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A Hundred Years Dry: The U.S. Navy's End of Alcohol at Sea

A Hundred Years Dry: The U.S. Navy’s End of Alcohol at Sea

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Sailors on USS Normandy enjoy a rare beer. With limited exceptions, ships in the US Navy have had no alcohol for a hundred years. US Naval Institute Archives

Sailors on USS Normandy enjoy a rare beer. With limited exceptions, ships in the US Navy have had no alcohol for a hundred years. US Naval Institute Archives

As a flotilla of naval vessels from around the world participates in the Rim of the Pacific Exercise (RIMPAC) to sustain relationships in the maritime community, a century ago this week international navies converged for a remarkably different occasion—to drink the last of the U.S. Navy’s supply of alcohol. Read More

D-Day at 70: The Port of Omaha Beach

D-Day at 70: The Port of Omaha Beach

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Naval Reserve Captain Edmond J. Moran receives urgent and specific instructions from Supreme Allied Commander Europe General Dwight D. Eisenhower on board the destroyer USS Thompson after D-Day. The general ordered Moran back to the United States “for more supplies and equipment to keep the invasion going.”

Naval Reserve Captain Edmond J. Moran receives urgent and specific instructions from Supreme Allied Commander Europe General Dwight D. Eisenhower on board the destroyer USS Thompson after D-Day. The general ordered Moran back to the United States “for more supplies and equipment to keep the invasion going.”

The following post is from the June, 2014 issue of Proceedings. The article was originally titled, ‘A Project So Unique.’ Read More

Through Japanese Eyes: World War II in Japanese Cinema

Through Japanese Eyes: World War II in Japanese Cinema

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eternal zero 2

A film about kamikaze pilots has been playing to packed theaters from Hokkaido to Kyushu since its release in December of 2013, becoming one of the top-grossing Japanese productions of all time. In addition to attracting the admiration of Prime Minster Shinzo Abe, “The Eternal Zero” has drawn a fair amount of criticism for being the latest in a string of recent films that mythologize the Japanese role in World War II. Read More

Opinion: In Defense of Navy's Science and Engineering Emphasis

Opinion: In Defense of Navy’s Science and Engineering Emphasis

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Lt. Brittny Lambert talks to a midshipman about flight operations in the landing signal officer shack aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS William P. Lawrence (DDG-110). US Navy Photo

Lt. Brittny Lambert talks to a midshipman about flight operations in the landing signal officer shack aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS William P. Lawrence (DDG-110). US Navy Photo

According to a recent opinion piece in USNI News, Naval commissioning programs’ preference for officers with science, technology, engineering, or math (STEM) degrees is a misguided policy that will create an officer corps devoid of critical thinking skills. Read More

TV Spies of the Cold War Era

TV Spies of the Cold War Era

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USA and USSR FlagDuring the 1980s with no end of the Cold War in sight, the CIA became alarmed at the number of Soviet spies working for the U.S. who were being arrested and executed. The U.S. network of informants within the USSR was rapidly being dismantled, severely damaging American intelligence gathering capabilities. It became apparent that the CIA had a mole who was compromising their efforts.

Based on the book Circle of Treason by former CIA agent Sandy Grimes, the ABC series The Assets dramatizes the events and investigation leading to the arrest of traitor Aldrich Ames. The show is a grim reminder that the dangers of espionage during the Cold War were very real despite the glamorous, exciting and humorous depiction of spies found in TV series of the era. Read More

Tom Clancy Dies at 66

Tom Clancy Dies at 66

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tomclancyThe father of the techno-thriller and the author of the U.S. Naval Institute’s first novel died on Tuesday, several sources told USNI News.

Tom Clancy, 66, died at a Baltimore hosptial, former Clancy researcher and co-author John Gresham told USNI News on Wednesday.

Read More

Shutdown: Pentagon Restrictions Could Cancel Navy-Air Force Football Game

Shutdown: Pentagon Restrictions Could Cancel Navy-Air Force Football Game

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Naval Academy mascot Bill the Goat stands with midshipmen during the 2012 Army-Navy Game. US Navy Photo

Naval Academy mascot Bill the Goat stands with midshipmen during the 2012 Army-Navy Game. US Navy Photo

The record crowd that is expected to attend the U.S. Naval Academy – U.S. Air Force Academy football game in Annapolis, Md., Saturday may be in for a huge disappointment.

The Department of Defense announced today that all intercollegiate athletic competitions at the service academies have been suspended due to the federal government shutdown. Read More

The Carrier Debate: From 1922 to Now

The Carrier Debate: From 1922 to Now

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USS George Washington (CVN-73) in 2001.

USS George Washington (CVN-73) in 2001.

Even years before its launch, the U.S. Navy’s new class of ships — the aircraft carrier — was dismissed by some critics as an exorbitantly expensive folly that was already obsolete due to advances in modern warfare.

Although this argument has often been levied at USS Gerald R Ford (CVN-78) currently under construction, it was also said about the nation’s first purpose-built carrier USS Ranger (CV-4) in the early 1930s. In the century since the Navy first started experimenting with shipboard takeoffs and landings, analysts have debated the merits versus the weaknesses of aircraft carriers.

Detractors maintain that carriers are too costly and too vulnerable, while proponents have held that the big flattops have consistently proven their worth and will remain the key to sea power well into the future. This battle over carriers has been raging in the pages of the U.S. Naval Institute’s Proceedings magazine for decades: Read More