Home » Budget Industry » White House Announces Richard V. Spencer as Nominee for SECNAV


White House Announces Richard V. Spencer as Nominee for SECNAV

Flag of the U.S. Secretary of the Navy

Industrialist and former Marine Richard V. Spencer the Trump adminsitration’s nominee for Secretary of the Navy, the White House announced on Friday.

Spencer, who lives in Wyoming, served as Marine aviator from 1976, after graduating from Rollins College, until 1981, according to a bio on the website of the Center for New American Security, where he serves on their advisory board. He left the service as a Captain in 1981. Spencer served as the chief financial officer and vice chairman of the electronic commodities futures exchange Intercontinental Exchange, Inc. until 2008. He’s currently the managing director of Fall Creek Management, LLC.

Richard V. Spencer. CNAS Photo

“Spencer is an impressive personality, knows defense issues very well, and has a strong reputation as a leader and a manager,” CNAS executive vice president Shawn Brimley told USNI News on Thursday.
“He would be a strong candidate for any number of Pentagon positions.”

In December, Spencer was appointed an executive advisor to the Chief of Naval Operations Spencer also served on the Pentagon’s Defense Business Board from 2009 to 2015 and on the CNO’s Executive Panel.

The following is the complete June 2, 2017 statement from The White House.

President Donald J. Trump Announces Intent to Nominate Richard V. Spencer to be Secretary of the Navy

President Donald J. Trump today announced his intent to nominate Richard V. Spencer to be Secretary of the Navy.

If confirmed, Richard V. Spencer of Wyoming will serve as Secretary of the Navy. Spencer most recently served as Managing Partner for Fall Creek Management, LLC, an investment company that supports growing and recently restructured companies. Mr. Spencer has served as the Vice Chairman and Chief Financial Officer for Intercontinental Exchange, Inc., President of Crossroads Group, LLC, and spent the previous 12 years in the finance industry. He also serves on the board of directors for multiple corporate and charitable organizations. Mr. Spencer is a graduate of Rollins College, and the Advanced Management Program at Duke University, Fuqua School of Business. He has also served as a U.S. Marine Corps Captain, and spent five years on the Defense Business Board, most recently as Vice Chairman.

  • Curtis Conway

    My support would solely be based upon his intention to replace the now absent Oliver Hazard Perry Guided Missile Frigates with a similar multi-warfare small surface combatant in similar numbers. Future cost effective presence missions in low-to-medium intensity AORs depend on this development. About 20% of our small surface combatant force was removed, and we have not replaced it with similar capability.

    • DaSaint

      Curtis, you’re generous. I’m not that impressed with his bio. Marine aviator for 5 years, ok, good. But, can’t he find anyone with deeper, longer naval chops than that? Is that the best he can find to nominate as SecNav? Get John Lehman out of retirement!

      • Tari Blalock

        I am in agreement with DaSaint as there are so many other more qualified servicemen and servicewomen who have put in the time and put in the grind. The only reason this guy was nominated was because of his financial background and ties to the Trump family. We need a qualified leader in this position. As a Navy Mom, I expect more and I expect the best.

      • Curtis Conway

        I could go for John. Served when he was SECNAV, and was off Beirut when he was doing his Reserve Duty pumping gas in KA-6D Triple Nickel. He would replace the OHP with something better, probably one for one.

        • RDF

          He came active duty in VA-75 once. Two week thing. Rode tankers.

          • Curtis Conway

            Came out and tanked CAP station off of Beirut. Couple of thousand pounds transferred to both F-14s as I recall.

          • Curtis Conway

            I think he was passing gas in Tripple-Nickle (KA-6D) on Bagle Station to Station 1 CAP (F-14s) right off of Beirut, at about Angels-20.

          • RDF

            We got a message “Ltjg John Leahman USNR enroute Atkron Seven Five for two weeks Acdutra. Itinerary London to meet CINCUSNAVEUR, Brussels NATO Planning Staff, Naples Sixth Fleet AFSOUTH…. ” my skipper had written in red ink in the margin of the message, “…Obviously not your average Ltjg USNR…”

          • Curtis Conway

            He wasn’t on Bagle Station very long. I remember him flying a UH-1N onto our flight deck off VACAPES (yes flew). He came into combat in CIVIES with long hair (non-reg), leather flight jacket, and was just one of the guys . . . SORTA – Those were the days.

