Home » News & Analysis » Navy Christens DDG-1001, Named For Medal Of Honor Recipient SEAL Michael Monsoor


Navy Christens DDG-1001, Named For Medal Of Honor Recipient SEAL Michael Monsoor

Sally Monsoor christens the future USS Michael Monsoor (DDG 1001), which is named in honor of her son, Medal of Honor recipient Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class (SEAL) Michael A. Monsoor. US Navy photo.

Sally Monsoor christens the future USS Michael Monsoor (DDG 1001), which is named in honor of her son, Medal of Honor recipient Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class (SEAL) Michael A. Monsoor. US Navy photo.

The Navy on Saturday christened the guided missile destroyer USS Michael Monsoor (DDG-1001), named in honor of a Navy SEAL who was awarded the Medal of Honor for heroism in Iraq.

Monsoor recognizes the service and sacrifice of Petty Officer 2nd Class (SEAL) Michael A. Monsoor, who was killed when he jumped on an enemy hand grenade to save his comrades during combat in Ramadi, Iraq, in 2006.

Sally Monsoor, petty officer Monsoor’s mother, smashed the traditional bottle of sparkling wine across the bow to formally christen the ship during the June 18 ceremony at the General Dynamics Bath Iron Works shipyard in Bath, Maine.

“DDG-1001 is an extremely capable and versatile ship with an incredible namesake,” Undersecretary of the Navy Janine Davidson said at the ceremony.
“I have every confidence that the ship and crew will both live up to and honor Petty Officer Monsoor’s legacy as the ship’s motto implies –You Never Quit.”

Maine’s two U.S. senators, Susan Collins (R) and Angus King (I), also honored Monsoor in their brief remarks.

Sally Monsoor, in blue, sponsor of the future USS Michael Monsoor (DDG 1001), holds the christening bottle alongside the ship’s commanding officer, Capt. Scott Smith, her matrons of honor and Fred Harris, president of General Dynamics Bath Iron Works, which built the Zumwalt-class destroyer named in honor of Medal of Honor recipient Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class (SEAL) Michael A. Monsoor. US Navy photo.

Sally Monsoor, in blue, sponsor of the future USS Michael Monsoor (DDG 1001), holds the christening bottle alongside the ship’s commanding officer, Capt. Scott Smith, her matrons of honor and Fred Harris, president of General Dynamics Bath Iron Works, which built the Zumwalt-class destroyer named in honor of Medal of Honor recipient Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class (SEAL) Michael A. Monsoor. US Navy photo.

Monsoor is the second ship in the Zumwalt class of futuristic guided missile destroyers, which have a stealth design that gives the 610-foot-long, 15,000-ton warship the radar cross section of a fishing boat. The Zumwalt ships are armed with two 155mm guns to provide long-range, precise fire support for Marines ashore and have an integrated power system that drives the ship and energizes all of its housekeeping and combat systems. Monsoor will be prepared for builder’s trials and then Navy acceptance trials later this year and is expected to be delivered to the Navy in 2017.

The lead ship, DDG-1000, is named for the late Adm. Elmo Zumwalt, who was chief of naval operations in 1970-74. Zumwalt completed its Navy acceptance trials June 17 and will be commissioned into Navy service in Baltimore, Md., in October before sailing for its home port in San Diego.

The third and final ship in the class, DDG-1002, will be named for the late President Lyndon B. Johnson, who served briefly in the Navy during World War II. It is under construction at Bath and is scheduled for commissioning in 2018.

Fred Harris, president of Bath shipyard, said “we all understand the importance of what we do – building ships that protect our sailors and Marines, providing them the best possible tools to do their jobs safely.”

  • RobM1981

    Great photo.

    God bless the Monsoor, and all who serve on her.

  • old guy

    May his namesake isplay the same qualities as he did.

  • Bob Washburn

    While I applaud the Navy for naming DD1000 and DD1001 for a CNO and a Seal, naming DD1003 for Lindon Johnson was a horrible choice. Johnson’s Navy service was a sham, at least according to Robert Caro, the Johnson biographer.
    Lindon got himself a commission, then flew the Pacific theater during WWII, where he flew out as a passenger on a recon mission, thus “earning” a combat medal.
    Johnson was one corrupt hombre and Mabus should be ashamed of the naming decision.