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Iwo Jima at 70: The Most Reproduced and Parodied Photo in History?

Iwo Jima at 70: The Most Reproduced and Parodied Photo in History?

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Photographer Joe Rosenthal admitted that when he took a shot of five Marines and one Navy corpsman raising the U.S. flag on Iwo Jima’s Mt. Suribachi on Feb. 23, 1945, he had no idea that he had captured something extraordinary. He was setting up for a different shot when he spotted the group of men planting the flag and quickly took a snap without even looking through the viewfinder. The chance photo would become iconic overnight and go on to win the Pulitzer Prize.

“Raising the Flag on Iwo Jima” is often cited as being the most reproduced photograph in history. It is also probably the most parodied image in the world. The “Iwo Jima pose” has become a popular symbol for organizations or movements wishing to convey victory, teamwork, or patriotism. The use of the image has ranged from respectful homage to what some consider offensive misappropriation. Read More

WEST: Sea Service Leaders Outline Challenges

WEST: Sea Service Leaders Outline Challenges

Coast Guard commandant Adm. Paul Zukunft, Vice Chief of Naval Operations Michelle Howard and Marine Corps commandant Gen. Joseph Dunford on Feb. 12, 2015. US Naval Institute Photo

Coast Guard commandant Adm. Paul Zukunft, Vice Chief of Naval Operations Michelle Howard and Marine Corps commandant Gen. Joseph Dunford on Feb. 12, 2015. US Naval Institute Photo

Top sea service leaders spoke Wednesday at WEST 2015 of their concerns about the federal budget and acquisition process, their confidence in the state of recruiting, and how forces are adjusting to a world in which combat operations have been dialed back. Read More

Unique Ships of the U.S. Navy

Unique Ships of the U.S. Navy

Several similar Arleigh Burke destroyers. US Navy Photo

Several similar Arleigh Burke destroyers. US Navy Photo

Navies like their ships to be as similar as possible – for good reason.

It’s easier to train sailors on similar ships and systems, it’s cheaper to build many ships of the same design in bulk and they’re cheaper to operate and maintain.

Late last year, when the U.S. Navy decided to base its next generation amphibious warship design, the LX(R), on an existing hull it cited cost savings in design, maintenance and manpower as justification.

But occasionally, the mission demands something special, something unique. Read More

A Brief Illustrated History of the Navy Goat

A Brief Illustrated History of the Navy Goat

Bill the Goat leading team in 1970.

Bill the Goat leading team in 1970.

Pacing the sidelines at the weekend’s Army-Navy game will be the U.S. Naval Academy’s famous goat mascot, Bill XXXIII. At first blush, a goat seems to be an unusual mascot for the Navy as opposed to something fiercer and maritime — like a shark or barracuda — but goats have a long history with sailors that led to their revered position at USNA. Read More

Movies About Pearl Harbor

Movies About Pearl Harbor

Promotional painting for the 1970 movie Tora! Tora! Tora! by artist Robert McCall via Airport Journals

Promotional painting for the 1970 movie Tora! Tora! Tora! by artist Robert McCall via Airport Journals

Sunday will mark the 73rd anniversary of the Imperial Japanese Navy’s attack on U.S. military installations on the Hawaiian island of Oahu on Dec. 7, 1941. The following is a brief list of movies and television series about or set around the attack on Pearl Harbor. Read More

A Brief List of Old, Obscure and Obsolete U.S. Navy Jobs

A Brief List of Old, Obscure and Obsolete U.S. Navy Jobs

Due to an editing error, the terms “rate” and “rating” were confused in the introduction of an earlier version of this post. To be clear, a sailor’s rating is their occupational specialty in the service while rate indicates a sailor’s pay grade. USNI News regrets the error.

U.S. Navy enlisted personnel—unlike those in the other services—wear their jobs on their sleeves. A Marine machine-gunner wears similar collar rank as the rest of his fire team; unless you ask him, or see his military occupation in his file, one could never know his job specifics just by looking at his uniform.

Not so in the Navy. Read More

Video: Americans At War

Video: Americans At War

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The following are selections from the U.S. Naval Institute series American’s at War — personal stories of notable American veterans.
More information and videos can be found here.

Read More

A Brief History of Grooming in the U.S. Navy

A Brief History of Grooming in the U.S. Navy

Military grooming standards made news this summer when African American women in the Army and Navy complained about revisions in the regulations governing hair. At least one sailor was discharged for a hairstyle that was unauthorized when the Navy said she couldn’t wear a gas mask properly.

The instance is the latest in a long line of revisions and controversies over military grooming standards in the U.S. Navy going back more than a century.

Read More

The John Walker Spy Ring and The U.S. Navy's Biggest Betrayal

The John Walker Spy Ring and The U.S. Navy’s Biggest Betrayal

US Naval Institute Photo Illustration

US Naval Institute Photo Illustration

Notorious spy John Walker died on Aug. 28, 2014. The following is a story outlining Walker’s spy ring from the June 2010 issue of U.S. Naval Institute’s Naval History Magazine with the original title: The Navy’s Biggest Betrayal.

Twenty-five years ago the FBI finally shut off the biggest espionage leak in U.S. Navy history when it arrested former senior warrant officer John A. Walker. Read More