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How Elvis Helped Save the USS Arizona Memorial

How Elvis Helped Save the USS Arizona Memorial

USS Arizona underway.

USS Arizona underway.

The Imperial Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941 inflicted a brutal blow on the U.S. Pacific fleet but only two active ships were a total loss – U.S.S. Oklahoma and U.S.S. Arizona. Oklahoma was eventually refloated but was too badly damaged to repair and return to service. Arizona, however, had been devastated by a cataclysmic explosion caused by a bomb crashing through the deck and igniting the ship’s forward magazine. Nearly 80 percent of Arizona’s 1,512 crewmen were lost with most of them being entombed in the sunken ship. Read More

Opinion Roundup: After the Ratings

Opinion Roundup: After the Ratings

In late September, the Navy announced a major overhaul in how it classifies and addresses its enlisted sailors. As part of the restructure, the Navy eliminated the centuries old ratings system for sailors. The move replaced titles like Machinist’s Mate First Class and Boatswain’s Mate Second Class with an occupational specialty code and the generic address of Petty Officer.

The following is a selection of opinion pieces from the November issue of Proceedings and other outlets that discuss the service’s decision. Read More

USNI News Interview: Mel Gibson, Vince Vaughn Talk New Battle of Okinawa Movie 'Hacksaw Ridge'

USNI News Interview: Mel Gibson, Vince Vaughn Talk New Battle of Okinawa Movie ‘Hacksaw Ridge’

Andrew Garfield as Medal of Honor recipient Desmond Doss in the new film Hacksaw Ridge. Lionsgate Photo

Andrew Garfield as Medal of Honor recipient Desmond Doss in the new film Hacksaw Ridge. Lionsgate Photo

CORRECTION: A previous version of this post incorrectly stated the number of U.S. service members who were awarded the Medal of Honor for actions during the Battle of Okinawa. Twenty-four service members were awarded the Medal of Honor following the battle — 13 posthumously.

The Battle of Okinawa has been referred to as a “meat grinder” because of the carnage that took place during the three months of savage fighting between Japanese and U.S. led allied forces in 1945. Read More

Destroyer Zumwalt's Commissioning Ceremony Latest in Long Tradition

Destroyer Zumwalt’s Commissioning Ceremony Latest in Long Tradition

Capt. James A. Kirk, commanding officer of future USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) answers questions from the media ahead of the ship's commissioning on Saturday. US Navy Photo

Capt. James A. Kirk, commanding officer of future USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) answers questions from the media ahead of the ship’s commissioning on Saturday. US Navy Photo

On Saturday, the guided missile destroyer Zumwalt (DDG-1000) will formally enter the U.S. Navy fleet in Baltimore in an act of pageantry that goes back thousands of years – the commissioning ceremony. Read More

10 Years After Hurricane Katrina: The Sea Service Response

10 Years After Hurricane Katrina: The Sea Service Response

Satellite image provided by the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Monterey, Calif., showing the status of Hurricane Katrina, at 1015Z or just after 5am EST on Aug. 25, 2015. US Navy Photo

Satellite image provided by the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Monterey, Calif., showing the status of Hurricane Katrina, at 1015Z or just after 5am EST on Aug. 29, 2005. US Navy Photo

The following is from the October 2005 issue of Proceedings outlining the early U.S. Coast Guard, Navy and Marine Corps response to the Gulf Coast following landfall of Hurricane Katrina with the original title of, Katrina: What’s Going Right? Read More

The Naval History and HNSA Guide to U.S. Museum Ships

The Naval History and HNSA Guide to U.S. Museum Ships

Navies are tough on their ships.

From commissioning to when they leave the service, naval vessels are driven hard, fulfilling myriad missions and carrying their sailors and marines the world over.

More often than not at the end of their service these ships are sold to allies, scrapped or sometimes sunk to create coral reefs or for target practice.

However, there are some that are preserved as places for the public to get a sense for what life was like for warships and their crews on the high seas. Read More