          • Curtis Conway

            Don’t know if he remembers the “TORCH”, but I know he will never forget the “SLEEZE”. Sleeze-Torch-Astro-Rocket . . . STAR Control Rocked!

    • RDF

      Perry class single screw with Ray Charles radar, and Helen Keller sonar? Their words. Not mine.

      • Curtis Conway

        OH . . . I’m familiar, but it’s multi-warfare capability before Mk 13 was removed was more than capable compared to LCS, although I like the ASW modules on LCS. It’s the rest of the LCS combat system I have difficulties with. It’s a throw away ship because it cannot defend itself under a determined attack by an adversary, which it will be required to do when on ‘Presence Missions’ during ISE in the COCOM AORs.

        • RDF

          It is borderline loopy to build a man-of-war with a single screw.

          • Submarines have a single screw. Then again we think of everything else as “targets”.

          • RDF

            some subs have twin screws. not ours. but some do.

          • Masau80

            Two screws = twice as noisy. Its all about stealth. Two screws doesn’t make them go faster, just that they go as fast, but with more noise.

          • RDF

            two screws gives you better availability. ask anyone.

          • Masau80

            Available as a target. If two screws were better (and the associated second power plant) I’m pretty sure the Navy would have converted to that set-up over the last 60 years of submarine propulsion. Triton was the last (and only twin reactor) twin screw USN sub and she decommissioned in 1969.

          • RDF

            The navy reliability was good enough that no second was necessary. We are talking about surface men-of-war. Not sub-surface.

          • Masau80

            I was commenting on this from you: “some subs have twin screws. not ours. but some do.” For surface combatants, obviously multiple screws are desired. Ever try to conn a single screw warship – or try and moor one – a challenge.

          • RDF

            My comment was just to a sub guy comment. I conned single screw boats and you know how you have to anticipate wind and currents. Sometimes you just have to make your play and drive it. However, the FFG7 was just a cheap attempt to produce quantities of smallboys. I think McNamara was in there somewhere.

          • Masau80

            “the FFG7 was just a cheap attempt to produce quantities of smallboys.” Substitute LCS for FFG7 and your statement remains valid! At least the FFG had a bigger gun!

          • Curtis Conway

            Once again, I’m in agreement with you. However, a mere recruit is the USN does not get to make such decisions in those days. We had to live with what the force built, delivered and we were required to serve on during our missions. I was fortunate to serve on guided missile cruisers.

          • Love it when the skimmer Navy eats their own! I’m up for three screws on that nuclear powered icebreaker when they build it. Here’s the rational for that: http(colon)//www(dot)dtic(dot)mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/849061(dot)pdf – and we should go back to building submarine sails strong enough to break thru the ice (not that big of a problem since they got rid of the fairwater planes).

  • alaskanexile

    A banker as secnav…smh

    • Michael D. Woods

      At least we’ll get a fighter and manager to replace a politician and social engineer.

  • Billy Norman Williams

    I can see either but with many dubious or over cost weapon systems out there the F35 and littoral ships coming to mind maybe Mr.Spencers background may help and I am sailor marine lol.

  • The Plague

    I think Marines are already over-represented in the Trump government and their job-performance thus far has been below expectations. The Navy is the most complex service, it would need somebody with a lot deeper background than some ex-Marine. Marines are great for limited roles, but they’re half groundhogs, not exactly Nelsons.

    • RDF

      He is an ex-aviator, and experienced electronics manufacturer. All good things. I will gladly take an ex usmc officer from my sister service. Could have been some wall street whiz kid.

    • Masau80

      He was (is) a designated Naval Aviator – that is enough.

      • The Plague

        Now that’s a bit oversimplified, ain’t it ? By the same logic Juan McCain ought to be a saint.

        • Masau80

          John McCain needs to just ride off into the Arizona sunset…

  • publius_maximus_III

    Would have preferred a USN, too. But anything, ANYTHING, would have to be better than Mabus.

    • Michael D. Woods

      Good point. At least we’ll get a fighter and manager to replace a politician and social engineer.

  • John B. Morgen

    I would prefer a retired admiral for the position.