About US Naval Institute Staff


Recent Posts By the Author


10 Years After Hurricane Katrina: The Sea Service Response

10 Years After Hurricane Katrina: The Sea Service Response

Satellite image provided by the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Monterey, Calif., showing the status of Hurricane Katrina, at 1015Z or just after 5am EST on Aug. 25, 2015. US Navy Photo

Satellite image provided by the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Monterey, Calif., showing the status of Hurricane Katrina, at 1015Z or just after 5am EST on Aug. 29, 2005. US Navy Photo

The following is from the October 2005 issue of Proceedings outlining the early U.S. Coast Guard, Navy and Marine Corps response to the Gulf Coast following landfall of Hurricane Katrina with the original title of, Katrina: What’s Going Right? Read More

The Naval History and HNSA Guide to U.S. Museum Ships

The Naval History and HNSA Guide to U.S. Museum Ships

Navies are tough on their ships.

From commissioning to when they leave the service, naval vessels are driven hard, fulfilling myriad missions and carrying their sailors and marines the world over.

More often than not at the end of their service these ships are sold to allies, scrapped or sometimes sunk to create coral reefs or for target practice.

However, there are some that are preserved as places for the public to get a sense for what life was like for warships and their crews on the high seas. Read More

From the East India Company to Disney to the Cola Wars: A Brief Collection of Non-State Navies

From the East India Company to Disney to the Cola Wars: A Brief Collection of Non-State Navies

Ships on the high seas can largely be split between two major caregories, merchant ships that connect countries through commerce and national navies formed to ensure that trade continues to flow.

However, in the margins between those two broad groups are fleets that have sought to influence international policy and politics independent of a national flag — non-state navies. Read More

Iwo Jima at 70: The Most Reproduced and Parodied Photo in History?

Iwo Jima at 70: The Most Reproduced and Parodied Photo in History?

628x471-2

Photographer Joe Rosenthal admitted that when he took a shot of five Marines and one Navy corpsman raising the U.S. flag on Iwo Jima’s Mt. Suribachi on Feb. 23, 1945, he had no idea that he had captured something extraordinary. He was setting up for a different shot when he spotted the group of men planting the flag and quickly took a snap without even looking through the viewfinder. The chance photo would become iconic overnight and go on to win the Pulitzer Prize.

“Raising the Flag on Iwo Jima” is often cited as being the most reproduced photograph in history. It is also probably the most parodied image in the world. The “Iwo Jima pose” has become a popular symbol for organizations or movements wishing to convey victory, teamwork, or patriotism. The use of the image has ranged from respectful homage to what some consider offensive misappropriation. Read More

WEST: Sea Service Leaders Outline Challenges

WEST: Sea Service Leaders Outline Challenges

Coast Guard commandant Adm. Paul Zukunft, Vice Chief of Naval Operations Michelle Howard and Marine Corps commandant Gen. Joseph Dunford on Feb. 12, 2015. US Naval Institute Photo

Coast Guard commandant Adm. Paul Zukunft, Vice Chief of Naval Operations Michelle Howard and Marine Corps commandant Gen. Joseph Dunford on Feb. 12, 2015. US Naval Institute Photo

Top sea service leaders spoke Wednesday at WEST 2015 of their concerns about the federal budget and acquisition process, their confidence in the state of recruiting, and how forces are adjusting to a world in which combat operations have been dialed back. Read More