Tag Archives: Portsmouth Naval Shipyard

Navy Plans to Spend $21B Over 20 Years to Optimize, Modernize Public Shipyards

Navy Plans to Spend $21B Over 20 Years to Optimize, Modernize Public Shipyards

The Los Angeles-class attack submarine USS Helena (SSN 725) arrives at Norfolk Naval Shipyard in August 2015 for a high-priority docking continuous maintenance availability. US Navy photo.

CAPITOL HILL – The Navy will execute a $21-billion, 20-year public shipyard optimization plan as a series of small projects that can be done even as maintenance work on submarines and aircraft carriers continues at the yards, the assistant secretary of the Navy for research, development and acquisition told senators today. Read More

GAO Recommends Smarter Planning for Naval Shipyard Upgrades Amid Growing Backlog of Yard Repairs, Modernization

GAO Recommends Smarter Planning for Naval Shipyard Upgrades Amid Growing Backlog of Yard Repairs, Modernization

Sailors assigned to the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) observe as the ship pulls into Norfolk Naval Shipyard in Portsmouth, Va., on Aug. 5, 2017. US Navy photo.

The Government Accountability Office recommended the Navy revisit its plans to improve and modernize its four public shipyards – something the service is already in the midst of – after finding that the yards’ overall condition remains poor and the timeline and cost to achieve the Navy’s full list of needed improvements continue to grow. Read More

Interview: NAVSEA 'Headed in the Right Direction' After Years of Maintenance Backlogs

Interview: NAVSEA ‘Headed in the Right Direction’ After Years of Maintenance Backlogs

Dry Dock 1 at Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard is flooded during the undocking of the Los Angeles-class fast attack submarine USS City of Corpus Christi (SSN 705) on May 18, 2010. US Navy photo.

This post has been updated to correct which aircraft carrier is set for an upcoming docking availability.

WASHINGTON NAVY YARD — The Navy has faced massive backlogs of submarine and aircraft carrier maintenance work at its four public shipyards in recent years, at times pushing nearly ten percent of its workload into the next year.

But if 2017 was the year that bow wave of deferred maintenance caught the attention of lawmakers, it was also the year the Navy made great strides in addressing the problem – despite having a ten percent higher than average workload this year, the yards will end the year with about a quarter of the maintenance backlog they began the year with, the Naval Sea Systems Command commander Vice Adm. Tom Moore told USNI News. Read More