Home » News & Analysis » Navy Aims to Install Over-the-Horizon Missile on Littoral Combat Ship by End of 2016


Navy Aims to Install Over-the-Horizon Missile on Littoral Combat Ship by End of 2016

A Kongsberg Naval Strike Missile (NSM) is launched from the Littoral Combat Ship USS Coronado (LCS 4) during a Sept. 23, 2014, test off the coast of Southern California. US Navy photo.

A Kongsberg Naval Strike Missile (NSM) is launched from the Littoral Combat Ship USS Coronado (LCS 4) during a Sept. 23, 2014, test off the coast of Southern California. US Navy photo.

PENTAGON – The Navy hopes to have an over-the-horizon missile on a Littoral Combat Ship by the end of the year, the service’s surface warfare director told USNI News on Thursday.

Rear Adm. Peter Fanta (OPNAV N96) said in an interview that putting an OTH missile on LCS is “an absolute requirement” for the Navy. Despite challenges associated with moving money around mid-fiscal year, he said the stakeholders are all on board and engineers are hard at work studying which missiles could operate from the LCS deck.

“It takes a little while for the guys with the slide rules to figure out … what the deck strength needs to be and what angle the launcher needs to sit at,” Fanta said.
“That’s my biggest hold right now is guys doing math.”

Fanta said he is on track to have a missile on the LCS by the end of 2016, at least as a demonstration if not a permanent solution. He said the missile and the ship would be much more connected than a previous one-time demonstration of firing a Kongsberg Naval Strike Missile from USS Coronado (LCS-4).

“I’m looking at a number of missiles – not just the Norwegian missile, I’m also looking at Harpoon and several other missiles. What bolts on, and what can I put on a console that has feeds from the combat system? … I’m trying to do that, again, if I can get enough engineering done to allow me to do this, I’m trying to do that this year.”

The idea to put an OTH missile on the LCS came out of the study that recommended building an up-armored and up-gunned LCS-based frigate, Fanta said. But the idea also nestles nicely with Fanta’s vision for how the Navy’s small surface combatant should participate in anti-surface warfare in the future.

“What happens when you put long-range missiles on something? What happens when you take smaller combatants and hit an adversary from multiple directions?” Fanta said.
“We did a study up with the [U.S. Naval War College] and we’ve done internal OPNAV studies that say, what happens if – just do away with the rest of the fleet and just let small ships hit the adversary. And we find out that you lose a bunch of small ships, but you also put the enemy fleet on the bottom of the ocean.”

The addition of an OTH missile to the suite of weapons on LCS would allow the ships to use their low draft and 40 knot top speeds to fight in different ways.

USS Fort Worth (LCS-3) conducts patrols in international waters of the South China Sea near the Spratly Islands on May 11, 2015. US Navy Photo

USS Fort Worth (LCS-3) conducts patrols in international waters of the South China Sea near the Spratly Islands on May 11, 2015. US Navy Photo

“If you’re in a bunch of islands and you’re moving around fast, and you’re continuously shifting your logistics hubs, and you can take fuel at any little port, and you can turn around and grab a couple more missiles and go hit them again, and you bring back Ulithi Atoll, which in World War II had these huge ammunition dumps,” the wargame suggests the small surface combatants would be successful, he said.
“We relearned what we learned with the [Pegasus] hydrofoils back in the 80s. … We did an exercise back in the 80s, we brought the 2nd Fleet into an enclosed area of water, and we had two Harpoon-carrying hydrofoils take down most of 2nd Fleet. Why? Because you come at them where they can’t target you, in amongst the small context, in amongst the reef lines, and you can get in there in eight to 10 feet of water and you can come at them from all directions. You’re small, you’re hard to target, they don’t know where you’re coming from, and as long as you get the targeting information coming to you, they don’t know where you’re coming from.”

Fanta said the 1980s exercise showed that this strategy forced the 2nd Fleet to disperse its air wing, with each plane seeking out the small combatants, and “if you hit them from multiple directions, you put a lot of those ships on the bottom before they catch up to you.”

