Category Archives: Documents

Document: CRS on the Security Clearances Process

Document: CRS on the Security Clearances Process

From the Sept. 9, 2013 Congressional Research Service Report: Security Clearance Process: Answers to Frequently Asked Questions.

A security clearance is a determination that an individual—whether a direct federal employee or a private contractor performing work for the government—is eligible for access to classified national security information. A security clearance alone does not grant an individual access to classified materials. Rather, a security clearance means that an individual is eligible for access. In order to gain access to specific classified materials, an individual should also have a demonstrated “need to know” the information contained in the specific classified materials. Read More

Document: CBO Analysis of U.S. Navy 2014 Shipbuilding Plan

Document: CBO Analysis of U.S. Navy 2014 Shipbuilding Plan

From the Congressional Budget Office September, 2013 Analysis of the U.S. Navy’s Fiscal Year 2014 Shipbuilding Plan:
The 2013 and 2014 shipbuilding plans are very similar, but not identical, with respect to the Navy’s total inventory goal (in military parlance, its requirement) for battle force ships, the number and types of ships the Navy would purchase over 30 years, and the proposed funding to implement the plans. Read More

Document: Congressional Research Service Virginia-class Submarine Report

Document: Congressional Research Service Virginia-class Submarine Report

From the Congressional Research Service Sept. 27, 2013 Virginia (SSN-774) Class Attack Submarine Procurement report: The Navy is proposing to defer to FY2015 the remaining $952.7 million of the procurement cost of the second boat requested for FY2014. This would divide the procurement funding for the boat between two fiscal years (FY2014 and FY2015)—a funding profile sometimes called split funding. Read More

Document: Congressional Research Service Navy Littoral Combat Ship Program Report

Document: Congressional Research Service Navy Littoral Combat Ship Program Report

From the Congressional Research Service Sept. 27, 2013 Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) report:The LCS program has become controversial due to past cost growth, design and construction issues with the lead ships built to each design, concerns over the ships’ ability to withstand battle damage, and concerns over whether the ships are sufficiently armed and would be able to perform their stated missions effectively. Some observers, citing one or more of these issues, have proposed truncating the LCS program to either 24 ships (i.e., stopping procurement after procuring all the ships covered under the two block buy contracts) or to some other number well short of 52. Other observers have proposed down selecting to a single LCS design (i.e., continuing production of only one of the two designs) after the 24th ship. Read More

Document: USMC Commandant's Plan to 'Reawaken' the Marine Corps

Document: USMC Commandant’s Plan to ‘Reawaken’ the Marine Corps

General James Amos, commandant of the Marine Corps, speaks with non-commissioned officers on Sept. 17, 2013. USMC Photo

General James Amos, commandant of the Marine Corps, speaks with non-commissioned officers on Sept. 17, 2013. USMC Photo

The following are slides from U.S. Marine Corps Commandant James Amos Sept. 23, 2013 General Officer Symposium briefing on the direction of the service after the withdrawal of forces from Afghanistan.
“We will stop accepting bad behavior or substandard performance as a natural consequence of being a ‘combat hardened’ Marine Corps,” Amos said.
“We will begin enforcing established standards. This will include behavior, physical conditioning, personal appearance, weight and body fat.”
The so-called “reawakening” includes placing restrictions on off-base housing, increases emphasis on security in barracks and tightens rules for Marines in garrison. Read More

Shutdown: Adm. Gortney's Message to Fleet

Shutdown: Adm. Gortney’s Message to Fleet

From the Oct. 4 message from Fleet Forces commander Adm. Bill Gortney to the fleet.

During the current government shutdown, the Fleet will continue to provide ready forces to safeguard national security. In the meantime, we must remember that war fighting is first, and we will continue to provide the best possible support to those engaged in that fight. Concurrently, we will continue to protect the lives and property of our Nation’s citizens. We have historically demonstrated good judgment and scrutiny of our operations and expenditures, and I expect even greater scrutiny in the current environment. Read More

Document: GAO UCLASS Acquisition Needs More Oversight

Document: GAO UCLASS Acquisition Needs More Oversight

From the Sept. 26 Government Accountability Office report: Navy Strategy for Unmanned Carrier Based Aircraft System Defers Key Oversight Mechanisms.

UCLASS faces several programmatic risks going forward. First, the UCLASS cost estimate of $3.7 billion exceeds the level of funding that the Navy expects to budget for the system through fiscal year 2020. Second, the Navy has scheduled 8 months between the time it issues its request for air vehicle design proposals and the time it awards the air vehicle contract, a process that DOD officials note typically takes 12 months to complete. Read More