Tag Archives: Vice Adm. Tom Moore

Navy May Reduce LCS-2 Drydocking Requirements as Drydock Shortage Looms

Navy May Reduce LCS-2 Drydocking Requirements as Drydock Shortage Looms

USS Montgomery (LCS-8) enters dry dock for Post Shakedown Availability (PSA) at BAE Systems Ship Repair facility. US Navy Photo

WASHINGTON, D.C. — The Navy may not continue to put its Independence-variant Littoral Combat Ships into the drydock every time they go into planned maintenance, as one way of dealing with a looming shortfall in drydock availability and private sector maintenance capacity. Read More

Navy Could Extend Life of Amphibs to 50 Years,  LCS for 35, If Navy Invests in their Upkeep

Navy Could Extend Life of Amphibs to 50 Years, LCS for 35, If Navy Invests in their Upkeep

The Whidbey Island-class amphibious dock landing ship USS Rushmore (LSD 47), foreground, the Wasp-class amphibious assault ship USS Essex (LHD 2), middle, and the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer Wayne E. Meyer (DDG 108) transit the Pacific Ocean during Dawn Blitz 2017. US Navy photo.

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The Navy could keep its amphibious ships in service for more than 50 years and its Littoral Combat Ships for up to 35 years, as the service looks for ways to increase the size of the fleet in the nearer term by extending the life of today’s ships, according to Naval Sea Systems Command. Read More

NAVSEA: Navy Ships Using 23 Different Steering Control Systems; Simpler Systems Needed

NAVSEA: Navy Ships Using 23 Different Steering Control Systems; Simpler Systems Needed

Seaman Jonathon Espinozalopez, left, and Seaman Jeffrey Boekeloo, right, drive the ship from the bridge of the amphibious assault ship USS Iwo Jima (LHD-7) as it departs Naval Station Mayport on Feb. 7, 2018. US Navy Photo

WASHINGTON, D.C. — When watchstanders on USS John S. McCain (DDG-56) lost control of the ship’s steering and collided with a merchant ship last summer, they were using one of 23 steering control systems found in the fleet today, and not one that they were trained to use. Read More

Attack Sub Maintenance at Private Yards Running Behind; NAVSEA Hopes to See Timely Delivery if More Work Given to Them

Attack Sub Maintenance at Private Yards Running Behind; NAVSEA Hopes to See Timely Delivery if More Work Given to Them

USS Greeneville (SSN-772) sits atop blocks in Dry Dock #1 at the Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, on Feb. 21, 2001. The Los Angeles class attack submarine is dry-docked to assess the damage and perform necessary repairs following a Feb. 9 collision at sea with the Japanese fishing vessel Ehime Maru off the coast of Honolulu, Hawaii. DoD Photo

CAPITOL HILL – Two attack submarines sent to private shipyards for routine maintenance availabilities are running a few months behind schedule. But the Navy hopes that using these new-construction yards for sub-maintenance on a regular basis will help them become reliable providers of on-time maintenance. Read More

Navy Plans to Spend $21B Over 20 Years to Optimize, Modernize Public Shipyards

Navy Plans to Spend $21B Over 20 Years to Optimize, Modernize Public Shipyards

The Los Angeles-class attack submarine USS Helena (SSN 725) arrives at Norfolk Naval Shipyard in August 2015 for a high-priority docking continuous maintenance availability. US Navy photo.

CAPITOL HILL – The Navy will execute a $21-billion, 20-year public shipyard optimization plan as a series of small projects that can be done even as maintenance work on submarines and aircraft carriers continues at the yards, the assistant secretary of the Navy for research, development and acquisition told senators today. Read More

NAVSEA: FY 2019 Navy Budget Request Will Include More Shipbuilding, Life Extensions to Help Grow Fleet

NAVSEA: FY 2019 Navy Budget Request Will Include More Shipbuilding, Life Extensions to Help Grow Fleet

The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyers USS Mustin (DDG 89), USS McCampbell (DDG 85), and USS Barry (DDG 52) maneuver near the USS Stethem (DDG 63) during a surface exercise in waters south of Japan on Feb. 27, 2017. The destroyers eventually sailed to Guam to participate in the Multisail 2017 exercise with Japanese forces. US Navy Photo

WASHINGTON NAVY YARD – The upcoming Fiscal Year 2019 budget request will begin to reveal the Navy’s plans for building up the fleet – both through new shipbuilding investments and through a plan to keep current surface ships in service longer, the head of Naval Sea Systems Command told USNI News in an interview. Read More

NAVSEA Looking to Supplement Public Shipyard Work with More Private Yards

NAVSEA Looking to Supplement Public Shipyard Work with More Private Yards

The aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) departs Norfolk Naval Shipyard (NNSY) on July 21, 2017 — one day early — following a 10-month planned incremental availability. Harry S. Truman will conduct sea trials and return to its homeport at Naval Station Norfolk. US Navy Photo

WASHINGTON NAVY YARD – The Navy will rely more on private industry to help with aircraft carrier and submarine maintenance work at public shipyards, as the service seeks to keep up with growing maintenance needs and awaits a much-needed public shipyard renovation effort. Read More

CVN-80 Eyed For Accelerated Contracting Pilot Program, Potential 2-Carrier Buy

CVN-80 Eyed For Accelerated Contracting Pilot Program, Potential 2-Carrier Buy

Newport News Shipbuilding cut a 35-ton steel plate to kick off advance construction of the aircraft carrier Enterprise (CVN 80) on Aug. 24, 2017. Ship’s sponsors and U.S. Olympic gold medalists Simone Biles (left) and Katie Ledecky (center), along with Newport News Shipbuilding President Jennifer Boykin (right), signed the steel that will become part of Enterprise’s foundation. Newport News Shipbuilding photo.

The upcoming contract award for the future aircraft carrier Enterprise (CVN-80) will be part of a Defense Department pilot program to award major contracts faster, and Navy leadership is eyeing it as an opportunity to save money by buying two carriers instead of one. Read More

Shipbuilders Still Awaiting Details of 355-Ship Fleet Buildup Plans 1 Year Later; Yards Won't Make Investments Without Firmer Signals from the Navy

Shipbuilders Still Awaiting Details of 355-Ship Fleet Buildup Plans 1 Year Later; Yards Won’t Make Investments Without Firmer Signals from the Navy

It’s been a year since the Navy declared it needed a 355-ship Navy to meet its global requirements going forward – outlining a potential future fleet with nearly 40 percent more attack submarines, 30 percent more small surface combatants, nearly 20 percent more large surface combatants and an additional aircraft carrier. Read More