Tag Archives: Virginia class

Chinese Increasing Nuclear Submarine Shipyard Capacity

Chinese Increasing Nuclear Submarine Shipyard Capacity

H I Sutton Image. Used with permission

As China pushes to become a blue-water power, nuclear-powered submarines are critically important to Beijing’s plan. Historically the Chinese Navy’s (PLAN) nuclear-powered submarine fleet has been constrained by its limited construction capacity. There is only one shipyard in the country up to the task. But that yard has been undergoing a massive enlargement. And now, recent satellite imagery suggests an additional capacity expansion. Read More

Top Stories 2019: U.S. Navy Acquisition

Top Stories 2019: U.S. Navy Acquisition

This post is part of a series of review stories looking back at the top naval news from 2019.

2019 started with a surprise in the Navy budget request: the service needed to buy and test unmanned surface vehicles immediately to reach its ultimate goals for the surface force, and it was willing to sacrifice almost anything – including sidelining an aircraft carrier – to free up the funds to do so. Read More

HII: Block V Virginia SSN Contract Balances Budget Realities With Operational Needs

HII: Block V Virginia SSN Contract Balances Budget Realities With Operational Needs

Rendering of Block V Virginia-class submarine with Virginia Payload Module. General Dynamics Electric Boat Image

Negotiations to build the Block V Virginia-class submarines will likely result in a contract for fewer subs than what Congress authorized, than the Navy wants and than industry can build, a shipbuilding executive told Wall Street analysts on Thursday. Read More

GAO Says Columbia Submarine Risks Running Over Budget Due to Immature Technology

GAO Says Columbia Submarine Risks Running Over Budget Due to Immature Technology

An undated artist’s rendering of the planned Columbia-class submarine. Naval Sea Systems Command Image

The Columbia-class ballistic missile submarine, the Navy’s top acquisition priority, is at risk of running over its $115-billion construction budget because the service underestimated labor costs and overestimated the savings associated with awarding a multi-year contract, according to a General Accountability Office report released Monday. Read More