That strategy – learned in World War II, relearned in the 1980s and relearned yet again during the recent small surface combatant studies with OPNAV and the Naval War College – is precisely how Fanta would like to see the LCS fleet operate.

Bolting on the OTH missile is a good start but not a final step in realizing the vision, he added.

“What happens if I shoot a torpedo at an enemy surface combatant? Everything they’re building, everything the rest of the world is building is to take on cruise missiles,” he said.
“What happens if I’ve got a really good anti-surface torpedo the size of a Mk 48 and I pop it off the side of a surface ship and point it at an enemy group, and it goes a really long way and blows something up? I don’t know how they’re going to get away from it, that’s a cost-imposing strategy. And that’s really what we’re developing with that modular ability of LCS – bolt something else on and go try it. If I get a better missile, bolt it on. If I get a better weapon, sensor, whatever, bolt it on, let’s go try it.”

  • Putting Missiles is still not enough. The LCS is still a POS and a Frigate/Corvette wannabe.

    • well they can’t change it.

    • Secundius

      @ Nicky.

      A BAE 20MJ Railgun would be nice…

  • Don Bacon

    Aha, I get it, a littoral combat ship that fights fleets from the littorals. This a change from the prior Navy LCS mission: “LCS is a fast, agile, focused-mission platform designed for operation in near-shore environments yet capable of open-ocean operation. It is designed to defeat asymmetric ‘anti-access” threats such as mines, quiet diesel submarines and fast surface craft.'” ……Now LCS takes on the big guys, with targets like “an enemy group” and “the 2nd Fleet.” …Watch the bouncing ball.

    • cricha43

      Bacon. You show up on seemingly every site I read defense news on and you have never said anything positive that I have read. You badmouth everything. Its easy to badh everyone from your high chair, much harder to actually spout knowledge or stand up for something.

      • Don Bacon

        So I take it that you believe changing the LCS mission on a whim after fourteen years is a good thing? Or do you believe anything at all, other than it’s your role to criticize others. You might try to be useful, that would be good.

        • sferrin

          “You might try to be useful, that would be good.”

          Wow, talk about he pot calling the kettle black.

      • Curtis Conway

        And here I thought I was the only one that thought that.

  • Unable Pown

    Its something we should have, but there is a reason leading countries have always invested in capital ships over corvettes/sloops/galleys/etc

    • publius_maximus_III

      Loved da galley reference, Unable. Talk about a craft with low draft and high maneuverability. USN needs to bring back that kettle drum guy and those row after row of oarsmen: “Ramming speed — BOOM, BOOM, BOOM, BOOM…”

      • disqus_zommBwspv9

        The ROKN PKG 711 Yoon Youngha draws 16 feet but is pretty well armed 76mm gun
        Doosan DST ‘No Bong’ dual 40mm gun 4 × SSM-700K Hae Sung anti-ship subsonic speed missile But he was talking about the Pegasus class hydrofoils. If I remember with the foils up they could move around in less than 10 feet of water. but with the foils down they needed over 12 feet? It has been so long. I rode on the Pegasus once. Was told that if I fell over the side while she was flying, that I would most likey break every bone in my body. Imagine hitting the water at 45 mph. like landing on concrete. Heard that they threw and Oscar overboard while flying and the Oscar skipped like a stone across the way a few times before stopping.

        • publius_maximus_III

          Pegasus, what a great name for a hydrofoil. When I was a young shaver in grammar school, there was a very large mosaic on the wall at one end of the main stairwell. The title of it was “Bellerophon on Pegasus kills the Chimaera” (from Greek mythology). A winged horse with an armed warrior on it’s back, not a “My Little Pony”.

        • publius_maximus_III

          Oscar, had to look that one up:

          “The buoyant dummy used during man-overboard drills. Named for the Oscar flag that is flown during a man overboard evolution. If a sailor is “nominated for an Oscar”, someone has suggested that sailor be thrown overboard.”

