Top Stories

Navy, Marines Step Up Training to Prepare for High-End Fight

Navy, Marines Step Up Training to Prepare for High-End Fight

A U.S. Marine with 1st Combat Engineer Battalion and Japan Ground Self Defense Soldier with the Western Army Infantry Regiment, clear hallways while conducting Urban Explosive Demolitions training during exercise Iron Fist 2018, Jan. 19. US Marine Corps Photo

SAN DIEGO, Calif. — Navy type commanders have boosted the quality of their training events to prepare for battle against a peer or near-peer competitor and continue to look for ways to make their training more complex and operationally relevant. Read More

Wittman: Armed Services Committee Won't Accept Proposed Navy Shipbuilding Plan; More Hulls Needed

Wittman: Armed Services Committee Won’t Accept Proposed Navy Shipbuilding Plan; More Hulls Needed

Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Handling) Airman Austin Kreilis, assigned to the air department aboard the amphibious assault ship USS America (LHA 6), signals an MV-22 Osprey to lift off from the flight deck. US Navy photo.

CAPITOL HILL – The House Armed Services Committee will not accept a Navy shipbuilding plan of anything lower than 13 ships and $26 billion in Fiscal Year 2019, a subcommittee chairman said, suggesting HASC may add several ships beyond what the Navy requested earlier this week. Read More

Navy Buildup Partially Rests on More Forward-Deployed LCSs; Supported by More Accurate Manpower Funding

Navy Buildup Partially Rests on More Forward-Deployed LCSs; Supported by More Accurate Manpower Funding

Littoral combat ship USS Coronado (LCS-4) transits the Bohol Sea on June, 22 2017, US Navy Photo

WASHINGTON, D.C. — The Navy intends to support a near-term increase in ship inventory and deployed forces by forward-deploying some ships with rotational crews, tackling often-overlooked manpower costs and reestablishing the readiness squadron concept. However, many questions still remain about the feasibility of the buildup in force structure and operations at sea. Read More

Adm. Swift: Pacific Fleet Should Both Train and Operate Forces

Adm. Swift: Pacific Fleet Should Both Train and Operate Forces

Adm. Scott H. Swift, commander of U.S. Pacific Fleet, delivers remarks during a change of command and retirement ceremony as Vice Adm. Nora W. Tyson prepares to relinquish command of U.S. 3rd Fleet. US Navy Photo

SAN DIEGO, Calif. — The commander of U.S. Pacific Fleet pushed back against recent discussions that he shouldn’t both prepare and operate ready forces and that force-generation should be concentrated at U.S. Fleet Forces Command on the East Coast. Read More