Tag Archives: US Air force

New Possible Chinese Radar Installation on South China Sea Artificial Island Could Put U.S., Allied Stealth Aircraft at Risk

New Possible Chinese Radar Installation on South China Sea Artificial Island Could Put U.S., Allied Stealth Aircraft at Risk

A Jan. 24, 2016 image of Cuarteron Reef in the South China Sea with what is likely a high frequency radar array. CSIS Asian Maritime Transparency Initiative, DigitalGlobe Image used with permission.

A Jan. 24, 2016 image of Cuarteron Reef in the South China Sea with what is likely a high frequency radar array. CSIS Asian Maritime Transparency Initiative, DigitalGlobe Image used with permission.

This post has been updated to include additional comments from the Department of Defense.

A possible new Chinese radar installation in the South China Sea could put American and allied stealth aircraft at risk as part of a wider detection network similar to U.S. efforts to find Russian bombers in the Cold War. Read More

Opinion: Stealth Matters

Opinion: Stealth Matters

A screen capture from a Northrop Grumman advertisement. Northrop Grumman Image

A screen capture from a Northrop Grumman advertisement. Northrop Grumman Image

The U.S. Air Force selected Northrop Grumman Corp. to develop and build the new Long-Range Strike Bomber (LRS-B) late last year. Like other recent big defense contracts, that award is under protest from competitors. But it’s a good bet the Air Force source selection was a sound one. Why? Because stealth matters. Read More

U.S. STRATCOM Commander Haney Defends U.S. Nuclear Triad

U.S. STRATCOM Commander Haney Defends U.S. Nuclear Triad

Adm. Cecil D. Haney, commander of U.S. Strategic Command, delivers remarks as guest speaker during a change of command ceremony for Commander, Submarine Forces aboard the attack submarine USS Newport News (SSN-750) on Sept. 11, 2015. US Navy Photo

Adm. Cecil D. Haney, commander of U.S. Strategic Command, delivers remarks as guest speaker during a change of command ceremony for Commander, Submarine Forces aboard the attack submarine USS Newport News (SSN-750) on Sept. 11, 2015. US Navy Photo


Maintaining and modernizing the nation’s nuclear triad isn’t debatable even in times of tight budgets said the officer in charge of U.S. strategic forces on Friday Read More

Essay: Building a Mediterranean Arc of Stability for America's Long War

Essay: Building a Mediterranean Arc of Stability for America’s Long War

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The United States is truly involved in a Long War. While the Army and Marine Corps have enjoyed long periods between combat operations, the Air Force and naval aviation have been continuously deployed for combat since the just after the Iraqis invaded Kuwait in August of 1990. Continuous combat operations have now stretched for twenty-five years, making our commitment to the Middle East the longest war involving a major Western power since the Thirty Years’ War, which ended in 1648. Read More

Panel Suggests Goldwater-Nichols Revisions to Senate

Panel Suggests Goldwater-Nichols Revisions to Senate

U.S. Capitol on July 31, 2015, NASA Photo

U.S. Capitol on July 31, 2015, NASA Photo

Rethinking the role of the regional combatant commands, cutting the Pentagon’s support structure and putting the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff back in the operational chain of command structure were ideas offered to the Senate Armed Services Committee Tuesday as it revisited the almost 30-year-old Goldwater-Nichols Act. Read More

Essay: Strategies That Matter — One Size Fits None

Essay: Strategies That Matter — One Size Fits None

Lockheed Martin F-117 Nighthawk over Iraq. US Air Force Photo

Lockheed Martin F-117 Nighthawk over Iraq. US Air Force Photo

Airpower advocates exited the Gulf War trumpeting an unambiguous victory for airpower—and they were right. The air campaign against Iraq was well planned, brilliantly tailored to the adversary, and superbly executed. But it was also a clear example where the enemy was outclassed from the very beginning. Coalition forces were allowed an unfettered buildup, and had clear advantages in numbers, training, equipment and a doctrine designed to defeat massed Soviet and Soviet-client forces under adverse conditions. They faced a surrounded enemy who allowed the Coalition force to seize the initiative (despite ample warning) and keep it throughout the conflict. The Iraqi military at the time was postured to lose, and lose big. Read More