Tag Archives: Vice Adm. Bill Merz

Navy, Industry Discussing Feasibility of Common Hull for Support Ships

Navy, Industry Discussing Feasibility of Common Hull for Support Ships

USS Spruance (DDG 111), the Military Sealift Command (MSC) ammunition and cargo ship USNS Washington Chambers (T-AKE 11), the guided-missile destroyer USS Decatur (DDG 73), the amphibious assault ship USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6), the Military Sealift Command (MSC) fleet oiler USNS Walter S. Diehl (T-AO 193) and the amphibious dock landing ship USS Germantown (LSD 42) steam in formation in the South China Sea Sea, Oct. 13, 2016. U.S. Navy Photo

CAPITOL HILL – Navy officials like the potential costs savings of using one hull design for the service’s family of support ships and are talking with industry leaders early and often to make this plan feasible.

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Navy Wants Alternative Funding for Columbia SSBNs to Accelerate 355-Ship Fleet

Navy Wants Alternative Funding for Columbia SSBNs to Accelerate 355-Ship Fleet

Newport News Shipbuilding placed a 900-ton superlift into dry dock, continuing construction of the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier John F. Kennedy (CVN 79). Nearly 90 lifts have been placed in the dock and joined together since the ship’s keel was laid in August 2015. Newport News Shipbuilding photo.

CAPITOL HILL – The Navy continues to push for the upcoming Columbia-class ballistic-missile submarine program to be funded outside the normal shipbuilding budget, as opportunities exist to reach a 355-ship fleet faster but the $100-billion SSBN program looms over the next 15 years of spending. Read More

New Authorities Helping Navy Save Money on New Weapons; Sustainment Costs Still an Issue

New Authorities Helping Navy Save Money on New Weapons; Sustainment Costs Still an Issue

Aviation Machinist’s Mate 2nd Class Alexandra Mimbela performs maintenance on an F/A-18F Super Hornet. US Navy Photo

ARLINGTON, Va. – The Navy is exploring how new acquisition authorities may help save money when buying weapons, but the service still needs to find ways to control long-term sustainment and modernization costs throughout the long lives of these systems, a panel said this week.

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Navy Could Extend Life of Amphibs to 50 Years,  LCS for 35, If Navy Invests in their Upkeep

Navy Could Extend Life of Amphibs to 50 Years, LCS for 35, If Navy Invests in their Upkeep

The Whidbey Island-class amphibious dock landing ship USS Rushmore (LSD 47), foreground, the Wasp-class amphibious assault ship USS Essex (LHD 2), middle, and the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer Wayne E. Meyer (DDG 108) transit the Pacific Ocean during Dawn Blitz 2017. US Navy photo.

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The Navy could keep its amphibious ships in service for more than 50 years and its Littoral Combat Ships for up to 35 years, as the service looks for ways to increase the size of the fleet in the nearer term by extending the life of today’s ships, according to Naval Sea Systems Command. Read More

Navy Will Extend All DDGs to a 45-Year Service Life; 'No Destroyer Left Behind' Officials Say

Navy Will Extend All DDGs to a 45-Year Service Life; ‘No Destroyer Left Behind’ Officials Say

USS Preble (DDG-88), USS Halsey (DDG-97) and USS Sampson (DDG-102) were underway behind the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) in March. US Navy Photo

This post has been updated to include additional information from the hearing.

CAPITOL HILL – The Navy will keep every one of its Arleigh Burke-class destroyers in service for 45 years, extending the life of the entire class. The move allows the Navy to reach a 355-ship fleet by 2036 or 2037, the deputy chief of naval operations for warfare systems said on Thursday. Read More

Navy Prioritizes Boosting Capability Above Growing Fleet Capacity; Stresses Innovation

Navy Prioritizes Boosting Capability Above Growing Fleet Capacity; Stresses Innovation

Sailors aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Winston S. Churchill (DDG-81) on April 6, 2018. US Navy Photo

NATIONAL HARBOR, Md. – The Navy is emphasizing the development of technologies that can rapidly increase the capability of today’s force, but they are finding this drive for innovation must also come with enough structure to keep high-risk and high-reward programs on track.

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