          • disqus_zommBwspv9

            one of my jobs as a Boatswain Mate after Oscar was recovered was to break out the sail needle, palm and sail twine was to fix Oscar. In the shipyards, we took kapok life jackets that had been survey and made a new Oscar. That took a bit of time On calling a sailor Oscar. We would never give that honor to,a doper or firebug. Those guy always manage to get to the MAA shack or goat locker pretty fast

          • publius_maximus_III

            If I live to be 1000 years old, I’ll never get enough of such US Navy lore. Thanks for sharing.

          • publius_maximus_III

            As a bos’n, did you ever have to pipe aboard an Admiral, or is that done with recordings now?

          • disqus_zommBwspv9

            More than once, usually they were schedule events and there were at least two of us Boatswain Mate to do it. I also knew a couple of quartermasters that were pretty good at it. Something I really never care to do, but I did it a few times. Once while on the Shreveport we were running a fire drill and surflant 3 star was going down the piers and walk aboard it was about 1900 so the captain and XO were ashore. Thought the CDO was going to crap himself. So surflant comes down to where we were doing the drill at. And being the Shreveport back then. We always charged firehoses during the drills. All the crew not envolve were muster on the flight deck and I was in charge of the rescue and assistance team. We were in the next repair locker. So the hoses where charged, one split getting everyone wet, but surflant was impress that the FF TEAM quickly change out the damaged hose, charged the new one and continue the drill. Surflant left the ship after the drill was over. The flag LT was mad they got wet. The next morning at Quarters. The Captain ( who normally came aboard after quarters ). Address the crew. I though we were in an chewing out since our division was closest to the quarterdeck. The Captain look upset and only grunted. When the CO address the crew our skipper broke into a big smile. Surflant was really impress with Shreveport. and sent the ship a BZ. Bravo Zulu. being a Friday we all got Liberty at noon except for the duty section.

        • Secundius

          @ Sailboater.

          Hit something with the Foil’s Deployed, YOUR SREWED. And Speed back to a Repair Tender is about 12-kts…

          • disqus_zommBwspv9

            NoW general seaman
            I wonder which of the 3 foils needs to be damage?? Refueling a hydrofoil underway was a real trick. On the Seattle AOE-3 we took a number of refueling hoses used on a flight deck and modify 4 inch hose saddles to support the hoses. A real flying rig. No span wire could be used. We used a two of the saddle winches and a cat head with 300 feet of double braided line. Took like 3 hours to rig and 25 minutes to refuel a Pegasus class hydrofoil. I think the hydrofoil was flying at the time and we were doing well above our normal unrep speed of 12 knots

          • Secundius

            @ Saiboater.

            As I recall the Rear Foil was a Single Component with a Port/Starboard Support Strut. And had a Greater Draft than the Bow Strut. What was the 1/2 Cable Length Line, “Kevlar 29 or 49”, to be only a Double-Braid Line…

  • Curtis Conway

    “What happens if I shoot a torpedo at an enemy surface combatant?” Where are the torpedo tubes?

    The Littorals do provide an interesting environment in which to play, but this IS NOT WWII. Basic sensors on fishing boats today do a pretty good job of tracking things, forget about the systems on small combatants of other nations.

    ” “if you hit them from multiple directions,….” Let us HOPE the enemy does not do that to our LCS/FFs for they only have ONE SeaRAM.

    AND

    “It takes a little while for the guys with the slide rules to figure out …” Guys with the ‘Slide Rules’ went out with the Apollo Moon Landings. Maybe the mentality here is too . . . WWII. If the manufacturers cannot answer these questions as soon as you asked them, then we picked the wrong folks to build our platforms. These kinds of upgrades should already be factored into future improvements to the platforms. The National Security Cutter was built this way by a professional, proven, surface combatant ship manufacturer. One gets what they pay for and in this case it must not have been very much, except for . . . speed.

    • PolicyWonk

      How correct you are. The Legend-class NSC represents an outstanding platform: seaworthy; room for growth; capable of cold water operations; long legs; on the slipways now; parity with the USCG fleet (added bonus).

      The “slide rules” comment is *very* disturbing: most of those who will be assigned to man the LCS don’t even know what a slide rule IS. This man is a dinosaur (to be polite).

