Tag Archives: future surface combatant

Navy, Marines Eyeing Ship Capability Upgrade Plans that Focus on Weapons, C5I

Navy, Marines Eyeing Ship Capability Upgrade Plans that Focus on Weapons, C5I

The amphibious assault ship USS America (LHA 6) and the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Hopper (DDG 70) steam in formation while participating in a photo exercise in the Arabian Gulf on Nov. 28, 2017. US Navy Photo

ARLINGTON, Va. – The Navy and Marine Corps are eyeing upgrade plans for their surface combatants and amphibious ships to help guide the development of weapons, sensors, networks and more that will support those ships in a future operating environment. Read More

No New Round Planned For Zumwalt Destroyer Gun System; Navy Monitoring Industry

No New Round Planned For Zumwalt Destroyer Gun System; Navy Monitoring Industry

Guided-missile destroyer Zumwalt (DDG-1000) arrives at Naval Station Newport on Sept. 8, 2016. US Navy Photo

ARLINGTON, Va. — A year after the Navy decided to abandon the Long Range Land Attack Projectile (LRLAP) for the Zumwalt-class guided-missile destroyer, there is no plan in place for a replacement round for the Advanced Gun System (AGS) the ships are built around, service officials said on Wednesday. Read More

Top Stories 2017: U.S. Navy Acquisition and Maintenance

Top Stories 2017: U.S. Navy Acquisition and Maintenance

USNI News polled its writers, naval analysts and service members on what they consider the most important military and maritime stories in 2017.

The following is part of a series. Please also see Top Stories: International AcquisitionNavy OperationsMarine Corps OperationsMarine Corps and Coast Guard AcquisitionInternational Operations and New Administration

2017 began with the promise of planning for a larger fleet: at the end of 2016, the Navy announced a 355-ship requirement, and the incoming Trump Administration expressed its support for a larger military and a heftier Navy. Few concrete steps were taken this year, though, to begin a buildup – though many programs that will be pivotal to the 355-ship fleet of the future reached significant programmatic milestones in 2017. 

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New Requirements for DDG-1000 Focus on Surface Strike

New Requirements for DDG-1000 Focus on Surface Strike

The guided-missile destroyer USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) arrives at its new homeport in San Diego on Dec. 8, 2016. US Navy photo.

The Navy is revamping the Zumwalt-class destroyer’s requirements and will morph it into a focused surface strike platform, the director of surface warfare (OPNAV N96) told USNI News today. Read More

Wargames This Year To Inform Future Surface Combatant Requirements

Wargames This Year To Inform Future Surface Combatant Requirements

The guided-missile destroyers USS Russel (DDG 59), USS Chung Hoon (DDG 93) and the guided-missile cruiser USS Mobile Bay (CG 53) follow the aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) during a show of force transit on Aug. 11, 2015. US Navy photo.

The guided-missile destroyers USS Russel (DDG-59), USS Chung Hoon (DDG-93) and the guided-missile cruiser USS Mobile Bay (CG-53) follow the aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis (CVN-74) during a show of force transit on Aug. 11, 2015. US Navy photo.

The Navy is already conducting wargames in preparation for the Future Surface Combatant family of systems acquisition process to begin later this year, several officials involved said last week. Read More

Navy to Impose More Rigorous Oversight in New Ship Classes; Will Hire More Engineers

Navy to Impose More Rigorous Oversight in New Ship Classes; Will Hire More Engineers

USS Zumwalt (DDG-1000) steams in formation with USS Independence (LCS-2) on Dec. 8, 2016. US Navy Photo

USS Zumwalt (DDG-1000) steams in formation with USS Independence (LCS-2) on Dec. 8, 2016. US Navy Photo

The Navy will need a larger engineering directorate as it grows the fleet in coming years, to avoid problems faced in past ship classes like the Littoral Combat Ship and the Zumwalt guided missile destroyer stemming from the Navy being too hands-off on technical specifications. Read More

CNO: Arctic Operations Limited Now, But Future Ship Designs Should Consider Environment

CNO: Arctic Operations Limited Now, But Future Ship Designs Should Consider Environment

Los Angeles-class submarine USS Hartford (SSN-768), surfaces near Ice Camp Sargo during Ice Exercise (ICEX) 2016 on March 15, 2016. US Navy photo.

Los Angeles-class submarine USS Hartford (SSN-768) surfaces near Ice Camp Sargo during Ice Exercise (ICEX) 2016 on March 15, 2016. US Navy photo.

The U.S. Navy’s presence in the Arctic region has been limited due to constrained budgets and urgent needs elsewhere in the world, the chief of naval operations said, but future ships should still be designed with potential Arctic operations in mind. Read More

Navy: Affordability, Commonality Needed To Address Near, Long-Term Shipbuilding Challenges

Navy: Affordability, Commonality Needed To Address Near, Long-Term Shipbuilding Challenges

The littoral combat ship USS Fort Worth (LCS 3), front, the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyers USS Michael Murphy (DDG 112) and USS John S. McCain (DDG 56), the Republic of Korea navy destroyer ROKS Eulji Mundeok (DDH 972), and the Ulsan-class frigate ROKS Jeju (FF 958) participate in a joint photo exercise during Foal Eagle 2015. Both the DDGs and LCSs are under construction now but will need replacement programs beginning in the mid-2030s. US Navy photo.

The littoral combat ship USS Fort Worth (LCS-3), front, the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyers USS Michael Murphy (DDG-112) and USS John S. McCain (DDG-56), the Republic of Korea navy destroyer ROKS Eulji Mundeok (DDH-972), and the Ulsan-class frigate ROKS Jeju (FF-958) participate in a joint photo exercise during Foal Eagle 2015. Both the DDGs and LCSs are under construction now but will need replacement programs beginning in the mid-2030s. US Navy photo.

ARLINGTON, Va. — The Navy is in the midst of a massive shipbuilding spree, with 65 ships across eight shipyards under contract or in construction today – but maintaining that pace in the short-term and trying to replicate or even accelerate it for the next generation of surface combatants presents the Navy and industry with some serious challenges, officials said. Read More