Home » Aviation » Navy FY 2016 Budget Request Funds Washington Carrier Refueling, 12th San Antonio


Navy FY 2016 Budget Request Funds Washington Carrier Refueling, 12th San Antonio

An E/A-18G Growler from the Scorpions of Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 132 flies by the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS George Washington (CVN-73).

An E/A-18G Growler from the Scorpions of Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 132 flies by the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS George Washington (CVN-73).

PENTAGON – In its Fiscal Year 2016 budget submission to Congress, the Department of the Navy (DoN) asked for $168 billion, a more than five percent increase over last year’s $159 billion request.

The submission is line a with a larger Pentagon budget that pledges to reverse five years of defense spending reductions, deputy secretary of defense Bob Work said last week.

The DoN beefed up spending across almost all major budget lines including personnel, shipbuilding, aircraft procurement and operations and maintenance over the 2015 submission.

Shipbuilding

USS Arlington (LPD-24) under construction at Ingalls Shipbuilding. Huntington Ingalls Industries Photo

USS Arlington (LPD-24) under construction at Ingalls Shipbuilding. Huntington Ingalls Industries Photo

The Navy answered lingering shipbuilding questions left over from the FY 2015 budget deliberations by ensuring funding for the refueling of the service’s USS George Washington (CVN-73) carrier and fully funded a 12th San Antonio-class (LPD-17) amphibious warship following insertion of funds for both by last year’s FY 2015 omnibus government funding bill.

In shipbuilding, the Navy is requesting $16.6 billion for nine new ships and the refueling and complex overhaul of the Nimitz-class carrier USS George Washington (CVN-73).

The budget maintains the two-a-year build rate for Virginia-class submarines (SSN-774), as well as $3.1 billion for two Arleigh Burke-class (DDG-51) guided missile destroyer, $1.4 billion for three Littoral Combat Ships, a 12th San Antonio-class amphibious warship (LPD-17) the first of the Navy’s next generation fleet oiler – T-AO(X). The budget also pays $256 million for five Ship-to-Shore connectors as a replacement for the service’s aging fleet of landing hovercraft.

The Navy also set aside $2.5 billion for continued design and construction of the second Gerald R. Ford-class (CVN-78) carrier John F. Kennedy (CVN-79) and advanced procurement for Enterprise.

Aviation

An E-2D lands on the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69). US Navy Photo

An E-2D lands on the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69). US Navy Photo

In aviation procurement, the Navy and Marine Corps asked for 13 Lockheed Martin F-35 Lighting II Joint Strike Fighters (JSF) – 9 F-35B short takeoff and vertical landing (STOVL) Marine variant and 4 F-35C carrier JSFs.

The Navy is also buying 16 Boeing P-8A Poseidon maritime surveillance aircraft and five Northrop Grumman E-2D Advanced Hawkeye carrier-based information, surveillance and reconnaissance aircraft and two Lockheed Martin KC-130J cargo aircraft for the Marines.

The Navy did not ask for money to fund additional Boeing F-18G Growler electronic attack aircraft.

In helicopters, the Navy is asking for 29 MH-60R helos. The Marines are asking for a mix of 28 AH-1Z Viper and UH-1Y Venoms and 19 MV-22B tilt-rotor Ospreys.

Starting in FY 2018, the Navy will start buying eight V-22s a year to replace the Northrop C-2A Greyhound for the carrier onboard delivery (COD) vehicle for the Navy’s carriers.

In the realm of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), the Navy is buying three Northrop MQ-4 Tritons and two Northrop MQ-8C Fire Scouts in FY 2016 and seven Black Jack UAVs for the Marine Corps.

Research and Development

Afloat Forward Staging Base (Interim) USS Ponce (ASB(I) 15) conducts an operational demonstration of the Office of Naval Research (ONR)-sponsored Laser Weapon System (LaWS). US Navy Photo

Afloat Forward Staging Base (Interim) USS Ponce (ASB(I) 15) conducts an operational demonstration of the Office of Naval Research (ONR)-sponsored Laser Weapon System (LaWS). US Navy Photo

The DoN requested a $17.9 billion research and development budget — almost $2 billion over FY 2015 — including $1.39 billion for Ohio-class replacement R&D and $283 million mainly focused on developing the Virginia Payload Module (VPM) that would expand the missile capacity of the Virginia-class submarines in the Navy’s planned Block V boats.

The service included $242 million research to integrate the Air and Missile Defense Radar (AMDR) into the planned Flight III Arleigh Burke guided missile destroyer.

The Navy also included a modest $135 million for the Unmanned Carrier-Launched Airborne Surveillance and Strike (UCLASS), which was a contentious program for the service on the Hill last year. Last year the service budgeted $403 million for UCLASS.

Personnel, Operations and Maintenance

Sailors prepare to man the rails on the flight deck of the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS George Washington (CVN-73) on Nov. 25, 2014. US Navy Photo

Sailors prepare to man the rails on the flight deck of the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS George Washington (CVN-73) on Nov. 25, 2014. US Navy Photo

The Navy has increased its personnel budget by almost a $1 billion from FY 2015 to a topline request of $28.3 billion in a quest for 330,000 sailors by the end of the five year Future Years Defense Plan (FYDP).

The Marines requested $13.1 billion for personnel for a planned FY 2016 end strength of 182,000 by FY 2020.

The Navy budgeted $42.2 billion for operations and maintenance (O&M) in FY 2016 and the Marines budgeted $6.2 billion. Both are increases over the FY 2015 request.

  • Secundius

    Has anyone considered “Slushing the Fuel”, keeping the fuel in a semi-frozen state. Allows you to carry more fuel increasing the range…

  • Quackers

    Nx the refueling of the GW. The new carrier CVN78 could be ready before the GW completes its
    Upgrade and refueling, maybe!!!. Four years the CVN78 should be finished. There maybe problems
    With the refueling and the cost goes up up up. Maybe

    • Secundius

      @ Quackers.

      I disagree. GW is a proven, working class warfighter. Ford, isn’t. If Ford breaks down at sea, her usefulness just dropped to 0%. Ford is still a “Test In Progress” design, she has to prove herself first. I’d rather send deploy a ship that WILL work, than a ship that MIGHT work…

      • muzzleloader

        Well said. I find it interesting that there are no F/G- 18’s in the procurement rolls. It would seem the Navy is going all in on the F-35.

        • Secundius

          @ muzzleloader.

          “G” meaning EA-18G Growler’s.

    • Curtis Conway

      Ford represent risk at this point and the corner has not been turned yet. Nimitz Class Carriers are well understood. Very little risk here.

    • Rob C.

      They still haven’t worked out the problems with the Ford. I would rather have them refuel the George Washington and than to purchase a ship with alot of bugs that haven’t been worked out on the lead ship.

  • Secundius

    I just read a DoD Budget Requirement Report for 2016, and GW got its New Shoes…

  • Rob C.

    Budget must be still tight if their still willing do away with purchasing with more EA-18 Fighter jammer aircraft. F-35’s still need electronic cover to enhance their stealth capacities.

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