Tag Archives: Naval Sea Systems Command

New NAVSEA Commander's Intent: Complete Ship Maintenance On Time

New NAVSEA Commander’s Intent: Complete Ship Maintenance On Time

Boatswain’s Mate Seaman Kasey Ringwalda, a native of Dayton, Ore., uses a grinder to remove paint from deck station 11 on board the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68). Nimitz is currently undergoing an extended planned incremental maintenance availability at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility. US Navy Photo

Boatswain’s Mate Seaman Kasey Ringwalda, a native of Dayton, Ore., uses a grinder to remove paint from deck station 11 on board the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68). Nimitz is currently undergoing an extended planned incremental maintenance availability at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility. US Navy Photo

HAMPTON, VA. — New commander of Naval Sea Systems Command Vice Adm. Tom Moore said shipyards are nearing an opportunity to “reset” after struggling in recent years to get aircraft carriers and submarines out of availabilities on time, and he hopes the yards can take measures now to keep the next wave of availabilities on track. Read More

Video: Successful F-35, SM-6 Live Fire Test Points to Expansion in Networked Naval Warfare

Video: Successful F-35, SM-6 Live Fire Test Points to Expansion in Networked Naval Warfare

The Navy conducts its first live fire demonstration to successfully test the integration of F-35 with existing Naval Integrated Fire Control-Counter Air architecture, Sept. 12, 2016. US Navy Photo

The Navy conducts its first live fire demonstration to successfully test the integration of F-35 with existing Naval Integrated Fire Control-Counter Air architecture, Sept. 12, 2016. US Navy Photo

A Monday test pairing a Lockheed Martin F-35B Lighting II Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) with an Aegis Combat System armed with a Raytheon Standard Missile-6 is the latest step in expanding how the Navy and Marine Corps will share data on future battlefields. Read More

Ingalls Wins LHA-8 Contract, NASSCO To Build 6 Fleet Oilers

Ingalls Wins LHA-8 Contract, NASSCO To Build 6 Fleet Oilers

An artist's rendering of the LHA-8 amphibious assault ship. Huntington Ingalls Industries image.

An artist’s rendering of the LHA-8 amphibious assault ship. Huntington Ingalls Industries image.

This post has been updated to include comment from Ingalls Shipbuilding.

The Navy awarded a contract to General Dynamics National Steel and Shipbuilding Co. (NASSCO) for six John Lewis-class (T-AO-205) fleet oilers and a contract to Ingalls Shipbuilding for the LHA-8 amphibious assault ship, wrapping up a year-and-a-half-long effort to preserve the shipbuilding industrial base. Read More

Navy Expanding NIFC-CA To Include Anti-Surface Weapons, F-35 Sensors

Navy Expanding NIFC-CA To Include Anti-Surface Weapons, F-35 Sensors

The guided-missile destroyer USS John Paul Jones (DDG-53) fired the anti-surface Standard Missile-6 Block I in January 2016, proving out the new weapon and its ability to integrate into the NIFC-CA architecture. US Navy photo.

The guided-missile destroyer USS John Paul Jones (DDG-53) fired the anti-surface Standard Missile-6 Block I in January 2016, proving out the new weapon and its ability to integrate into the NIFC-CA architecture. US Navy photo.

Navy engineers are working to bring new aircraft sensors and new weapons into the Naval Integrated Fire Control-Counter Air (NIFC-CA) architecture, with near-term goals of bringing in the F-35’s radio frequency (RF) sensor and the anti-surface variant of the Standard Missile-6. Read More

Future Navy, Marine Corps Acquisition Will Challenge Cost Estimates, Sustainment Models

Future Navy, Marine Corps Acquisition Will Challenge Cost Estimates, Sustainment Models

U.S. Marines Lance Cpl. Jason D. Launder, left, an avionics technician and Cpl. Noe L. Munoz, a collateral duty inspector, both with Marine Attack Squadron 311, troubleshoot and replace the landing gear system on an AV-8B Harrier. US Marine Corps Photo

U.S. Marines Lance Cpl. Jason D. Launder, left, an avionics technician and Cpl. Noe L. Munoz, a collateral duty inspector, both with Marine Attack Squadron 311, troubleshoot and replace the landing gear system on an AV-8B Harrier. US Marine Corps Photo

NATIONAL HARBOR, Md. – Future weapons acquisition will have to grapple with several challenges as the Navy replaces legacy systems with new ones that may accomplish a mission in drastically different ways –comparing total ownership costs of dissimilar systems, predicting how the fleet may employ these innovative concepts, and building in some agility to react when predictions don’t pan out, Navy leaders said Wednesday at the Navy League’s Sea-Air-Space Exposition 2016. Read More