John Grady

About John Grady

John Grady, a former managing editor of Navy Times, retired as director of communications for the Association of the United States Army. His reporting on national defense and national security has appeared on Breaking Defense, GovExec.com, NextGov.com, DefenseOne.com, Government Executive and USNI News.


Recent Posts By the Author


SOUTHCOM CO: China’s Influence Growing in Western Hemisphere  

SOUTHCOM CO: China’s Influence Growing in Western Hemisphere  

Adm. Craig Faller, the commander of U.S. Southern Command, arrives to Soto Cano Air Base, Honduras on June 20, 2019. US Marine Corps Photo

China’s soft power moves in the Western Hemisphere – from building ports to sharing information on space and offering wireless 5G technologies – “have hard aims” with military implications that are drawing increased attention in Washington, the admiral in charge of U.S. Southern Command told a Senate panel on Tuesday. Read More

Navy Needs To Think Small When Planning Irregular Surface Warfare Strategies

Navy Needs To Think Small When Planning Irregular Surface Warfare Strategies

A boarding team from dock landing ship USS Whidbey Island (LSD 41) approaches merchant vessel Golden Nori after pirates released the Japanese chemical tanker Dec. 12, 2007. The pirates seized the ship off the coast of Somalia in late October. The release of Golden Nori marked the first time in more than a year that no ships were held by Somali pirates. Navy Photo

Great power competition dramatically expands the challenges of confronting irregular naval warfare such as defending against maritime pirates or preserving the security of data sent through undersea cables, a panel of experts said at the Hudson Institute last week.

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Lawmaker Cites Vacant Pentagon Jobs As Obstacle to Technology Development

Lawmaker Cites Vacant Pentagon Jobs As Obstacle to Technology Development

Sailors train with the LA9-P Laser Hail and Warning System on the fantail of aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75).

When confronting threats from space, directed energy and hypersonic weapons, the U.S. is working toward the technology it needs; what’s slowing progress is the lack of confirmed people to fill key Pentagon positions to guide these programs, warned the chairman of the House Armed Services strategic forces subcommittee. Read More

Jones Act Not The Cause Of Higher Shipping Costs Supporters Say

Jones Act Not The Cause Of Higher Shipping Costs Supporters Say

A crew member of the Coast Guard Cutter Mackinaw keeps a lookout before the ship’s departure for icebreaking operations on Whitefish Bay and Lake Superior ahead of the opening of the Sault Ste. Marie Locks March 25th, the start of this year’s shipping season. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

The Maritime Administration’s top official challenged critics of the Jones Act to prove the law’s requirement for having American-made ships with American crews is the “source of all evil” causing prices to increase for goods, minerals and food shipped by sea or inland waterways.

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Panel Says U.S. Military Recruitment Pool Must Broaden

Panel Says U.S. Military Recruitment Pool Must Broaden

Recruits receive instruction from Boatswain’s Mate 2nd Class Darren Marks in the USS Marlinespike trainer at Recruit Training Command (RTC) on Oct. 24, 2018. US Navy Photo

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Recruiting young men and women from military families has succeeded in attracting applicants, however doing so questions the services’ long-term ability to attract people from other backgrounds with new talents needed for the future, a panel of personnel experts said Friday. Read More

Experts Say Arms Sale to Taiwan Answer Defense Needs, But Spur New Questions

Experts Say Arms Sale to Taiwan Answer Defense Needs, But Spur New Questions

Satellite image of the Taiwan Strait, separated mainland China on the left, from the island of Taiwan on the right. NASA photo

A pending sale of F-16 fighters, Abrams tanks, anti-armor and anti-aircraft missiles, to Taiwan drew rebukes from Beijing but also set off alarms on the island about its ability retain talent and develop home-made defenses, one of its leading security experts said Wednesday.

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