Tag Archives: Arleigh Burke-class destroyer

CBO: Navy's Next Nuclear Attack Submarine Could Cost $5.5B a Hull

CBO: Navy’s Next Nuclear Attack Submarine Could Cost $5.5B a Hull

Virginia-class fast-attack submarine USS Missouri (SSN-780) on May 31, 2018. US Navy Photo

The Navy’s next-generation attack submarine program may cost $69 billion more than the service is planning to spend, according to a Congressional Budget Office estimate released this week, creating a major delta between the Navy’s long-term shipbuilding cost estimates and CBO’s. Read More

NAVSEA Harnessing Big Data to Dig Out of Ship Maintenance Backlog

NAVSEA Harnessing Big Data to Dig Out of Ship Maintenance Backlog

Rear Adm. Stephen Evans, left, commander of Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 2 and Rear Adm. Sara A. Joyner, right, take a tour of the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN-77) on Aug. 26, 2019. US Navy Photo

The following post has been updated to correct the name of a submarine referred to in the story. On Friday, Vice Adm. Tom Moore referred to attack submarine USS Asheville (SSN-758) not USS Nashville.

The heads of the Navy’s ship maintenance efforts want to get destroyer work back on track using new data tools and an under-development predictive schedule to prevent another major backlog in repair work. Read More

Navy Reverting DDGs Back to Physical Throttles, After Fleet Rejects Touchscreen Controls

Navy Reverting DDGs Back to Physical Throttles, After Fleet Rejects Touchscreen Controls

IBNS helm controls on USS Dewey (DDG-105). US Navy Photo

SAN DIEGO – The Navy will begin reverting destroyers back to a physical throttle and traditional helm control system in the next 18 to 24 months, after the fleet overwhelmingly said they prefer mechanical controls to touchscreen systems in the aftermath of the fatal USS John S. McCain (DDG-56) collision. Read More

Navy Considering More Advanced Burke Destroyers as Large Surface Combatant Timeline Slips

Navy Considering More Advanced Burke Destroyers as Large Surface Combatant Timeline Slips

The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Bainbridge (DDG 96) launches a Standard Missile (SM) 2 Block IIIA on Nov. 18, 2018. Bainbridge is underway with Norfolk-based cruiser-destroyer (CRUDES) units from Carrier Strike Group 12 conducting a Live Fire With a Purpose (LFWAP) event. US Navy photo.

SAN DIEGO – The Navy is looking at “something beyond even a Flight III” combat capability for its new-build destroyers, as its plans for transitioning from building the Arleigh Burke-class destroyer to the future Large Surface Combatant continue to evolve and the LSC procurement date continues to slide. Read More

Navy Commissions Destroyer USS Paul Ignatius

Navy Commissions Destroyer USS Paul Ignatius

Navy Station Norfolk’s Saluting Battery renders honors during the commissioning ceremony of USS Paul Ignatius (DDG-117), the 67th Arleigh Burke-class destroyer. Navy photo

The newest Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer, USS Paul Ignatius (DDG-117), joined the fleet over the weekend in a commissioning ceremony in Fort Lauderdale, Fla.

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Navy Mulling How to Make Surface Fleet Flexible, Lethal

Navy Mulling How to Make Surface Fleet Flexible, Lethal

USS Roosevelt (DDG-80) and USS Carney (DDG-64) are moored abreast in Faslane, Scotland on May 7, 2019. US Navy Photo

WASHINGTON, D.C. — A panel of senior Navy civilian officials said the planning efforts for the future combat fleet was focused on making the fleet more flexible, interoperable and lethal. Read More

Navy: Next Large Surface Combatant Will Look A Lot Like Zumwalt

Navy: Next Large Surface Combatant Will Look A Lot Like Zumwalt

Destroyer Zumwalt (DDG-1000) transits the Atlantic Ocean during acceptance trials with the Navy’s Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV). US Navy Photo

This post has been updated with a clarification comment from ASNE’s Richard White.

WASHINGTON, D.C. — The Navy’s next large surface combatant will probably look more like the futuristic Zumwalt class of guided-missile destroyers than fleet’s current workhorse class of Arleigh Burke destroyers, the program executive officer said. Read More

Navy to Field High-Energy Laser Weapon, Laser Dazzler on Ships This Year as Development Continues

Navy to Field High-Energy Laser Weapon, Laser Dazzler on Ships This Year as Development Continues

The Office of Naval Research highlights the results of some laser weapon tests, showing the damage that its in-development Solid State Laser- Technology Maturation system did to various unmanned systems, metals and more. USNI News photo.

The Navy will field versions of both its highest-power laser weapon and its low-end non-lethal laser dazzler later this year, gaining operational experience with directed energy weapons that will continue to focus engineers’ efforts building out the Navy Laser Family of Systems (NLFoS). Read More

SECNAV, CNO Update Congress on Columbia SSBNs, New Large Surface Combatant

SECNAV, CNO Update Congress on Columbia SSBNs, New Large Surface Combatant

Ohio-class ballistic-missile submarine USS Rhode Island (SSBN-740) blue crew returns to its homeport at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Ga. in 2018. US Navy Photo

CAPITOL HILL – Navy leaders told House and Senate appropriators this week that the service is ready to move out on its first new large surface ship design in a decade. Secretary of the Navy Richard V. Spencer and Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson also said the service is moving to build in more margin for its new ballistic missile submarine program. Read More

Lockheed Martin: Sixth-Generation Fighter Could Have Laser Weapon

Lockheed Martin: Sixth-Generation Fighter Could Have Laser Weapon

Artist’s concept of a HELIOS laser system aboard a U.S. destroyer. Lockheed Martin Image

ARLINGTON, Va. – Lasers to counter unmanned aerial vehicles and sensors to scan the horizon, scrambling an adversary’s electronic equipment while relaying information to other systems – all packaged in a stealthy airframe – could be possible for a sixth-generation fighter, according to experts at Lockheed Martin.

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