Home » Budget Industry » Bath Iron Works Awarded Second Flight III Destroyer In Two Ship Contract Modification


Bath Iron Works Awarded Second Flight III Destroyer In Two Ship Contract Modification

An artist’s conception of the AMDR AN/SPY-6(v) radar onboard an Arleigh Burke Flight III guided missile destroyer (DDG-51). Raytheon Image

General Dynamics Bath Iron Works was awarded a two destroyer deal that would include the construction of the second planned Flight III Arleigh Burke guided-missile destroyer (DDG-51) for the Navy, according to a Thursday Pentagon contract announcement.

The contract will include the Flight III configuration with the Raytheon-built SPY-6 air and missile defense radar on the unnamed DDG-126 and DDG-127 will be built in a Flight IIA configuration.

“DDG-126 was awarded under the contract that was part of a multi-year competition for DDG 51-class destroyers in 2013. DDG-127 was approved by Congress under separate legislation,” read a statement from General Dynamics.
The Navy did not release the costs of the contract modification.

“As the Navy expects to release a competitive solicitation for additional DDG 51 class ships in the Flight III configuration in future years, the contract award amount is considered source selection sensitive information,” read the announcement.

Senators Susan Collins (R-Maine), Angus King (I-Maine) and Rep. Chellie Pingree (D-Maine) praised the award in a combined statement on Thursday.

“These contracts to construct two new DDG-51 class destroyers in Bath demonstrates the Navy’s commitment to BIW and its confidence in the highly skilled, hard-working employees at the shipyard,” the trio said.

However, King and Collins have expressed concern over maturity of the Flight III design in the last several months.

In addition to the SPY-6, the changes to the design will increase the power available on the ship by three Rolls Royce 3-megawatt generators on the Flight IIA ships with Rolls Royce’s 4-megawatt generator in the same footprint on the ship.

The electrical grid on the ship will also be upgraded from the 450-volt configuration to a 4,160-volt grid that will lead to additional design changes.

In June, Huntington Ingalls Industries was awarded the first Flight III hull after more than a year of negotiation with the service.

The following is the complete contract Sept. 28, 2017 award announcement.

 

General Dynamics Bath Iron Works, Bath, Maine, is being awarded a fixed-price-incentive-firm target modification to a previously awarded contract (N00024-13-C-2305) for incorporation of the Flight III baseline on DDG 126 and award of one fiscal 2016 ship (DDG 127) in the Flight IIA configuration. Flight III will incorporate the SPY-6 Air and Missile Defense Radar (AMDR) and upgrade the electrical power and cooling capacity plus additional associated changes. The fiscal 2016 ship was appropriated by Congress in the 2016 Consolidated Appropriations Act (P.L. 114-113). As the Navy expects to release a competitive solicitation for additional DDG 51 class ships in the Flight III configuration in future years, the contract award amount is considered source selection sensitive information (see 41 U.S. Code 2101, et seq., Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) 2.101 and FAR 3.104) and will not be made public at this time. Work for DDG 126 and 127 will be performed in Bath, Maine (62 percent); Walpole, Massachusetts (5 percent); Cincinnati, Ohio (5 percent); Coatesville, Pennsylvania (2 percent); York, Pennsylvania (2 percent); South Portland, Maine (1 percent); Falls Church, Virginia (1 percent); and other locations below 1 percent (collectively totaling 22 percent), and is scheduled to complete in fiscal 2024. Fiscal 2016 shipbuilding and conversion (Navy); and fiscal 2017 shipbuilding and conversion (Navy) funding will be obligated at time of award and will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, District of Columbia, is the contracting activity.

 

  • Bailey Zhang

    I am so surprised that DDG 127 is Flight IIA, wondering what DDG 128 will be.

    • Patrick Bechet

      I expect another contract modification making DDG-127 a Flight III.

      • @USS_Fallujah

        I don’t think that’s likely, and perhaps is impossible. There are so many modifications I suspect it will be the next year’s ships that go to all Flight III (at both shipyards specification.