      The best alternative we have (short of buying up-armed/protected NSC’s from HI) is to piggy-back on the Saudi Arabian version of the LCS that they have agreed to pay for the development costs – and these are only marginally more expensive than our current LCS’s (with mission package). But these ships are *vastly* more capable, and able to protect themselves.

      • Curtis Conway

        What is most disturbing about Mr. “Slide Rules” is he is trying to sell us a bill of goods about the LCS performing ASW in deep water with towed ASW sensors, which is a restricted maneuvering environment, that cannot operate properly when deployed by an acoustically noisy Battle Group, and must go out on station at a significant distance, taking it out of that ‘protective bubble’ we hear so much about. If one has ever been in ‘Blue Water’ sea on a Coast Guard Cutter . . . well you will get the idea about a small and light platform in heavy weather, so they are not going to be getting a lot of rest, (the Pacific is a Big Pond), and they have minimum fuel requirements so they will UNREP often. This vessel represents a steaming accident by definition, or only Special Forces Qualified sailors will be on it.

        The United States Navy needs 50+ Guide Missile Frigates.

        • PolicyWonk

          Excellent points. To summarize, on one hand they claim LCS will be protected by Burke’s (or one of three Zumwalts) in contested environments, but OTOH assume its a good idea to send a defenseless LCS far away from the CSG (or whatever fleet its supposed to be part of) for ASW work where there is no protection.

          A ship that cannot protect itself is not much of an asset. If the USN wanted to merely show the flag, we don’t need to blow well over $500M on an over-sized speed boat to do it (assuming inclusion of some mission package variant).

          And, we already know a shallow draft Freedom class LCS isn’t likely to be much fun in a real blow (not that being in a blow is fun at any time – as anyone who’s been there is unlikely to forget).

          Where I fully agree with your assessment w/r/t a need for a fleet of blue-water frigates (we both seem to prefer the HI Legend-class NSC’s as the sea-frame), the Saudi LCS variant would be acceptable.

          I do see a need for a littoral/shallow-draft fighting ship where use of a frigate or Burke would be wasteful (maybe 1000 tons, armed/armored to the teeth). This is of course kind of what LCS was initially envisioned to be, before it became a bloated/next-to-useless “Franken-Ship”.

  • Michael Nunez

    Will See ……?

  • Pingback: How To Put Down Decking | wrought iron()

  • publius_maximus_III

    At least they won’t need one of the new Oilers, just drop by any convenient enemy port and gas up. And did I mention it could be a SHALLOW enemy port?

    Still, I like the way this admiral is thinking. What have we got now, and how can we best utilize it from all the lessons we’ve learned in the past?

    As for torpedo tubes on an LCS, why heck, the things look like an oversized PT Boat already. Tilt a launcher at the right angle, and maybe you could have a Harpoon sitting in it one day and a Mk 48 torpedo sitting in it the next. Follow that wacky admiral over there out of the box, and over the horizon…

  • LewCypher

    LCS CO: “TAO, engage that hostile surface contact with NSM.”
    LCS TAO: “Sir, we can’t. We were configured with the ASW module before we left port.”

  • @USS_Fallujah

    “we find out that you lose a bunch of small ships, but you also put the enemy fleet on the bottom of the ocean” That should really get the SSC (LCS or FFE) excited to go to work every day. We’re going to get you guys killed, but at least your death might clear some lanes for the guys we care about.

    • publius_maximus_III

      @NotRizzo

      I can see their new recruiting posters already:

      Join the Navy, See the World
      Draw fire away from REAL ships
      Sail the LCS Kamikazes

    • PolicyWonk

      This is supported by the findings of the Navy’s own Inspector General’s report on the so-called “Littoral Combat Ship”. The IG’s report declared that “neither variant of LCS is likely to survive” any of the missions naval commanders are likely to assign it.

      Thats got to be really inspiring to anyone who’s ordered to man these gawd-awful Corporate Welfare Programs.

