Home » Budget Industry » Navy Identifies Lost USS Normandy Sailor as Christopher W. Clavin; Search Continues off North Carolina


Navy Identifies Lost USS Normandy Sailor as Christopher W. Clavin; Search Continues off North Carolina

FC 2nd Class Christopher W. Clavin. Photo via US Fleet Forces

The Navy has identified the sailor who fell overboard from the USS Normandy (CG-60) on Tuesday as Fire Controlman 2nd Class Christopher W. Clavin, according to a Thursday statement from U.S. Fleet Forces Command.

The identification comes as Navy and Coast Guard assets continue to search for the missing sailor who went overboard about 80 miles off of the North Carolina coast in Tuesday afternoon, according to the statement.

“Every Navy and Coast Guard member participating in this operation is dedicated to finding our lost shipmate. Our thoughts are with Petty Officer Clavin and his family during this difficult time,” said Adm. Phil Davidson, commander, U.S. Fleet Forces in a statement.

Along with Normandy, carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72), U.S. Coast Guard medium endurance cutter USCGC Forward (WMEC-911), destroyers USS Bainbridge (DDG-96), USS The Sullivans (DDG-68) and USS Mason (DDG-87) are searching for the missing sailor.

“As of today, the Navy and Coast Guard team have spent 48 hours in a systematic and comprehensive search that has covered roughly 2,500 square miles,” Fleet Forces said.
According to Fleet Forces, Clavin was seen by personnel on the cruiser fall into the water, “resulting in an immediate man overboard call and a massive search and rescue effort.”

Clavin, originally from Rhode Island, enlisted in the service in July of 2012 and had been stationed on Normandy since November of 2013.

USS Normandy (CG-60) and the guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG-99) on Sept. 23, 2014. US Navy Photo

The following is the complete June 8, 2017 statement from U.S. Fleet Forces.

Search Continues for USS Normandy Sailor

NORFOLK, Va. – Navy and Coast Guard assets are continuing their search for Fire Controlman 2nd Class Christopher W. Clavin who went overboard from the guided-missile cruiser USS Normandy (CG 60) June 6 at about 3 p.m. while the ship was underway conducting training near Cherry Point, North Carolina.

Personnel observed Petty Officer Clavin fall into the water 80 miles off the coast Tuesday, resulting in an immediate man overboard call and a massive search and rescue effort involving aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72), with four embarked helicopters, U.S. Coast Guard medium endurance cutter USCGC Forward (WMEC 911), as well as guided missile destroyers USS Bainbridge (DDG 96), USS The Sullivans (DDG 68) and USS Mason (DDG 87). Additional Navy and Coast Guard aircraft have also been assisting in the search.

“Every Navy and Coast Guard member participating in this operation is dedicated to finding our lost shipmate. Our thoughts are with Petty Officer Clavin and his family during this difficult time,” said Adm. Phil Davidson, commander, U.S. Fleet Forces.

As of today, the Navy and Coast Guard team have spent 48 hours in a systematic and comprehensive search that has covered roughly 2,500 square miles.

Search efforts are continuing and updates will be provided when available.

 

 

 

  • Garrett ‘Ed’ Bates

    As an OS2 who spent 4 years on the USS Shasta AE-33 I know man over board procedures, however I was also a ships swimmer, as far as I am concerned, what is a person doing aboard a sea going vessel who does not know how to swim or for that matter not know how to sustain ones self if fallen over board. These should be basic skills for all in the US Navy.

    • Gary Johnson

      A 30 foot drop at 30 knots can have enough impact to knock a man out cold. That class of CG only has a 55′ beam and they roll heavily in turns. It is the ocean, anything can happen.

  • Curtis Conway

    I served in a Navy where we saved Oscar at some unannounced hour during every underway period. It reinforced MOB procedures and discipline to the entire crew. Our commanding officer and wardroom accepted nothing less.

    • Robert W. Anderson

      Who’s Oscar.

      • Curtis Conway

        Oscar is the Man Overboard Dummy!

        I gave you a longer and more complete answer, but because there are those in the world who cannot live in the real world, face reality, or otherwise remain fully functional when faced with reality, the comment has been held. However, If anyone in the Wardroom does not know who Oscar is, then their underway qualifications are questionable, and they do not belong at sea.

    • mariner138

      Was OOD on a CVS between Yankee Station and Subic when a seaman was observed to deliberately jump off the hangar deck with the immortal parting words, “I can’t take this s#$t no more”. Immediate MOD, picked up Pritac and informed lifeguard DD trailing astern that swimmer in the drink was a head case; lots of black smoke and white water from the can…it had the guy aboard in 8 minutes flat and safely stowed below!

  • John B. Morgen

    More ships and aircraft are going to be needed because the ocean currents have taken Christopher W. Clavin away from the area. Expend the search for a wider area….

  • Laura Morgan Walters

    Prayers to our fellow sailor and his family! We love you and we are here for you!!!

  • Ed L

    Sad, so sad, But I have questions to ask. Did he fall cleanly into the ocean? Or did he hit any part of the ship on the way down. I had a BM-3 fall into the Atlantic from a height of almost 50 feet. But he did not hit anything on the way down and was lucky not to be render unconscious when he hit the water. Seas were about 12 to 20. big swells too. Thank You Helo from the Carrier.

  • John Doran

    CG60 was my home for over three years, it would be a sad day on the ‘Vanguard of Victory’ if doesn’t make it back to the boat. Thoughts and prayers to this shipmate and family.

  • Matt

    For as much money as is being spent on the search… why not buy these sailors some life jackets that pop open when they hit the water (they have CO2 canisters) and have a GPS locator. I take these things on my little boat, surely if we can afford a multi-billion dollar ship we can afford some basic gear for people who need and deserve it.

    • Penny Diane Stevenson

      Yes!