        • DaSaint

          It doesn’t make sense that DDG 126 is Flight III, while the subsequent DDG 127 is Flight IIA. Either should have been the other way around or we should expect 127’s contract to be likewise modified to Flight III.

          Also shows continued difficulty of BIW keeping up with contract and shipyard flexibility of Ingalls. This should hold them over for a while, but doesnt solve their long term problems.

      • Bailey Zhang

        They have that chance to award that contract since DD127 starts construction in 2019

    • SteveFinSC

      See my comment above.

  • RTColorado

    I hope it has auto-pilot and is driverless.

    • Ed L

      Find some retired LDO’s and chiefs to stand bridge watches

      • RTColorado

        That would do it.

  • Ed L

    No aft 5 inch. Sad

  • Curtis Conway

    Still trying to figure this out. Either its a Flt III or not. “The contract will include the Flight III configuration with the Raytheon-built SPY-6 air and missile defense radar on the unnamed DDG-126 and DDG-127 will be built in a Flight IIA configuration.”

    • Bailey Zhang

      DDG126 is III, 127 is IIA

      • Curtis Conway

        Looking forward to seeing BIW’s ECP approach for Flt III.

    • SteveFinSC

      Per a footnote on Wikipedia: “ADDG-127 contract was awarded separately at a later date. Though ships preceding her, (125 & 126) had begun the Flight III series, 127 was designated
      as a Flight IIA Technology Insertion build. The Navy expects future Arleigh Burke-class builds (starting at DDG-128) to be Flight III series.”

      • Curtis Conway

        yeah . . . when you watch the good Captain give his briefing, he explains this in detail. I just figured it out. That DDG-127 will be some kind of Flt IIA. Nice ship.

  • Kenneth Millstein

    The Bath Iron Works really knows how to build a Destroyer. I was a QM on board one of the ships they built back in 1954. It was the USS Mullinnix DD 944, a Forest Sherman class all gun destroyer. It was built with great care and strength except for the all aluminum super structure which was sadly not such a great idea. Anyway, may she rest in peace below the Atlantic.

  • cromicacid

    Navy needs a dedicated Anti-ship-missile. The harpoon is outdated and too slow. The SM6, though fast, lacks a potent warhead needed for a mission kill. I understand that the current Naval doctrine is to rely on Carrier jets for anti-surface warfare but what will the navy do if their carriers sink or are damaged beyond repair? The flight III forgoes the harpoon launchers and drops the phalanx…..so the burkes are nothing more than floating SAMs?

    • Ed L

      The US Navy could buy a hundred Tawian build one third generation of Taiwanese technology in the Hsiung Feng series of anti-ship missiles which have been developed by the National Chung-Shan Institute of Science and Technology (CSIST) in Taiwan. Currently deployed on Cheng Kung-class frigates are guided-missile frigates (PFG) currently in service of the Republic of China (Taiwan) Navy (ROCN). They are based upon the U.S. Oliver Hazard Perry class and built by China Shipbuilding Corporation in Kaohsiung. Then get the license to build them ourselves.

  • Ed L

    The US Navy could buy a 2 or 300 of Tawian’s third generation of Hsiung Feng series of anti-ship missiles which have been developed by the National Chung-Shan Institute of Science and Technology (CSIST) in Taiwan. Currently deployed on Cheng Kung-class frigates (U.S. Oliver Hazard Perry class design) built by China Shipbuilding Corporation in Kaohsiung. Then America could get the license to build them ourselves. The missile travels at supersonic speeds (Mach 2.5-Mach 3.0) The missile is believed to have an possible maximum range of 300 km and a minimum range of 30 km. It can be deployed on ships and mobile trailers.

  • Centaurus

    Let’s bring back the Iowa-Class BB. Stick it in Kim’s porthole

  • Centaurus

    Does anyone know what happens when Aluminum burns ? Look at what happened to the HMS Sheffield in the Falklands. A couple of Exocets hit it and it burned like a Magnesium flare !
    Now what will happen to our Aluminum hulls as on the LCS or an Arleih -Burke ?

    • gelceea

      The Arleigh Burke is steel.

      • Centaurus

        Serious person, I was thinking of LCS. Is your brain of steel ?