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CBO: Navy's Next Nuclear Attack Submarine Could Cost $5.5B a Hull

CBO: Navy’s Next Nuclear Attack Submarine Could Cost $5.5B a Hull

Virginia-class fast-attack submarine USS Missouri (SSN-780) on May 31, 2018. US Navy Photo

The Navy’s next-generation attack submarine program may cost $69 billion more than the service is planning to spend, according to a Congressional Budget Office estimate released this week, creating a major delta between the Navy’s long-term shipbuilding cost estimates and CBO’s. Read More

Amphibious Ops, Air Defense Key in Philippines Exercise With U.S., Japanese Forces

Amphibious Ops, Air Defense Key in Philippines Exercise With U.S., Japanese Forces

Marine Lance Cpl. David Lancheros shares his knowledge about the engagement process of a FIM-92 stinger missile with Philippine Airman 2nd class Sherwin Faoeranga during a subject matter expert exchange as part of exercise KAMANDAG 3 at Colonel Ernesto P. Ravina Air Base, Philippines on Oct. 9, 2019. US Marine Corps Photo

U.S. Marines are sharpening their amphibious skills right alongside amphibious assault vehicle crews of Philippine Marines and Japanese sea soldiers in a series of exercises that aim to tighten cooperation between the three nations. Read More

SOUTHCOM Will Keep Amphib USS Wasp Busy During Transit

SOUTHCOM Will Keep Amphib USS Wasp Busy During Transit

USS Wasp (LHD-1) transits the Coral Sea on Aug. 1, 2019. US Navy Photo

WASHINGTON, D.C. – As USS Wasp (LHD-1) rounds the horn from the Pacific to the Atlantic Ocean, the commander of U.S. Southern Command plans to use the big-deck amphibious warship for as much training as possible. Read More

Berger: Marines Focused on China in Developing New Way to Fight in the Pacific

Berger: Marines Focused on China in Developing New Way to Fight in the Pacific

Marines assigned to the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) Maritime Raid Force prepare to board the amphibious dock landing ship USS Ashland (LSD-48) from a Rigid-Hull Inflatable Boat (RHIB) on June 23, 2019. US Marine Corps Photo

THE PENTAGON – The Marine Corps continues its drive to become a more agile and maritime-focused force that can respond to tensions quickly and buy decision space for military leaders and diplomats, the commandant said. Read More

Admiral: U.S. Needs More Ships in Europe to Counter Growing Russian Threats

Admiral: U.S. Needs More Ships in Europe to Counter Growing Russian Threats

Lt. j.g. Melissa Jock observes a replenishment-at-sea between the fast combat support ship USNS Arctic (T-AOE) and the aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) on May 10, 2018. US Navy Photo

ANNAPOLIS, Md. – The head of Naval Forces Europe is making a pitch for more ships to provide presence, training and crisis response capability in his area of the world, even as tensions are rising globally. Read More

Navy, Marines Rethinking How to Build Future Fleet with Unmanned, Expeditionary Ships

Navy, Marines Rethinking How to Build Future Fleet with Unmanned, Expeditionary Ships

USS America (LHA-6) transits the Pacific Ocean near Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) in 2018. US Navy

THE PENTAGON – Though the Navy had already advertised it was updating its desired fleet size and composition, after a 2016 effort pegged the future fleet at 355 ships, the service is now taking an even bigger step: working on an Integrated Naval Force Structure Assessment that also includes emerging unmanned and expeditionary platforms to support new concepts of warfare, according to a memo signed by the chief of naval operations and commandant of the Marine Corps. Read More

Faulty $5 Parts Cause 18-Month, $1 Billion Delay to Navy, Air Force Nuclear Upgrades

Faulty $5 Parts Cause 18-Month, $1 Billion Delay to Navy, Air Force Nuclear Upgrades

An unarmed Trident II D5 missile launches from the Ohio-class ballistic missile submarine USS Nebraska (SSBN-739) off the coast of California. US Navy Photo

Defects found in a $5 electrical component will delay the Navy and Air Force nuclear warhead refurbishment program by 18 months and cost more than $1 billion to fix, a National Nuclear Security Administration official said during a congressional hearing Wednesday.

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