Home » Aviation » USS Carl Vinson Conducts V-22 Operations For Deck Crew, Pilot Familiarization


USS Carl Vinson Conducts V-22 Operations For Deck Crew, Pilot Familiarization

An MV-22B Osprey from Marine Operational Test and Evaluation Squadron 1 lifts off from the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) on June 12, 2016. US Navy photo.

An MV-22B Osprey from Marine Operational Test and Evaluation Squadron 1 lifts off from the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) on June 12, 2016. US Navy photo.

The aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) got an early start preparing for the carrier onboard delivery (COD) transition from the C-2 Greyhound to the V-22 Osprey, with the ship’s crew bringing in the tiltrotor aircraft to participate in the command assessment of readiness and training (CARAT) II basic training event.

An Osprey from the Marine Operational Test and Evaluation Squadron (VMX) 1 came in for landings and takeoffs on Vinson on June 12 in what was not a test event required by the V-22 COD acquisition office but rather an operational Navy-directed event, USNI News understands.

“As we phase out the C-2s and start implementing the V-22s, during this evaluation phase, this is the first time our sailors have had a chance to directly deal with a new aircraft,” Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Handling) 3rd Class Trell Matthias, an aircraft director assigned to Vinson‘s Air Department, V-1 Division, said in a Navy statement. The V-22s generally operate off amphibious ships, though Naval Air Systems Command has run a series of tests and certifications to allow for operations off supply ships, destroyers, aircraft carriers and other ship classes in the fleet.
“Aside from the increased prop exhaust, I thought it was almost the same as landing a helicopter.”

An MV-22B Osprey from Marine Operational Test and Evaluation Squadron 1 prepares to lift off from the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) on June 12, 2016.

An MV-22B Osprey from Marine Operational Test and Evaluation Squadron 1 prepares to lift off from the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) on June 12, 2016.

The test event also let the Marine Corps V-22 pilots practice landing on a new type of ship, with its own flight deck configuration, procedures and crew expertise.

“These operations present an opportunity for our flight crews to gain experience landing on an aircraft carrier as opposed to landing on an amphibious ship,” Marine Corps Lt. Col. Brett Hart, VMX-1 executive officer, said in the Navy statement. “It allows us to become accustomed to a different set of operating procedures, and additionally allows air department sailors on board Carl Vinson to become accustomed to landing and handling tilt rotor aircraft.”

Whereas the C-2 Greyhound turboprop plane requires a short runway with arresting gear and a catapult launch to get on and off the aircraft carrier, the V-22 can land vertically, meaning it can land on any ship’s flight deck that is strong enough to support the weight and heat of the aircraft. The Navy has not announced an operating concept for the Navy-variant Osprey, called the CMV-22B, but it would be technically capable of moving goods and people around the entire strike group as needed – compared to the C-2, which can only make deliveries between the shore and the carrier, leaving smaller helicopters to move goods from the carrier to other ships when needed.

“With the incorporation of the V-22, I think the fleet will also see additional capabilities from the entire group at-large, because we now have the option of taking cargo and personnel to some of the smaller decks without first having to come to the aircraft carrier,” Hart said in the statement. “With that considered, the carrier can expect to have potentially more flight deck and air space freed up, allowing it to launch more sorties in support of combat operations.”

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An MV-22B Osprey from Marine Operational Test and Evaluation Squadron 1 lands on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) on June 12, 2016. US Navy photo.

Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) this spring awarded Bell-Boeing a contract to begin engineering the Navy-variant V-22. It will have an extended-range fuel tank, a high-frequency beyond-line-of-sight radio, and a public address system for passengers in the back of the aircraft. The Navy will buy the first COD replacements in Fiscal Year 2018 and expects to field them in FY 2020.

  • Jacek Zemło

    I suppose the PR events for V-22 are carefully planned, but I still can’t understand some details about this flying THING:

    1) Rumours say the size of the Osprey’s cargo bay is too small for carrying replacement engines for F-35C (one of the main reasons why V-22 has been choosen!) internally, so it would have to carry such an oversized load on an external hook.

    2) Another statement says having not enough of the payload/power combination Osprey may use short take-off instead of vertical one, but I guess with no external load hanging under the belly then.

    3) Also, it’s hard to imagine short (not vertical) landing with a (sealed?) jet engine on the cargo hook.

    4) Navy’s CMV-22B is reportedly going to carry more fuel for having much much longer range than Marine MV-22B, new tanks can take some space and weight.

    So, the question is: Will Osprey be able to carry the declared load at the required distance, taking-off and landing vertically (IGE)? Or is having it on the carrier decks just a “forced innovation”?

  • Rob C

    i think their going just use Osprey same as they did with F/A-18 when it was remaded as a “Super” to replace the F-14. It not great at living up to the specialist it’s replacing. Its just what they have on hand that easier to get through Congress than trying desperately to get it approve for production of a new design. It’s sadly in my own opinion the simple reason why slightly upgraded V-22 is being used as replacement for C2. C2 was awfully noisy when your riding in that thing. That’s properly only plus the crew using V-22 going get. I think it will be a squeeze to put one these things into the hangar and maintain them. I have no doubt its not as capable as C-2.

  • Donald Carey

    It must have been hard on the Osprey’s pilot – having such a large space to land in! ;p

  • b2

    All spin. No critical reasoning, no journalism and all USMC-Bell-HASC head propaganda to keep the line open!

    Osprey would be a nice vertrep mission addition- not as a replacement for COD, especially now that we have moved back to Green/Blue water supposedly.

    The USMC does a good job forcing square pegs into round holes for itself. This time it is the Navy’s hole, again. Look at the national treasure being spent to outfit them with the most expensive log bird ever developed, the V-22, the H-53K we know nothing about yet and the biggest pig in the poke ever, the F-35B. The USMC would call IOC on a model of the Starship Enterprise! Declaring IOC is like taking a hill to them. I would hope real naval aviation (IE- carrier power projection aviation) has some cohunes to vet this idea carefully before they let it come aboard….most likely not based on two decades of being pushed around.