Tag Archives: Gen. David Berger

Marines Stop Shipping New Recruits to Parris Island to Limit COVID-19 Spread

Marines Stop Shipping New Recruits to Parris Island to Limit COVID-19 Spread

U.S. Marine Corps Recruits with Papa Company, 4th Recruit Training Battalion, and Bravo Company, 1st Recruit Training Battalion, conduct their initial swim qualification at the combat training pool on Marine Corps Recruit Depot, Parris Island, S.C. on June 4, 2019. US Marine Corps Photo

This post has been updated to include a comment from Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego.

The Marine Corps will temporarily suspend shipping new recruits to Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island in South Carolina, after a handful of cases of the COVID-19 virus have been diagnosed at the installation. Read More

Marine Corps Training Continues - With Some Modifications - to Keep High Readiness Despite Pandemic

Marine Corps Training Continues – With Some Modifications – to Keep High Readiness Despite Pandemic

U.S. Marines with 1st Marine Battalion, 1st Marine Regiment, participate in urban operations training during exercise Native Fury 20 in the United Arab Emirates on March 22, 2020. US Marine Corps Photo

THE PENTAGON – The Marine Corps is dedicated to remaining a “fight tonight” force for the United States despite the coronavirus pandemic and will continue training to mission-essential tasks as determined by local commanders, the commandant said today. Read More

Document: Marine Corps Force Design 2030

Document: Marine Corps Force Design 2030

BOTTOM LINE UP FRONT

This report describes the progress of the Marine Corps on my watch in preparing for the sweeping changes needed to meet the principal challenges facing the institution: effectively playing our role as the nation’s naval expeditionary force-in-readiness, while simultaneously modernizing the force in accordance with the National Defense Strategy (NDS) – and doing both within the fiscal resources we are provided. A certain degree of institutional change is inevitable when confronting modernization on this scale, and that type of change is hard. As such, I want to be clear up front: our force design effort is a work in progress. Thanks to the dedication and effort of a great many Marines, Sailors, and civilians over the last six months, we have come to a clearer understanding of some force design changes we can confidently make today, while identifying other areas that require additional analysis. This reports explains, at length and in some detail, my argument for change, our force design methodology and organization, my personal assessment of the work to date, and the steps we are taking to move the force design effort into the next phase. Read More

New Marine Corps Cuts Will Slash All Tanks, Many Heavy Weapons As Focus Shifts to Lighter, Littoral Forces

New Marine Corps Cuts Will Slash All Tanks, Many Heavy Weapons As Focus Shifts to Lighter, Littoral Forces

An M1 Abrams Tank with mine plow attachment conducts fire and maneuver training operations with 2d Tank Battalion, 2d Marine Division at Fort Stewart, Ga., in 2018. US Marine Corps Photo

The Marine Corps will soon lay out its path to achieve a 2030 force optimized for conflict with China in the littorals – a force that will completely divest of its tanks and slash most of its artillery cannon battalions, instead focusing on developing light mobility options to get around island chains with the assistance of unmanned systems and mobile anti-ship missiles. Read More

Marines Ditch MUX Ship-Based Drone to Pursue Large Land-Based UAS, Smaller Shipboard Vehicle

Marines Ditch MUX Ship-Based Drone to Pursue Large Land-Based UAS, Smaller Shipboard Vehicle

The Office of Naval Research and DARPA are collaborating on the Tern project to give forward-deployed small ships the ability to serve as mobile launch and recovery sites for medium-altitude, long-endurance unmanned aerial systems that would provide ISR and other capabilities. DARPA rendering.

The Marines have ditched their plan to field a very large drone on amphibious ships, instead breaking the four-year-old MUX program into a family of systems that will include a very large land-based unmanned aerial vehicle and a medium-sized one for shipboard operations. Read More

CNO, Commandant Asking for Fleet Wholeness Amid Pause in Future Force Structure Planning

CNO, Commandant Asking for Fleet Wholeness Amid Pause in Future Force Structure Planning

USS America (LHA-6) sails in the Gulf of Thailand in support of Exercise Cobra Gold 2020 on March 1, 2020. US Navy Photo

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – The Navy and Marine Corps are caught in a battle with Pentagon leadership over the right force size to aim for and how quickly to try to get there, but the top officers in the sea services insist that everyone is on the same page about maintaining wholeness and readiness as the service grows. Read More

Huntington Ingalls Industries Planning for Increased U.S. Navy Demand for UUVs

Huntington Ingalls Industries Planning for Increased U.S. Navy Demand for UUVs

U.S. Navy Chief Aerographer’s Mate Travis Lawson and U.S. Navy Mineman 2nd Class Mathew Williams, both assigned to the Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit (EODMU) 5 Unmanned Systems (UMS) Platoon 141, lower an Mark 18 MOD 1 Swordfish unmanned underwater vehicle (UUV) into the water as members of the Indonesian Navy’s Komando Pasukan Katak (KOPASKA) 2nd Fleet Surabaya Unit observe during a UUV familiarization drill as part of a mine countermeasures knowledge exchange for Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training (CARAT) Indonesia 2019. US Navy photo.

Huntington Ingalls Industries is restructuring its shipbuilding businesses to tap into the Navy’s growing demand for unmanned undersea vehicles. Read More

Marines Will Soon Reveal Plans to Divest Old Systems, Invest in New Tech to Fight China

Marines Will Soon Reveal Plans to Divest Old Systems, Invest in New Tech to Fight China

U.S. Marines drive a Joint Light Tactical Vehicles through the water at White Beach as part of the I Marine Expeditionary Force JLTV Operator New Equipment Training course on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, Calif., on Oct. 24, 2019. US Marine Photo

CAPITOL HILL — The Marine Corps is on a course to overhaul its force design in just a matter of years to better position itself to deter and, if needed, defeat China in the Pacific, the commandant said today. The outcomes of two future force reviews should be publicly released within the next month, he said, though they’re currently waiting for final approval from the Office of the Secretary of Defense. Read More