  • TCS

    In “eight to ten feet of water,” the LCS becomes a stationary platform. The advertised draft of the LCS is greater than fourteen feet.

    • Matt

      Maybe the draft is reduced when the ship is on plain at 40 knots? My boat’s draft is reduced by about half on plain. Yes a ship is different but 40 knots is faster than my boat can run… pathetic I know!

      • USNVO

        While the draft is reduced on plane, you don’t want to have to stop, that was demonstrated by several hydrofoils. On top of that, the water jets are going to suck up all kind of junk off the bottom in really shallow water. However, if you take a quick look at Ports of the World you quickly see that even a 20ft navigation draft vice a 30ft draft opens up the number of ports available by a factor of 4 or 5. For instance, the MCM class has a 13ft draft and they can go all kinds of places other Navy ships can’t.

        • Lazarus

          The PBR’s from Vietnam service had waterjet pumps and had no trouble operating in very shallow rivers. Waterjet propulsion is better than propellers for shallow water ops.

          • disqus_zommBwspv9

            A PBR drew very little water (inches) plus the sea strainer system enable them to be clean very quickly. The neatest think I ever saw happen (was riding in one at the time). While we were running at full speed the Chief yelled hang on and put one of the waterjets to run in reverse. Scared the crap out of me. We spun like a top and he threw the waterjets back to forward. And we took off. Just the thing for an E2 just out of boot. We were at Little Creek. 1973

          • publius_maximus_III

            Those Chiefs, real cut-ups when it comes time to break in a fresh Seaman Apprentice. “Hang On” — lmao

  • Jester

    How will LCS target the OTH missile without a sensor that see’s OTH?

    • Lazarus

      Network-based operations, and if the network is jammed, LCS will have to operate like other smaller combatants. The FFG 7’s did not have a significant OTH detection capability when armed with Harpoon. LCS is not an air defense warship and its sensors compare with similar small frigates/corvettes.

      • disqus_zommBwspv9

        No OTH. Isn’t that what helicopters/drones are for to pass information via a Downlink to the shooter Or an E-2 if it’s available During 80’s the hydrofoils each carrying 8 harpoons , I believed used a helicopter

    • Secundius

      @ Jester.

      Each LCS/FF, carry at least Two Northrop-Grumman MQ-8 Fire Scout Drones and an assortment of Boeing Instiu ScanEagle’s A/B’s Drones…

    • @USS_Fallujah

      Where will Tico’s & Burke’s get their OTH target tracking for harpoon or tomahawks? ISR isn’t the problem (we can track enemy ships from far outside their air cover), but I’m equally dubious of the LCS/FFE’s ability to remain hiddeen themselves while navigating into position to fire on enemy warships, and thus ending up on the receiving end of enemy ASCMs they are ill equipped to defend against.

      • Lazarus

        LCS has a better point defense missile system in RAM/Sea Ram than did the retired Perry’s with their Block 1B CIWS.

    • Arbuthnaught

      How about targeting with ESM. They can probably fingerprint emissions signatures of most enemy combatants and or systems. They can also do the same with passive sonar OTH if the particular LCS has a sonar model.

  • Tony4

    Sorry, when was IOC again? I missed that piece…

  • Masau80

    If this makes so much sense now, how did it get missed in the design phase of this albatross? Will they need to add a few more bunks (where) for the additional crew needed to service and operate the weapons system?

    • Secundius

      @ Masau80.

      Typical Crew Complement for the Ship itself is 57. But TWO Aircrew’s are also Provided. One for the Manned Helicopter Detachment and the other for the Fire Scout/ScanEagle’s Drones carried aboard. Total is about 108, plus there also a Testing Crew, for various Equipment Carried Aboard…

    • disqus_zommBwspv9

      ? Hot bunk like the use to do on Fast attack SSN?

  • Matt

    I can’t believe LCS was not designed by some smart people and seeing that there are three giant holes in the ship with room for maybe 16 VLS cells each I’m guessing the Navy has been playing a game of hide and seek with the true capabilities of these ships, and probably for good reason. 48 VLS cells for Harpoons or whatever combination would be more like the US Navy. It is known Saudi Arabia’s version will include Mk. 41 VLS. The three large spaces are meant for something, obviously.

