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Raytheon Successfully Completes Critical Design Review for AMDR

An artist's conception of the AMDR AN/SPY-6(v) radar onboard an Arleigh Burke Flight III guided missile destroyer (DDG-51). Raytheon Image

An artist’s conception of the AMDR AN/SPY-6(v) radar onboard an Arleigh Burke Flight III guided missile destroyer (DDG-51). Raytheon Image

The Raytheon-built Air and Missile Defense Radar (AMDR) has successfully completed its Navy critical design review (CDR) ahead of more hardware development efforts later this summer, company officials told USNI News this week.

According to the company, the AMDR — now designated AN/SPY-6(v) — passed or exceeded technical performance measures in tests allowing the company to proceed to the next phases of the design and building effort of the radar.

“We have achieved or exceeded all of those technical performance measures,” Tad Dickenson Raytheon’s program manager for AMDR told USNI News this week.
“The basic report card is that we have more than 20 technical performance measures which are anything from simple things — like size weight and power — to more complex things — like jammer suppression or single pulse sensitivity.”

The company had completed the preliminary design review (PDR) for the radar last year.

The AMDR will be the new active electronically scanned array (AESA)S-band radar onboard the Arleigh Burke Flight III guided missile destroyers (DDG-51). The first of the ships will start construction in Fiscal Year 2016 as part of a ten ship multi-year procurement deal the service inked in 2013.

Raytheon is also building a radar suite controller and the Navy will use the Northrop Grumman AN/SPQ-9B (nicknamed: spook 9 Bee) as the X-band radar for the Flight IIIs for now.

The radar promise to provide a 30-times boost in sensitivity over the current Lockheed Martin AV/SPY-1D radars found on current Burkes, the Navy has said.

Raytheon is currently working on an engineering development model ahead of a full radar delivery in May of 2017 to meet the construction schedule of the new Flight IIIs.

  • Curtis Conway

    As long as the core equipment subset for control of the radar remains the same (space, weight, power and cooling), then back-fit to any SSDS ship will basically give you very nearly what the CG-47 Combat System represented (with respect to radar performance only better). If that back-fit includes LCS (whatever you want to call it), then I MIGHT forgive the US Navy for building this hugely expensive, fast and unsurvivable contraption called LCS. Then they better get some weapons with which to defend themselves. They already have the power. How about it Dahlgren?

  • publius_maximus_III

    “The more you sweat in peace, the less you bleed in war.”

    ADM Hyman G. Rickover

  • Secundius

    I suspect it’s Dahlgren, is going to be the BAE 32MJ Rail-Gun…