of 2011 put defense contractors front-and-center in that conversation in a way that we were not before. I think as the year played out you saw different companies react to that in different ways. For us the issues were to pay close attention to our own knitting. When we spun the business from Northrop Grumman we said we have five contracts that we have to negotiate. We have five ships that we have to deliver that are troubled ships. It’s going to take us a couple of years to get those ships out of the way.

I’m happy to tell you that three of those five ships have been delivered. In 2012 we delivered LPD-23 and -24. LPD-22 was delivered at the very end of 2011. We still have two ships to deliver this year, LPD-25 and LHA-6. . . . Getting those ships delivered has been our focus. . . . We have to finish those two ships and get them delivered. In that regard execution and operations have been continuing to steadily improve. On LPD-25 and LHA-6 we had quality launches last year.

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