Tag Archives: Whidbey Island-class

N95 Coffman Says Accelerate Big Deck Amphib Construction, Cut LSD Modernization Program

N95 Coffman Says Accelerate Big Deck Amphib Construction, Cut LSD Modernization Program

 

The Kearsarge Amphibious Ready Group steams in formation on Dec. 24, 2018. Navy photo.

This post has been updated to reflect that the Navy is looking at truncating the modernization period for USS Whidbey Island, the next to go into a planned layup period. Due to source error, this story previously said the Navy was eyeing USS Tortuga, which is currently in a yard for modernization.

ARLINGTON, Va. – In an attempt to address a “capacity problem” in the amphibious ship fleet, the head of expeditionary warfare wants to accelerate the construction of new amphibious assault ships and stop a lengthy upgrade program for the aging LSDs to return them to fleet operations. Read More

HII Closes Sale of Shuttered Avondale Shipyard

HII Closes Sale of Shuttered Avondale Shipyard

Avondale Shipyard in New Orleans. The yard historically built amphibious ships for the U.S. Navy. Owners are now exploring using the yard for manufacturing oil and gas infrastructure. Google Photo

Huntington Ingalls Industries closed the sale of its Avondale shipbuilding facility to a joint venture between an industrial redevelopment company and marine terminal operator.

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Navy Could Extend Life of Amphibs to 50 Years,  LCS for 35, If Navy Invests in their Upkeep

Navy Could Extend Life of Amphibs to 50 Years, LCS for 35, If Navy Invests in their Upkeep

The Whidbey Island-class amphibious dock landing ship USS Rushmore (LSD 47), foreground, the Wasp-class amphibious assault ship USS Essex (LHD 2), middle, and the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer Wayne E. Meyer (DDG 108) transit the Pacific Ocean during Dawn Blitz 2017. US Navy photo.

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The Navy could keep its amphibious ships in service for more than 50 years and its Littoral Combat Ships for up to 35 years, as the service looks for ways to increase the size of the fleet in the nearer term by extending the life of today’s ships, according to Naval Sea Systems Command. Read More