Home » Budget Industry » UPDATED: Carrier USS Abraham Lincoln Leaves Newport News on Sea Trials


UPDATED: Carrier USS Abraham Lincoln Leaves Newport News on Sea Trials

Carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) has left Newport News Shipbuilding on sea trials on Tuesday ahead of the official completion of its refueling and midlife overhaul, according to a Huntington Ingalls Industries.

The “several days” of trials are among the last steps the carrier will undergo before returning to the fleet after the four-year maintenance availability, a spokesperson told USNI News.

“Sea trials will provide an opportunity to test comprehensive shipwide repairs and combat system modernization items worked over the duration of the overhaul,” read a statement from Naval Sea Systems Command.

HII published a picture of Lincoln leaving its berth at the shipyard on Tuesday morning.

The crew of the carrier – who have been aboard since last year – completed a pier-side “fast cruise,” last week in perpetration for the sea trials.

“The fast cruise was Lincoln’s last training simulation before departing Newport News Shipbuilding in Newport News, Virginia. The purpose of the fast cruise was to have the full focus of Lincoln’s crew on training, drills and ship-wide evolutions designed to allow Lincoln and her crew to build the confidence and proficiency to return to sea,” read a statement from the service.
“Since February, the crew has been simulating various underway emergency scenarios to include general quarters, man overboard, abandon ship, propulsion plant casualty drills and fire drills all focused on ensuring Lincoln sailors are performing as an operational team before returning to the fleet.”

Following Lincoln’s departure from Newport News, carrier USS George Washington (CVN-73) is set to enter the dry-dock portion of its availability in August, according to a March announcement from the service.

“Our team has worked hard to get USS Abraham Lincoln ready to re-deliver to the fleet. She has undergone significant combat systems modernization and will also be the first CVN capable of accommodating the F-35C Lightning II,” said Rear Adm. Brian Antonio, program executive officer for aircraft carriers in a statement.

The following is the May 9, 2017 statement from NAVSEA.

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) underway for sea trials following completion of refueling complex overhaul

From Naval Sea Systems Command Public Affairs

WASHINGTON, D.C. – USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) got underway from Newport News, Virginia, May 9, departing for sea trials after completing a 49.5-month refueling complex overhaul (RCOH).

Sea trials will provide an opportunity to test comprehensive shipwide repairs and combat system modernization items worked over the duration of the overhaul.

Over the next several days, CVN 72 Sailors, shipbuilders from Huntington Ingalls Industries-Newport News Shipbuilding (HII-NNS), the Navy’s Supervisor of Shipbuilding, Conversion and Repair and Naval Sea Systems Command personnel will be working side-by-side testing many of the ship’s key systems and technologies.

“Our team has worked hard to get USS Abraham Lincoln ready to re-deliver to the fleet. She has undergone significant combat systems modernization and will also be the first CVN capable of accommodating the F-35C Lightning II,” said Rear Adm. Brian Antonio, program executive officer for aircraft carriers. “This RCOH enables the ship to meet future missions and continued service life requirements for many years to come.”

  • battlestations

    Damn she looks new! Nothing more beautiful than freshly overhauled CVN. I remember when the brand spanking new Vinson was coming out of Newport for her shakedown; we passed each other and all I remember thinking was WOW! I wanted off my ship and on that one. And now for a ding-dong question for those that know; What did they have to do to her to make her f35 capable?

    • chexwarrior

      Probably a flight deck that can take more heat. LHA-6 and LHD-1 got an upgraded deck so they could carry F-35s and heat from the VTOL was a big part of that.

      • Ctrot

        The article said she was modified for F-35C, not F-35B. The C model doesn’t direct any hot exhaust toward the deck.

        • chexwarrior

          Ah, well in that case I don’t know. I doubt the F-35C is heavier than an AWACS plane so the deck and elevators should be able to handle it.

          • delta9991

            If I’m not mistaken, the largest upgrades would be in the installation of support for the ALIS system, upgrades to the briefing rooms because of how much classified data the F-35 can generate, and upgrades to the jet blast deflectors (the F-35s exhaust is concentrated in one location compared to two for the Super).

    • @USS_Fallujah

      Adding a new engine to the CVW requires new maintenance facilities onboard. That’s probably 75% of the charges needed, rest is likely software support.

    • disqus_ixojLQkZsF

      New storage area for the helmets…