Tag Archives: USS Freedom

USS Fort Worth Successfully Tested Overseas Maintenance Outside of Singapore Hub

USS Fort Worth Successfully Tested Overseas Maintenance Outside of Singapore Hub

USS Fort Worth (LCS-3), bottom, the guided missile destroyer USS Sampson (DDG-102) in the Java Sea on Jan. 14, 2015. US Navy Photo

USS Fort Worth (LCS-3), bottom, the guided missile destroyer USS Sampson (DDG-102) in the Java Sea on Jan. 14, 2015. US Navy Photo

The second Freedom-class Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) has proven so much more reliable than the first that the Navy has been able to experiment with a new expeditionary maintenance model to extend the reach of the ship, the program executive officer for LCS told USNI News last week. Read More

PEO LCS Looking at 2016 Deployment of Anti-Sub Package Ahead of Reaching IOC

PEO LCS Looking at 2016 Deployment of Anti-Sub Package Ahead of Reaching IOC

An MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopter embarked aboard USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76) passes by USS Independence (LCS 2) during Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2014. US Navy photo.

An MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopter embarked aboard USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76) passes by USS Independence (LCS 2) during Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2014. US Navy photo.

WASHINGTON, D.C. — The Program Executive Officer for Littoral Combat Ships (LCS) hopes to send a version of the anti-submarine warfare (ASW) mission package out to sea before officially reaching initial operational capability, as earlier testing showed “phenomenal” capability compared to current systems. Read More

Document: GAO Report on USS Freedom Deployment

Document: GAO Report on USS Freedom Deployment

USS Freedom (LCS-1) underway in August 2013. US Navy Photo

USS Freedom (LCS-1) underway in August 2013. US Navy Photo

The following is a the Government Accountability Office report, Deployment of USS Freedom Revealed Risks in Implementing Operational Concepts and Uncertain Costs. The report was released on July 8, 2014. Read More

Document: Congressional Research Service Navy Littoral Combat Ship Program Report

Document: Congressional Research Service Navy Littoral Combat Ship Program Report

From the Congressional Research Service Sept. 27, 2013 Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) report:The LCS program has become controversial due to past cost growth, design and construction issues with the lead ships built to each design, concerns over the ships’ ability to withstand battle damage, and concerns over whether the ships are sufficiently armed and would be able to perform their stated missions effectively. Some observers, citing one or more of these issues, have proposed truncating the LCS program to either 24 ships (i.e., stopping procurement after procuring all the ships covered under the two block buy contracts) or to some other number well short of 52. Other observers have proposed down selecting to a single LCS design (i.e., continuing production of only one of the two designs) after the 24th ship. Read More

Report: LCS Manning Could Permanently Increase by 2015

Report: LCS Manning Could Permanently Increase by 2015

 Cmdr. Pat Thien, left, Commanding Officer of the littoral combat ship USS Freedom (LCS-1) on Aug. 13, 2013.

Cmdr. Pat Thien, left, Commanding Officer of the littoral combat ship USS Freedom (LCS-1) on Aug. 13, 2013.

The Navy is considering increasing the crew sizes for both variants of the Littoral Combat Ships (LCS) by 2015, according to a July report obtained by USNI News based on the early data from the current deployment of USS Freedom (LCS-1) and tests aboard USS Independence (LCS-2).

The report — prepared on the Office of Chief of Operations (OPNAV) surface warfare office — recommends the Navy add accommodations to berth 98 crewmembers ahead of a 2014 study that could increase the crew’s size. Read More

Opinion: Navy's Littoral Combat Ship Challenges the Status Quo

Opinion: Navy’s Littoral Combat Ship Challenges the Status Quo

USS Freedom (LCS 1) gets underway. Freedom is underway as part of the Republic of Singapore Navy's Western Pacific Multi-lateral Sea Exercise (WMSX). US Navy Photo

USS Freedom (LCS 1) gets underway. Freedom is underway as part of the Republic of Singapore Navy’s Western Pacific Multi-lateral Sea Exercise (WMSX). US Navy Photo

The world is a dynamic and uncertain place where threats can come from anywhere. Accordingly, the U.S. Navy’s missions have evolved to include defeating terrorists, pirates and illegal traffickers; preparing to counter mines and armed small boats; providing humanitarian assistance and disaster relief; and building partnerships to take on maritime-security missions. Read More

GAO: ‘Pause Needed’ in LCS Acquisition

GAO: ‘Pause Needed’ in LCS Acquisition

 

The littoral combat ship USS Independence (LCS 2) demonstrates its maneuvering capabilities in the Pacific Ocean on July 18, 2013. US Navy Photo

The littoral combat ship USS Independence (LCS-2) demonstrates its maneuvering capabilities in the Pacific Ocean on July 18, 2013. US Navy Photo

A long-awaited report from the Government Accountability Office (GAO) says “a pause is needed,” in the Navy’s acquisition of both variants of the littoral combat ship (LCS) until the service proves it has overcome the myriad difficulties it has had fielding the ships and their three proposed mission packages, which allow the ships to act as either minesweepers, sub-hunters, or close-to-shore combatants. Read More

Freedom Back Underway After Saturday Propulsion Failure

Freedom Back Underway After Saturday Propulsion Failure

 A sailor troubleshoots a ship's service diesel generator aboard the Freedom on July 20. US Navy Photo

A sailor troubleshoots a ship’s service diesel generator aboard the Freedom on July 20. US Navy Photo

USS Freedom (LCS-1) is back underway following a Saturday failure of the ships electrical generators that robbed the ship of propulsion power, Navy officials told USNI News on Wednesday.

According to the service, two of the four of the ships Isotta Fraschini V1708 diesel electrical generators overheated and shutdown. The generators provide electrical power to the ship’s systems that can affect the ship’s propulsion. Read More