Megan Eckstein

About Megan Eckstein

Megan Eckstein is a staff writer for USNI News. She previously covered Congress for Defense Daily and the U.S. surface navy and U.S. amphibious operations as an associate editor for Inside the Navy.


Recent Posts By the Author


Navy Use of Laser Scanning Already Showing Big Savings; Summit This Month to Refine Plans

Navy Use of Laser Scanning Already Showing Big Savings; Summit This Month to Refine Plans

Lt. Clay Greunke, assigned to Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command (SPAWAR), demonstrates three-dimensional scanning and virtual reality by walking through processed scanned data from the guided-missile destroyer USS Truxtun (DDG 103) [on right] compared to two-dimensional drawings of the ship [on left], on May 26, 2017. The SPAWAR 3D scanning team recently received the 2016 Secretary of the Navy’s innovation award in the category of automated process development for their development of virtual and augmented reality during an official ceremony on June 5, 2017. US Navy photo illustration.

A $50,000 investment in laser scanning equipment saved the Navy nearly $2 million during the planning effort for USS George Washington‘s (CVN-73) refueling and complex overhaul. A small team of engineers with a LIDAR system did the work of the usual 20-person team, inspecting the nooks and crannies of the carrier to inform the overhaul plans.

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Measure to Accelerate Virginia Attack Sub Acquisition Defeated in House Vote

Measure to Accelerate Virginia Attack Sub Acquisition Defeated in House Vote

Virginia-class attack submarine USS North Dakota (SSN-784) arrives at the Trident Refit Facility’s Magnetic Silencing Facility (MSF) in 2017. US Navy Photo

The Navy may have a tougher time negotiating for its next batch of attack submarines after the House voted not to include a measure that would give the service advanced procurement dollars to increase the rate of submarine construction.

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Congress Faces Last Chance to Add 2 Virginia-Class Attack Subs to Next Block Buy

Congress Faces Last Chance to Add 2 Virginia-Class Attack Subs to Next Block Buy

Indiana (SSN-789) was delivered to the U.S. Navy by Newport News Shipbuilding on June 25, 2018. Pictured during sea trials in May, the newest Virginia-class submarine will be commissioned later this year. HII Photo

As some lawmakers hope to leverage industrial base capacity and buy an additional two attack submarines in the coming years, an amendment set for a vote on Thursday will determine if the Navy gets the up-front funding it would need for those additional submarine purchases. Read More

Navy to Field 'Optionally Unmanned' Vessels to Supplement Future Surface Combatant

Navy to Field ‘Optionally Unmanned’ Vessels to Supplement Future Surface Combatant

The Sea Hunter, a Medium Displacement Unmanned Surface Vehicle (MDUSV). US Navy Photo

WASHINGTON, D.C. — The Navy’s Future Surface Combatant will likely include both an unmanned and an optionally unmanned surface vessel as part of a growing family of systems, as the Navy works through how manned/unmanned teaming can provide the biggest benefits at various phases of warfare. Read More

U.S. Surface Combatants Could Get Faster Block Upgrades in the Future

U.S. Surface Combatants Could Get Faster Block Upgrades in the Future

The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Bainbridge (DDG 96) departs Kiel, Germany, following a scheduled port visit, June 21, 2018. US Navy photo.

WASHINGTON, D.C. — The Navy hopes to bring the submarine community’s capability improvement process to its surface combatants, allowing for more continuous upgrades to the ships’ warfighting systems as the class builds out. Read More

Less Experienced Maintainers Contribute to Rise in Naval Aviation Mishaps

Less Experienced Maintainers Contribute to Rise in Naval Aviation Mishaps

An F/A-18F attached to the “Flying Eagles” of Strike Fighter Squadron One Two Two (VFA-122), sits on the line at Naval Air Station (NAS) Lemoore, Calif., in December 2005. U.S. Navy photo.

The Navy and Marine Corps found that less experience in their aviation maintenance crews has contributed to a sharp rise in Class C mishaps – often taking place during aircraft towing or repair work – and are taking steps to reverse this trend. Read More

Navy May Reduce LCS-2 Drydocking Requirements as Drydock Shortage Looms

Navy May Reduce LCS-2 Drydocking Requirements as Drydock Shortage Looms

USS Montgomery (LCS-8) enters dry dock for Post Shakedown Availability (PSA) at BAE Systems Ship Repair facility. US Navy Photo

WASHINGTON, D.C. — The Navy may not continue to put its Independence-variant Littoral Combat Ships into the drydock every time they go into planned maintenance, as one way of dealing with a looming shortfall in drydock availability and private sector maintenance capacity. Read More

Navy Could Extend Life of Amphibs to 50 Years,  LCS for 35, If Navy Invests in their Upkeep

Navy Could Extend Life of Amphibs to 50 Years, LCS for 35, If Navy Invests in their Upkeep

The Whidbey Island-class amphibious dock landing ship USS Rushmore (LSD 47), foreground, the Wasp-class amphibious assault ship USS Essex (LHD 2), middle, and the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer Wayne E. Meyer (DDG 108) transit the Pacific Ocean during Dawn Blitz 2017. US Navy photo.

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The Navy could keep its amphibious ships in service for more than 50 years and its Littoral Combat Ships for up to 35 years, as the service looks for ways to increase the size of the fleet in the nearer term by extending the life of today’s ships, according to Naval Sea Systems Command. Read More