    • USNVO

      The spaces were for NLOS-LS and similar missile modules (15 missiles per module). That is also where they are going to stick the Hellfire (I am not sure about the configuration) but it is both too short for ASCMs or ESSM, plus not being engineered for those missiles.

  • John B. Morgen

    Anyone would think in today’s age of modern warships that missiles would be considered to be standard weapon systems for SAM/SSM/AAW tasks; besides having the standard armament of main guns. What’s going on with Naval Systems Command, who’s really designing the LCS warships?.

    • publius_maximus_III

      These days we’re leading from the stern, John.

      • John B. Morgen

        If you are referring to the LCS concept, then I would agreed with you.

    • Secundius

      @ John B. Morgen.

      The Design’s were made by the Manufacturers of the Two Classes…

      • John B. Morgen

        I have said this before, so I guess I would to say this again. The Navy is much better off of copying an European designed frigate than building these flawed designed LCS warships.

        • Secundius

          @ John B. Morgen.

          If Freedom and Independence are “FLAWED” Designs, then so is the Gerald Ford, the “Chesty” Puller, and the Zumwalt. Because they haven’t been “Blooded” YET…

          • John B. Morgen

            The Navy was much better off of building three additional Nimitz class aircraft carriers than wasting valuable funds on a [GOLD PLATED] new carrier class. As for the two LCS class warships, both of them are under armed but glorified patrol gun boats (PFs). A throwback from the last century’s Admiral Pratt strategy scheme that failed.A strategy plan that relied on too profoundly on ocean going gun boats than on both heavy and light cruisers which were better armed for the tasks in the Pacific. And same for the Admiral Zumwalt class program, too overly [GOLD PLATED], which a simple improved but modified Ticonderoga class design would do. The Navy is [NOT] being prudent on its decisions of building the right or practical warships to meet the treats from afar.

          • Secundius

            @ John B. Morgen.

            The chances of building THREE more Nimitz class Aircraft Carriers, from the “Keel” to “Launching”. Is between NIL and NONE…

          • John B. Morgen

            There’s nothing wrong in building three more Nimitz class carriers, since the class has been well tested; it is a proven class warship and it is a better carrier class than the Ford class; which the latter has been delayed too many times with costs overruns and needless tests. Adding three more Nimitz carriers would be the most prudent corrective action to resolve the carrier shortage problem.

          • sferrin

            Justify your “better carrier class than the Ford class” comment.

            I’m also more than a little amused that you seem to think if we built three more Nimitz class and THEN build a new carrier class that some how, miraculously, it would be trouble-free.

          • John B. Morgen

            The Nimitz class is [a lot more trouble-free] than the Ford class for costs repairs, costs overruns and too many other delays. I think the Ford program supports my position—quite well—if you [sterrin] have been following the Ford carrier program. The Ford program has too many bugs, thus the program needs to be rethink or redesign in order to get rid of needless delays. The program is over $12 billion USDs or three times more to just build one Nimitz class carrier.

          • sferrin

            Whoa, a carrier class that’s been in service for 40 years has fewer unknowns than a brand new class? No. Way. (Judas I give up. I’m clearly wasting my time with you.)

          • John B. Morgen

            As long the Nimitz class is performing to the designed specifications, and meets the defense needs of the nation-state. Then so what if the class leader is over 40+ years old.

          • sferrin

            Jesus Christ, even if they built three more Nimitz, you’d still have to replace the class eventually, and then guess what. You’re right back here with an expensive new class. Better to do it now and get the upfront costs out of the way.

          • John B. Morgen

            Since the Nimitz class is an improvement over the USS Enterprise (CVN-65) class design, I would suspect the Navy could keep operating the Nimitz carriers deployed between 50-60 years+; before requiring to build replacement carriers.

