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Judge Orders Navy to Release USS Thresher Disaster Documents

Judge Orders Navy to Release USS Thresher Disaster Documents

Launch of USS Thresher in 1960. Naval Institute Archives

WASHINGTON, D.C. – A U.S. District Court judge ordered the Navy to start releasing unclassified documents related to the sinking of USS Thresher (SSN-593), 57 years after 129 officers, sailors and shipbuilders died in the nation’s worst nuclear submarine disaster.

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SECARMY Memo: Military Medical Reform Effort Risks Combat Healthcare Quality, R&D

SECARMY Memo: Military Medical Reform Effort Risks Combat Healthcare Quality, R&D

Dr. Brian Wong prepares for a laboratory study at Naval Medical Research Unit Dayton’s (NAMRU-Dayton_ Environmental Health Effects Laboratory. Dr. Wong designs studies to determine potential health effects associated with exposure to environmental stressors to address the Unites States Navy and the Department of Defense needs. Navy photo.

U.S. Army officials worry a lack of planning and poor funding for a pending consolidation of how the Pentagon manages military public health and medical research activities will result in dire battlefield consequences.

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As Russian Submarines Lurk, 2nd Fleet Conducting Tougher Training of East Coast Ships

As Russian Submarines Lurk, 2nd Fleet Conducting Tougher Training of East Coast Ships

U.S. Marines with the 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) and Sailors with the Amphibious Squadron (PHIBRON) 8 provide security for the Bataan Amphibious Ready Group (ARG) during Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) in the Atlantic Ocean on Oct. 22, 2019. US Marine Corps Photo

WASHINGTON, D.C. – U.S. 2nd Fleet is having deploying units test out new complex tactics on their way across the Atlantic, with each of these so-called Fleet Battle Problems contributing to an overall maturation of the concepts the Navy would use in a peer adversary fight, the commander said on Tuesday. Read More

SECNAV Modly: Path to 355 Ships Will Rely on New Classes of Warships

SECNAV Modly: Path to 355 Ships Will Rely on New Classes of Warships

The Honorable Thomas Modly, acting Secretary of the Navy, talks with Capt. John J. Cummings, USS Gerald R. Ford'(CVN 78) commanding officer, in the ship’s pilothouse. Modly embarked Ford after the ship successfully completed Aircraft Compatibility Testing to discuss Ford’s progress and to see the ship operate at sea. US Navy photo.

The Navy’s plans to get to 355 manned ships by 2030 will rely on new classes of ships that don’t exist yet – including new kinds of amphibious and supply ships as well as “lightly manned” ships – the acting Navy secretary told USNI News. Read More

Navy, Industry Pursuing Autonomy Software, Reliable HM&E Systems for Unmanned Ships

Navy, Industry Pursuing Autonomy Software, Reliable HM&E Systems for Unmanned Ships

Medium Displacement Unmanned Surface Vehicle (MDUSV) prototype Sea Hunter pulls into Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii on Oct. 31, 2018. US Navy Photo

ARLINGTON, Va. – As the Navy moves forward with unmanned surface and undersea vessels in a range of sizes for myriad missions, some things remain constant among the vehicles: they’ll all need to continue making improvements in autonomy, they’ll all need parts that are reliable enough to go without human intervention for weeks or months at a time, and they’ll all need power sources for their long journeys. Read More

DoD IG: Inaccurate Military Surge Sealift Fleet Readiness Reporting Undercuts Operational Plans

DoD IG: Inaccurate Military Surge Sealift Fleet Readiness Reporting Undercuts Operational Plans

SATTAHIP, Thailand—A UH-60 Black Hawk is raised from Military Sealift Command’s voyage-charter, general-purpose, heavy-lift vessel MV Ocean Grand at the pier in Sattahip, Thailand, Aug. 17, during an offload of equipment that will be used during exercise Hanuman Guardian 2018. (Courtesy photo/Released)

Inaccurate surge sealift fleet readiness reporting misled geographic combatant commanders about their ability to quickly receive equipment resupplies, according to a Department of Defense Inspector General’s report. Read More