Tag Archives: Brookings Institution

Admiral: Navy Can Afford to Field a 310-Ship Fleet, Not 355

Admiral: Navy Can Afford to Field a 310-Ship Fleet, Not 355

A loved one watches as the guided-missile destroyer USS Gonzalez (DDG 66) departs Naval Station Norfolk on March 15, 2019. US Navy Photo

ARLINGTON, Va. – The Navy is unlikely to field a 355-ship fleet in the near- or even mid-term future if funding doesn’t change dramatically, the department’s top leadership said during a pair of appearances last week.

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Marine Who Led ISIS Fight Says Threat Still Remains

Marine Who Led ISIS Fight Says Threat Still Remains

A U.S. Marine with 3rd Battalion, 7th Marine Regiment, attached to Special Purpose Marine Air-Ground Task Force, Crisis Response-Central Command, prepares to board an MV-22 Osprey at a site near At-Tanf Garrison, Syria, Sept. 7, 2018. US Marine Corps Photo

ISIS might have lost control of its last territorial stronghold in March, but the retired Marine Corps general who led American efforts to defeat the terrorist organization five years ago says the group remains much alive.

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Joint Chiefs Chairman Says Iran Threat In Middle East Was Real

Joint Chiefs Chairman Says Iran Threat In Middle East Was Real

Gen. Joseph F. Dunford, Jr., chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, at the Brookings Institute Feb. 23, 2017 in Washington, D.C. DoD Photo

Gen. Joseph F. Dunford, Jr., chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. DoD Photo

WASHINGTON, D.C. — The Abraham Lincoln carrier strike group, B-52 bombers and sophisticated air defense systems were rushed to the Middle East in early May because intelligence suggested an Iranian-led “campaign plan” taking shape to disrupt the region, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of staff said Wednesday.

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Panel: Navy May Have to Choose Between New Ballistic Missile Subs or 355 Ship Fleet

Panel: Navy May Have to Choose Between New Ballistic Missile Subs or 355 Ship Fleet

Gold crew of the Ohio-class ballistic-missile submarine USS Louisiana (SSBN-743) arrives home to Naval Base Kitsap-Bangor, Wash. US Navy Photo

The Navy could be forced to make hard choices sooner rather than later when it comes to finding the money to replace its aging ballistic missile submarines or reach its goal of having a fleet of 355 warships, a panel of security and budgetary experts said this week. Read More

Panel: Military Tensions in Europe Continue to Run High Between NATO, Moscow

Panel: Military Tensions in Europe Continue to Run High Between NATO, Moscow

A Danish soldier (left) coaches a U.S. Army Soldier with the 82nd Brigade Engineer Battalion, 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division, as he uses a Danish M60 Machine Gun during a multinational weapons training session in Tapa, Estonia on March 10, 2018. US Army Photo

The admission of the Baltic nations of Lithuania, Estonia and Latvia to NATO was the “fattest of red line” warnings to Russia to stay clear of the western European military, a transatlantic expert on foreign policy and security on Wednesday. But that move has not tempered tensions on the continent as both NATO and Moscow have stepped up military operations. Read More

Experts Weigh the Future of the Pentagon’s Space Force

Experts Weigh the Future of the Pentagon’s Space Force

The U.S. Air Force 45th Space Wing supported SpaceX’s successful launch of NASA’s Commercial Resupply Mission 13 aboard a Falcon 9 rocket from Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS), Florida, Dec. 15, 2017. DoD Photo

The Trump administration’s push to create a U.S. Space Force could be more like a Space Corps– similar to the Marine Corps – or a separate combatant command, a panel of national security experts predicted on Monday. Read More

Panel: Taiwan Defense Spending Doesn't Back Up Taipei's Rhetoric

Panel: Taiwan Defense Spending Doesn’t Back Up Taipei’s Rhetoric

Undated Photo of Taiwanese troops using U.S. equipment.

Taiwan, faced with a more aggressive China, is talking a good game of ramping up the island’s security with its own submarines, buying sophisticated fighter aircraft and exploring asymmetric defenses, but President Tsai Ing-wen’s administration has not made the hard choices to raise a defense budget that already is being consumed by higher personnel costs, an expert panel agreed on Wednesday. Read More