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Tom Clancy Dies at 66

Tom Clancy Dies at 66

tomclancyThe father of the techno-thriller and the author of the U.S. Naval Institute’s first novel died on Tuesday, several sources told USNI News.

Tom Clancy, 66, died at a Baltimore hosptial, former Clancy researcher and co-author John Gresham told USNI News on Wednesday.

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Shutdown: Navy Public Shipyards Furlough Thousands

Shutdown: Navy Public Shipyards Furlough Thousands

Puget Sound Naval Shipyard removes propeller four from USS John C. Stennis (CVN-74) for maintenance. US Navy Photo

Puget Sound Naval Shipyard removes propeller four from USS John C. Stennis (CVN-74) for maintenance. US Navy Photo

The Navy’s four public shipyards will all suffer furloughs that may affect Naval Sea Systems Command’s (NAVSEA) ability to conduct ship maintenance, Navy officials told USNI News on Tuesday.

Thousands of workers at the shipyards have been told to stay at home as the standoff between House Republicans and the Obama administration over a pending continuing resolution measure continues.

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Government Shutdown: The Basics

Government Shutdown: The Basics

A Senate panel has rejected a Pentagon request to open a new round of base closures.

A Senate panel has rejected a Pentagon request to open a new round of base closures.

With the House voting again to delay for a year the start of the Affordable Care Act and repealing a tax on medical devices that helps pay for the measure, a partial shutdown of the federal government this week appears nearer. The Senate is expected to take up and reject the bill when it convenes today, likely in the middle of the afternoon. Read More

Interview: Randy Forbes on Sequestration, the Navy and China

Interview: Randy Forbes on Sequestration, the Navy and China

 

Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus speaks with Randy Forbes in Forbes' office on June 13, 2013. US Navy Photos

Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus speaks with Randy Forbes in Forbes’ office on June 13, 2013. US Navy Photo

Rep. Randy Forbes (R-VA) — chairman of the House Armed Services Seapower and Projection Forces subcommittee — sat down with USNI News on Sept. 18 to talk about the challenges of sequestration, how he feels about the Littoral Combat Ship program, China, what the Navy is doing right and—more important—what the Navy is doing wrong. Read More

Opinion: The Danger of Neutral Warships Entering a Combat Zone

Opinion: The Danger of Neutral Warships Entering a Combat Zone

Sailors assigned to the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Barry (DDG-52) perform small boat operations alongside the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Gravely (DDG-107). US Navy Photo

Sailors assigned to the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Barry (DDG-52) perform small boat operations alongside the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Gravely (DDG-107). US Navy Photo

The eastern Mediterranean, off the Syrian coast, presently is saturated with U.S. and Russian warships. The United States has deployed the destroyers USS Stout, Mahan, Ramage, Barry and Gravely, each armed with large numbers of Tomahawk land-attack missiles. The Russian navy announced that it has seven warships in the eastern Mediterranean and that it is sending three more warships—the cruiser Moskva, the destroyer Smetlivy, and the assault ship Nikolai Filchenkov. All of those warships are sailing relatively close to the Syrian civil war’s combat zone. Read More

A Brief History of Naval Wargames

A Brief History of Naval Wargames

navalwargamesFor more than 100 years, the U.S. Navy has simulated naval warfare with simulations, or games. As far back as the 19th century the Navy recognized that gaming and simulations are an inexpensive and bloodless way to learn lessons that typically are imparted only during wartime.

The use of games traditionally has had multiple purposes. The foremost is to train for war. Simulating warfare gives those involved the closest possible experience they can have to actual warfare, thus giving them a modicum of experience under fire. It is an inexpensive way to train without the expense of taking ships and aircraft to sea, particularly in periods of austerity. Read More