Top Stories

Pentagon's Non-Lethal Weapons Office Pushing Gray-Zone Warfare Tools

Pentagon’s Non-Lethal Weapons Office Pushing Gray-Zone Warfare Tools

An Active Denial System from the Joint Non-Lethal Weapons Directorate is staged before conducting a counter personnel demo during Weapons and Tactics Instructor course (WTI) 2-17 at Site 50, Wellton, Ariz. on April 4, 2017. US Marine Corps Photo

MARINE CORPS BASE QUANTICO, Va. – The Pentagon’s Joint Non-Lethal Weapons Directorate is hoping to reframe the talk about non-lethal weapons amid a push by the Defense Department to boost lethality for high-end warfare. Read More

Navy, Marines Practice 'Littoral Combat Force' Construct in Alaska

Navy, Marines Practice ‘Littoral Combat Force’ Construct in Alaska

U.S. Marines with Marine Wing Support Squadron 371 set up at a forward arming and refueling point (FARP) as a CH-53E from Marine Heavy Helicopter Squadron 361 flies overhead during Arctic Expeditionary Capabilities Exercise (AECE) in Adak, Alaska on Sept. 18, 2019. US Marine Corps Photo

This post has been updated to include additional comments from U.S. 3rd Fleet.

The Navy and Marine Corps recently used a new Littoral Combat Force concept to command and control units spread over 2.2 million square miles of land and sea, in the latest demonstration of what a future operation near and on the shore might look like. Read More

Arrowhead Wins Cost Battle in U.K. Type-31 Frigate Competition

Arrowhead Wins Cost Battle in U.K. Type-31 Frigate Competition

Type-31 frigate design concept. Babcock Image

The following post has been updated to correct the cost of the Type-31 program. The U.K. plans to pay $1.6 billion for all five hulls, not $1.6 billion for each hull.

LONDON — The victory of the Babcock/Thales Arrowhead 140 design in Britain’s bargain-basement Type 31 frigate competition will give the Royal Navy a heavyweight fighter in the maritime security arena. Read More

Marines: Lack of Training, Command Problems Contributed to Fatal 2018 Crash off Japan

Marines: Lack of Training, Command Problems Contributed to Fatal 2018 Crash off Japan

(From top left, clockwise) Lt. Col. Kevin R. Herrmann, Maj. James M. Brophy, Staff Sgt. Maximo A. Flores, Cpl. Daniel E. Baker and Cpl. William C. Ross

The Marine Corps found that pilot error, inadequate oversight of training and operations and an unprofessional command climate contributed to the Dec. 6 crash of an F/A-18D Hornet and a KC-130J Super Hercules aircraft that killed six Marines and injured one. Read More

Navy Shortening Maintenance Times for Surface Ships, But Repair Industry Still Overloaded

Navy Shortening Maintenance Times for Surface Ships, But Repair Industry Still Overloaded

Master Chief Boatswain’s Mate Claus Moser communicates with sailors in the forecastle of the amphibious assault ship USS Makin Island (LHD-8) while off-loading the starboard anchor chain in 2017. US Navy Photo

SAN DIEGO, Calif – The Navy has a large backlog of surface ship maintenance it is trying to dig out of; that’s not new. And while the sea service and ship repair industry are making some progress in cutting back on administrative and other burdens that slow down maintenance availabilities, the contractors here in San Diego are so backed up that the Navy has received zero bids for several recent maintenance availabilities. Read More

Marine Planners Using Commandant's Guidance to Start Crafting Future of the Corps

Marine Planners Using Commandant’s Guidance to Start Crafting Future of the Corps

U.S. Marines with Task Force Koa Moana (TF KM) conducts a night live fire exercise during the TF KM Mission Rehearsal Exercise at Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, Calif. on July 19, 2018. US Marine Corps Photo

MARINE CORPS BASE QUANTICO, Va. – Two months after new Commandant of the Marine Corps Gen. David Berger released his commandant’s planning guidance, the Marines charged with plotting how the service will operate in the future showed a glimpse into how the new guidance is shaping their work. Read More

Electric Boat Preparing for Columbia-Class, But Supply Base Remains a Challenge

Electric Boat Preparing for Columbia-Class, But Supply Base Remains a Challenge

Attack boat Vermont (SSN-792) float-off on March 29, 2019. General Dynamics Electric Boats Photo

GROTON, Conn. – General Dynamics Electric Boat broke ground on a Columbia-class submarine assembly facility at its Groton yard on Friday, kicking off one of the final facilities improvement projects the company needs ahead of a massive increase in submarine construction work in the coming decades. Read More

Polar Security Cutter Fuses Performance Requirements With Maintenance Needs

Polar Security Cutter Fuses Performance Requirements With Maintenance Needs

An artist’s rendering of VT Halter Marine’s winning bid for the U.S. Coast Guard Polar Security Cutter. VT Halter Marine image used with permission

WASHINGTON, D.C. – By building a heavy icebreaker designed to both withstand the frigid waters and accommodate major maintenance needs, the Coast Guard hopes to avoid the catastrophic failures that have hamstrung the service’s polar missions for a nearly a decade. Read More

How to Seize Islands, Set Up a Forward Refueling Point: Marine Corps Recipes for Expeditionary Operations

How to Seize Islands, Set Up a Forward Refueling Point: Marine Corps Recipes for Expeditionary Operations

A Marine with Echo Company, Battalion Landing Team, 2nd Battalion, 1st Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, posts security during a simulated airfield seizure after a long-range raid from the amphibious assault ship USS Wasp (LHD 1) at Ie Shima Training Facility, Okinawa, Japan, Aug. 12, 2019. US Marine Corps photo.

The U.S. Marine Corps has been refining a pair of related concepts, Expeditionary Advance Base Operations (EABO) and the overarching Littoral Operations in a Contested Environment, for the past couple years. Read More