Home » Budget Industry » Coast Guard Celebrates Birthday by Naming 11 Planned Offshore Patrol Cutters


Coast Guard Celebrates Birthday by Naming 11 Planned Offshore Patrol Cutters

An artist’s conception of Eastern Shipbuilding’s Offshore Patrol Cutter design.

The Coast Guard is celebrating its birthday by naming its new class of Offshore Patrol Cutters after a mix of the earliest and most famous vessels in the service, according to a Friday morning ALCOAST message.

Four of the first 11 cutters will bear the names used for the earliest vessels in the Revenue Cutter Service — Active, Argus, Diligence and
Vigilant, read the message.

Additionally, “OPC Pickering will pay homage to the distinguished combat record of the Quasi-War cutter Pickering. OPCs Chase and Ingham will carry the names of [cutters] that served with distinction in World War II, read the message. OPC Rush will bear the name of the Bering Sea cutter that helped open the Alaskan frontier for generations of American settlers,” read the message.
“OPC Icarus will be named for a cutter that sank one of the first U-boats after U.S. entry into World War II and captured her crew. OPCs Alert and Reliance bear the names of famed workhorses of the medium-endurance cutter fleet.”

Active One of the ‘First Ten’ U.S. Revenue Cutters. Active entered service in 1791
Argus One of the ‘First Ten’ U.S. Revenue Cutters. Argus entered service in 1791
Diligence One of the ‘First Ten’ U.S. Revenue Cutters. Diligence entered service in 1792
Vigilant One of the ‘First Ten’ U.S. Revenue Cutters. Vigilant entered service in 1791
Pickering In 1799 the cutter bested a more heavily armed French privateer after a nine-hour gun battle during the Quasi-War.
Chase USRC Salmon P. Chase, named after Lincoln’s Treasury Secretary was commissioned in 1878 as a training vessel and ended its career as a detention barge.
Ingham The Treasury-class cutter served as a convoy escort in World War II, sinking a German U-Boat in 1942.
Rush The Dexter-class Revenue Cutter was commissioned in 1874 and made several cruises off the Alaskan territory.
Icarus The Thetis-class patrol boat sank a German U-Boat and captured its crew off of North Carolina in 1942.
Alert Alert is an active a Reliance-class cutter that was named for an early cutter in the Revenue Cutter Service.
Reliance Reliance is an active a Reliance-class cutter named for an early cutter in the Revenue Cutter Service.

The Offshore Patrol Cutter program was awarded to Florida shipbuilder Eastern Shipbuilding as part of a $110.3 million initial contract in September. The program for the 25 cutters could be worth up to $2.38 billion.

“The offshore patrol cutter will be the backbone of Coast Guard offshore presence and the manifestation of our at-sea authorities,” said Adm. Paul Zukunft, commandant of the Coast Guard in a statement. “It is essential to stopping smugglers at sea, for interdicting undocumented migrants, rescuing mariners, enforcing fisheries laws, responding to disasters and protecting our ports.”

The first OPC is expected to deliver in 2021

  • Ed L

    Great Names for Great Coast Guard Cutters.

  • Lyle Fulton

    All are very worthy names w
    ith great historical significance to the U.S.
    Coast Guard. I can’t help but be a little disappointed that Tamaroa missed the list. The Cutter Tamaroa had an active start with the U.S. Navy. During WWII the Zuni as she was first named, worked in the Pacific and towed many torpedo damaged ships back to port for repairs. After the war she was reallocated to the Coast Guard and had decades of distinguished service as the Cutter Tamaroa. Most memorable is the work she did during Storm of the Century off the New England coast in October of 1991. She and her crew made several death defying rescues, most notably they were on scene to search for and rescue four Air National Guard crew members whose helicopter crashed into the sea. The rescues were the subject of the Sebastian Junger novel “A Perfect Storm” and later a motion picture by the same name. There is no doubt that because of the Tamaroa and her crew, there are people who walk the Earth today that would have been lost at sea for an eternity that night. The Tamaroa, was decommissioned and sunk earlier this year to become an artificial reef. Her name should, by all rights, live on in the future of the Coast Guard. “Tamaroa”should be welded into the steel hull of one of our newest Cutters, to proudly sail and serve again.

    • DaSaint

      14 cutters to go….the possibility still exists.

  • Uncle Mike

    Great names to carry on a great tradition. I hope the new SECNAV is taking notes.

    • Rob C.

      I totally agree, I wish they take clues from the Coast Guard and name their future Frigates after ships like that. Having sizable part of the fleet named after people and places isn’t as invoking to me as the ones from the service’s beginning.

  • DaSaint

    Happy Birthday and well done USCG. And well done for Eastern Shipbuilding, getting through the first phase of this project, on time, and within budget. Wow! Within budget! When was the last time that happened?

  • LowObservable

    Good looking cutter, the USN should consider it as a template for a Frigate.

    • Ed L

      More of a Corvette than a Frigate Offshore Patrol cutter is the successor to the 270′ Famous class and the 210′ Reliance class Medium Endurance Cutter
      OPC Characteristics:
      Number Planned: 25
      Length: 360 feet
      Beam: 54 feet
      Draft: 17 feet
      Sustained Speed: 22.5 knots
      Range: 10,200 nautical miles at 14 knots
      Endurance: 60-days

      National Security Cutter (9)
      Displacement: 4,500 long tons (4,600 t)
      Length: 418 feet (127 m)
      Beam: 54 feet (16 m)
      Draft: 22.5 feet (6.9 m)
      Max Speed: 28 knots

      • Murray

        The OPC looks very much like a scaled up version of the Royal New Zealand Navy’s Otago class offshore patrol vessels (OPVs)

  • Scott

    Glad to see Ingham made the list. I played baseball as a kid with one of her commanding officer’s sons. The old Ingham and the Eagle did a port visit in Alexandria VA and he gave my Dad and I a great tour of the ship. Good times.

  • A. C. MacDonald

    I served on the Hamilton Class, USCGC CHASE (WHEC-718), I think I can speak for all previous crew members of the USCGC Chase, we are delighted and proud the USCG has decided to carry on with the name Chase. Our ship served with distinction, and we are proud crew members. “NO CHALLENGE TOO GREAT” was our motto and we all hope this carries on

  • A. C. MacDonald

    I served on the Hamilton Class, USCGC CHASE (WHEC-718), I think I can speak for all previous crew members of the USCGC Chase, we are delighted and proud the USCG has decided to carry on with the name Chase. Our ship served with distinction, and we are proud crew members. “NO CHALLENGE TOO GREAT” was our motto and we all hope this carries on. USCGC Chase served in Viet Nam, and continued service homeported out of Boston when I serviced, then moved to the west coast. The Chase Association is so happy this has come true…..

  • Joy

    My dad was in WWII in the Coast Guard & was one of the about 75 Coast Guard men that captured Germans in Greenland…I believe in Oct. 1944. He passed 15 yrs. ago, & my 1 older brother, the only family that I had left, passed 2 months ago. Because I couldn’t remember what my Dad told me when he was still alive, my brother was just telling me about our Dads involvement in that capture 3 days before he passed. We had such a nice talk that day, it seemed like he was trying to tell me as much as he could remember about our Dads time in WWII…little did I know he’d be gone in 3 short days as well. So now, I’m online trying to find any amount of info about it, to piece things together with what I remember my brother told me. I’m the last one left in our family, if anyone has some knowledgable input, I would really appreciate it so I can share this story with my sons & nephews. I belueve their ship was called Northland? Is that correct?