Category Archives: Surface Forces

Opinion: Seapower is An American Priority

Opinion: Seapower is An American Priority

Sailors watch as the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN 65) departs Naval Station Norfolk for Newport News Shipbuilding in June 2013. US Navy Photo

Sailors watch as the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN 65) departs Naval Station Norfolk for Newport News Shipbuilding in June 2013. US Navy Photo

In September 1960, the carrier Enterprise was christened at Newport News Shipbuilding & Dry Dock. Adm. Arleigh Burke, then chief of naval operations, spoke to the large crowd, saying, “Whenever the Enterprise roams in the traditional freedom of the seas, she is the sovereign of the United States, a mighty symbol of our determination to preserve liberty and justice and a clear sign of our nation’s ability to do so.” Read More

China Critical of U.S. Senate South China Sea Resolution

China Critical of U.S. Senate South China Sea Resolution

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Chinese officials ‘strongly’ oppose a Monday U.S. Senate action that “condemns the use of coercion, threats, or force by naval, maritime security, or fishing vessels and military or civilian aircraft,” in the South and East China Sea, according to a Thursday report from the Xinhua news agency. Read More

Two Options for Pentagon's Future

Two Options for Pentagon’s Future

Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel answers reporters' questions during a Pentagon press briefing on July 31, 2013. Department of Defense Photo

Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel answers reporters’ questions during a Pentagon press briefing on July 31, 2013. Department of Defense Photo

Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel said the Pentagon has to choose between a small high tech force or a larger one with antiquated equipment if the services are forced to live in a budgetary world dictated by the mandatory budget cuts known as sequestration, he told reporters in a Pentagon briefing on Wednesday. Read More

Navy Officials Single Out Freedom Generator Woes

Navy Officials Single Out Freedom Generator Woes

Cmdr. Joe Femino, commanding officer of USS Curtis Wilbur (DDG 54) watches USS Freedom (LCS 1) through a pair of binoculars on June 20. US Navy Photo

Cmdr. Joe Femino, commanding officer of USS Curtis Wilbur (DDG 54) watches USS Freedom (LCS 1) through a pair of binoculars on June 20. US Navy Photo

The generator problem that sidelined USS Freedom (LCS-1) earlier this month is “the most significant design deficiency that we’re dealing with today,” the Navy’s top acquisition official told a congressional panel on Thursday.

Speaking before the House Armed Services Subcommittee on Seapower and Projection forces, assistant secretary of the Navy for Research, Development & Acquisition, Sean Stackley singled out the widely publicized July 20 generator failure as the largest design challenge faced in the class of Littoral Combat Ships. Read More

The Heart of the Navy's Next Destroyer

The Heart of the Navy’s Next Destroyer

The Aegis-class destroyer USS Hopper (DDG-70) launches a standard missile (SM) 3 Blk IA in July 2009. US Navy Photo

The Aegis-class destroyer USS Hopper (DDG-70) launches a standard missile (SM) 3 Blk IA in July 2009. US Navy Photo

When the first new Flight III Arleigh Burke-class destroyer enters service with the U.S. Navy in 2019, it will be equipped with a new radar roughly 30 times more powerful than the long-serving Lockheed Martin SPY-1 system found on current Aegis warships. Called the air and missile defense radar (AMDR), the new sensor is expected to exponentially increase the ship’s performance in simultaneously defending the Fleet against both air-breathing and ballistic-missile threats. The key technology that enables such high performance is a semiconductor called gallium nitride (GaN).

“It is definitely one of the key enabling technologies,” said Captain Douglas Small, Naval Sea Systems Command’s AMDR program manager, during an interview with USNI News. “We’re basically in the Flight III going to deliver over 30 times the radar capability for about twice the input power.” Read More

Opinion: American Seapower Must Look to the Future

Opinion: American Seapower Must Look to the Future

Seaman Apprentice Robert Nunez, left, from Suffolk, Va., and Seaman Apprentice Amy M. Haskins, from Kansas City, Mo., stand watch on the signal bridge aboard the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN-68). US Navy Photo

Seaman Apprentice Robert Nunez, left, from Suffolk, Va., and Seaman Apprentice Amy M. Haskins, from Kansas City, Mo., stand watch on the signal bridge aboard the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN-68). US Navy Photo

As I consider the likely national security issues facing the United States in the coming decade, I am struck by the decidedly maritime character of these challenges. From China’s rapid naval modernization to Iran’s threat to close the Strait of Hormuz to international shipping, the United States is increasingly facing a security environment requiring robust naval and air forces.

While the previous decade was characterized by the predominance of large ground forces, I firmly believe that the next decade will be defined by the strength of our sea power and projection forces. Read More

GAO: ‘Pause Needed’ in LCS Acquisition

GAO: ‘Pause Needed’ in LCS Acquisition

 

The littoral combat ship USS Independence (LCS 2) demonstrates its maneuvering capabilities in the Pacific Ocean on July 18, 2013. US Navy Photo

The littoral combat ship USS Independence (LCS-2) demonstrates its maneuvering capabilities in the Pacific Ocean on July 18, 2013. US Navy Photo

A long-awaited report from the Government Accountability Office (GAO) says “a pause is needed,” in the Navy’s acquisition of both variants of the littoral combat ship (LCS) until the service proves it has overcome the myriad difficulties it has had fielding the ships and their three proposed mission packages, which allow the ships to act as either minesweepers, sub-hunters, or close-to-shore combatants. Read More

Freedom Back Underway After Saturday Propulsion Failure

Freedom Back Underway After Saturday Propulsion Failure

 A sailor troubleshoots a ship's service diesel generator aboard the Freedom on July 20. US Navy Photo

A sailor troubleshoots a ship’s service diesel generator aboard the Freedom on July 20. US Navy Photo

USS Freedom (LCS-1) is back underway following a Saturday failure of the ships electrical generators that robbed the ship of propulsion power, Navy officials told USNI News on Wednesday.

According to the service, two of the four of the ships Isotta Fraschini V1708 diesel electrical generators overheated and shutdown. The generators provide electrical power to the ship’s systems that can affect the ship’s propulsion. Read More