          • sferrin

            CVN-65 *just* made it to 50 years before decommissioning. (Arguably it might have gone a few more years if there was funding, though I did hear it was pretty decrepit by the time it left.) The Nimitz class will HAVE to last that long as the build rate for the Nimitz class was far more rapid than the planned build rate for the Ford class. And no, you don’t wait until the entire Nimitz class is in the scrap yard before you start building the next class. CVN-68 will be 47 years old by the time USS Ford is commissioned. At the planned build rate it will take half a century to replace the Nimitz class.

          • John B. Morgen

            At the present rate of time the USS Gerald R. Ford may never become a commissioned carrier, she more or less becoming a mere [White Elephant]. As for the Enterprise (CVN-65), we could have gotten a few more years out from her, enough time for a newer CV replaces her.

          • sferrin

            LOL. Wow.

          • John B. Morgen

            Yes, wow—sferrin! We could have built between two or three Nimitz class aircraft carriers, and maybe a few surface cruiser type warships from all the funds that are being wasted with the Gerald R Ford class. Now think about it?

      • old guy

        G’WAN. If we are going to use OTH missiles, we can put them on LHAs, LPDs and LCACs. No nead for combat ships.

        • Secundius

          @ old guy.

          They want to mount Longbow Hellfire missiles without the Longbow Radar System. Where’s the LOGIC in That. Range is STILL ONLY 8,000-meters, but without the Advantages of the Longbow Radar Tracking System. The British Brimstone II, is Roughly the same size. But more than 3 & 1/8 times the range of the Hellfire, 25,000-meters…

        • sferrin

          Uhm, wut?

  • Bill

    What is in the exhaust of that Kongsberg? Looks nasty.

    • publius_maximus_III

      Don’t get them started. This administration will be forcing “green” propellants onto the missile manufacturers, to reduce global warming.

  • If we want to consider torpedoes against surface vessels, give the Mk54 an anti-surface option and launch from a P-8 at high altitude. The wings will give it long range and even a small warhead exploded under the stern will immobilize even a large ship and likely sink a Type 056.

  • Jon

    Lipstick, meet pig.

  • Pingback: Untitled | Naval, Military, and Marine Life()

  • SierraSierraQuebec

    Why put an ASM on a ship whose function is littoral warfare?

    The 155mm AGS would serve littoral warfare functions and provide a secondary ASM capability. The hull would need to be stretched/enlargened/strengthened and/or some of the machinery removed (the speed of these ships is of dubious value; most speed biased ships have never been successful in practice).

    Rip the guns right off the DDG-1000’s if necessary, and give them extra ASM’s, rationalizing and clarifying the functional role of both classes of ships.

  • Pingback: Decking Installing | low - driveway gates()

  • Pingback: Can I Lay Decking On Gravel | wooden - trellis()

  • Pingback: Horizon Decking | metal - chainlinkfence()

  • Pingback: Can I Lay Decking On Gravel | treated - fenceposts()

  • disqus_zommBwspv9

    FYI the Hydrofoil USS Aries PHM-5 has been saved from the breakers and the people who save her are looking to restoring her into a moving Museum and get her flying again

  • Knox Class, Perry Class, LCS’s (both classes…I wonder how much money has been spent on all these crap cans. Knox class built and rebuilt until a fairly robust ASW platform. And the beat goes on and on and on…where will it end, fleet on bottom sailors dead, and our Island nation kaput. MMCS(SW)(SS) USN Ret.

  • Pingback: How To Lay Decking Steps | statement - wrought iron()

  • Pingback: How Fast Is A Knot On The Water | purifying - water purifying()

  • Andre

    Finally…

  • Pingback: Can I Bring Water On A Cruise Ship | top water pressure()

  • Pingback: Lay Decking | high - gardengates()

  • Pingback: Decking Instalation | playgrounds - vinyl fencing()

  • Pingback: Installing Decking | panels - bamboopanels()

  • Pingback: Lay Decking Boards | panels - bamboopanels()

  • old guy

    They have warn me out. I think that I will withdraw from the (verbal) battlefield.
    GOOD LUCK

  • Pingback: How To Lay Angled Decking | low - driveway gates()