Tag Archives: AV-8B Harrier

AV-8B Harrier That Crashed in North Carolina Being Recovered; Pilot Released from Hospital

AV-8B Harrier That Crashed in North Carolina Being Recovered; Pilot Released from Hospital

A U.S. Marine Corps AV-8B Harrier assigned to Marine Attack Squadron 542 taxis down the flight line during Fjord Fury in Bodo, Norway, June 8, 2018. Exercise Fjord Fury is designed to conduct combined training with NATO allied forces, foster relationships with host and partner nations, and improve the squadron’s combat readiness. US Marine Corps photo.

The AV-8B Harrier that crashed Monday night near Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point in North Carolina is in the early stages of being recovered by a Marine Corps team. Read More

Marine Corps AV-8B Harrier Crashes Outside MCAS Cherry Point; Pilot Safely Ejected

Marine Corps AV-8B Harrier Crashes Outside MCAS Cherry Point; Pilot Safely Ejected

A U.S. Marine Corps AV-8B Harrier conducts an aerial refuel during exercise Bayou Thunder off the coast of Louisiana, Jan. 29, 2019. The purpose of the exercise is to enhance Marine attack Squadron (VMA) 231’s air-to-air and air-to-ground capabilities while also strengthening service interoperability with joint services. The aircraft is assigned to VMA-231, Marine Aircraft Group 14, 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing. US Marine Corps photo.

A Marine Corps AV-8B Harrier crashed in North Carolina, and the pilot is being treated at a local hospital after safely ejecting from the plane, according to the Marine Corps. Read More

Marines Accelerating F-35C Procurement to Support Carrier Deployments; F-35B Buys Would Slow

Marines Accelerating F-35C Procurement to Support Carrier Deployments; F-35B Buys Would Slow

An F-35C Lightning II assigned to the “Argonauts” of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 147 sits chained on the flight deck of the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) on Dec. 9, 2018. US Navy Photo

CAPITOL HILL – The Marine Corps is accelerating its F-35C carrier variant Joint Strike Fighter procurement and slowing its F-35B vertical landing variant to support Navy deployment requirements, the Marines’ top aviator told lawmakers today. Read More

Air Operations in Djibouti Halted, Amphibious Exercise Canceled After 2 Marine Aviation Crashes on April 3

Air Operations in Djibouti Halted, Amphibious Exercise Canceled After 2 Marine Aviation Crashes on April 3

A Marine Corps CH-53E Super Stallion helicopter assigned to Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron (VMM) 162 (Reinforced), lands aboard the Wasp-class amphibious assault ship USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) in Mediterranean Sea during exercise Juniper Cobra 2018. US Marine Corps photo.

This post has been updated to include additional information from U.S. Naval Forces Central Command.

All U.S. military air operations in Djibouti are on hold and an exercise taking place in and around Djibouti has been canceled following two aviation mishaps on Tuesday. Read More

Marine AV-8B Harrier Crashes in Djibouti, Pilot in Stable Condition

Marine AV-8B Harrier Crashes in Djibouti, Pilot in Stable Condition

A U.S. Marine AV-8B Harrier II aircraft assigned to Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron (VMM) 162 (Reinforced) takes off during a Stinger trainer launch simulator aboard the Wasp-class amphibious assault ship USS Iwo Jima (LHD-7) on March 23, 2018. US Marine Corps Photo

This post has been updated to correct the date USS Iwo Jima entered U.S. 5th Fleet. It was March 27, not March 29.

A Marine pilot is in stable condition after an AV-8B Harrier jet crashed during takeoff in Djibouti during an exercise on Tuesday, a U.S. Navy official told USNI News. Read More

Aviation Leaders Still Unsure Why Marines Not Facing Same Hypoxia Issues as Navy, Air Force

Aviation Leaders Still Unsure Why Marines Not Facing Same Hypoxia Issues as Navy, Air Force

F-35A Lightning II aircraft receive aerial refuelings from a Travis KC-10 Extender July 13, 2016 on the flight from England to the United States. US Air Force photo.

WASHINGTON, D.C. — The armed services are still unsure why Navy and Air Force pilots are struggling with their Onboard Oxygen Generation System (OBOGS) while the Marine Corps – which uses the exact same systems – has had no problems, the Marines’ top aviator told reporters. Read More

Marines Would Save $1B If F-35 Entered Service Faster; F-18 Hornets Struggling To Stay Mission-Ready

Marines Would Save $1B If F-35 Entered Service Faster; F-18 Hornets Struggling To Stay Mission-Ready

A U.S. Marine Corps F/A-18C Hornet with Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 232 “Red Devils” departs the runway at Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni, Japan, March 24, 2017. US Marine Corps photo.

WASHINGTON, D.C. — The Marine Corps could save about a billion dollars, reduce risk for pilots seeing too few flight hours each month and bring additional high-end capability to the fleet if the service were able to buy its F-35B and C Joint Strike Fighters at a faster pace, the deputy commandant for aviation said on Tuesday. Read More

Lawmaker Worries Marine Corps Investing Too Heavily In Aviation Over Ground Vehicles

Lawmaker Worries Marine Corps Investing Too Heavily In Aviation Over Ground Vehicles

U.S. Marine Corps pilots maneuver a CH-53K King Stallion as it delivers a 12,000 pound external load after completing a 110 nautical mile mission during the two-week initial operational test (OT-B1) conducted at Sikorsky. Sikorsky photo.

The Marine Corps’ top financial officer told lawmakers that the service considers its modernization programs properly balanced between aviation and ground needs, while acknowledging that there hasn’t been enough money in recent years to buy the ground assets at a proper pace. Read More

Marine Aviation Going After Small Maintenance Issues that Create Big Readiness Problems

Marine Aviation Going After Small Maintenance Issues that Create Big Readiness Problems

U.S. Marine Sgt. Ryan Boele (left), a MV-22 flight line mechanic chief with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 163 (Reinforced), 11th Marine Expeditionary Unit, and Lance Cpl. David Bath (right), a MV-22 flight line mechanic with VMM-163, 11th MEU, adjust cables on an engine of an MV-22 Osprey within the hanger bay of the USS Makin Island (LHD 8) Dec. 27. US Marine Corps photo.

U.S. Marine Sgt. Ryan Boele (left), a MV-22 flight line mechanic chief with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 163 (Reinforced), 11th Marine Expeditionary Unit, and Lance Cpl. David Bath (right), a MV-22 flight line mechanic with VMM-163, 11th MEU, adjust cables on an engine of an MV-22 Osprey within the hanger bay of the USS Makin Island (LHD 8) Dec. 27. US Marine Corps photo.

THE PENTAGON – The Marine Corps is tackling the little problems that combine to create major burdens on the aviation maintenance community, the deputy commandant for aviation told reporters today. Read More