Tag Archives: MARAD

Lawmakers Question MARAD on Sealift Readiness

Lawmakers Question MARAD on Sealift Readiness

RRF vessel SS Cornhusker State off the coast of Haiti, February 2010. MARAD Photo

Lawmakers were skeptical the Navy could meet its sealift requirements as part of the National Defense Strategy and that the service was on track to recapitalize its aging sealift fleet. Read More

Wittman Pushing Navy to Buy Used Cargo Ships

Wittman Pushing Navy to Buy Used Cargo Ships

A fleet of military vehicles wait pier side in preparation of Exercise Saber Strike 16 in Riga, Latvia, June 4, 2016. The vehicles were transported by a British Roll-On, Roll-Off ship from Norway for the exercise. US Marine Corps photo.

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Rep. Rob Wittman (R-Va.) wants to know why the U.S. military’s surge sealift capability has yet to augment its aging fleet’s capabilities with used cargo ships. Read More

MARAD: National Military Sealift Strategy Expected Soon

MARAD: National Military Sealift Strategy Expected Soon

The Military Sealift Command maritime prepositioning ship USNS Sgt. William R. Button (T-AK 3012) is moored off the coast of Latvia for the Saber Strike 17 Maritime Prepositioning Force offload operations on May, 25, 2017. US Navy photo.

WASHINGTON, D.C. — A National Maritime Strategy, expected to address the various deficiencies facing the nation’s sealift capacity, is finished and awaiting final approval, a top sealift official said last week.

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Report: U.S. Sealift Lacks Personnel, Hulls, National Strategy

Report: U.S. Sealift Lacks Personnel, Hulls, National Strategy

A UH-60 Black Hawk is raised from Military Sealift Command’s voyage-charter, general-purpose, heavy-lift vessel MV Ocean Grand at the pier in Sattahip, Thailand, Aug. 17, during an offload of equipment that will be used during exercise Hanuman Guardian 2018. 

An aging and inactive government fleet dependent on a shrinking pool of merchant mariners to get underway is how a new report describes the U.S. military’s strategic sealift capability.

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DoD IG: Inaccurate Military Surge Sealift Fleet Readiness Reporting Undercuts Operational Plans

DoD IG: Inaccurate Military Surge Sealift Fleet Readiness Reporting Undercuts Operational Plans

SATTAHIP, Thailand—A UH-60 Black Hawk is raised from Military Sealift Command’s voyage-charter, general-purpose, heavy-lift vessel MV Ocean Grand at the pier in Sattahip, Thailand, Aug. 17, during an offload of equipment that will be used during exercise Hanuman Guardian 2018. (Courtesy photo/Released)

Inaccurate surge sealift fleet readiness reporting misled geographic combatant commanders about their ability to quickly receive equipment resupplies, according to a Department of Defense Inspector General’s report. Read More

TRANSCOM Stress Test Practiced Cargo Delivery Through Mine- and Sub-Filled Waters

TRANSCOM Stress Test Practiced Cargo Delivery Through Mine- and Sub-Filled Waters

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NORFOLK (Sept. 21, 2019) Military Sealift Command large, medium-speed roll-on/roll-off (LMSR) vessel USNS Benavidez (T-AKR 306), departs Lambert’s Point Shipyard alongside USNS Mendonca (T-AKR 303) for Turbo Activation. Navy photo

Running dark and nearly silent, last month a convoy of Military Sealift Command ships practiced delivering people and gear to the fight as part of a large U.S. Transportation Command surge sealift capability stress test.

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Keeping Up With the Jones Act

Keeping Up With the Jones Act

World War II Merchant Marine recruiting poster.

In the last several weeks, the Jones Act has drawn headlines over how it has shaped the U.S. and worldwide shipping industry. After almost 100 years as a part of federal law, there’s much misunderstanding as to what the law actually does. Read More

Study Says Navy Logistics Fleet Would Fall Short in High-End Fight

Study Says Navy Logistics Fleet Would Fall Short in High-End Fight

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducts a replenishment-at-sea (RAS) with the fast combat support ship USNS Arctic (T-AOE-8) on April 12, 2019

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The Navy is struggling to find support to buy new logistics ships, even as a new study finds the Navy’s current plans to recapitalize that logistics fleet are insufficient to support distributed operations in a high-end fight against China or Russia. Read More