Tag Archives: Norfolk Naval Shipyard

Navy Claims Victories in Modernizing Public Yards While Congress Questions Pace

Navy Claims Victories in Modernizing Public Yards While Congress Questions Pace

USS Boise (SSN 764) arrived at Huntington Ingalls Industries’ Newport News Shipbuilding division to begin its 25-month extended engineering overhaul on June 18, 2018, but ultimately had to return to Naval Station Norfolk to continue awaiting maintenance because there was no room at Newport News for the sub amid two other boats’ maintenance overruns. Huntington Ingalls Industries’ photo.

The Navy is moving into the next phase of a wholesale revision of its ship maintenance infrastructure. Last week, the service announced it had started to digitally map the layout of its centuries-old Norfolk Naval Shipyard as it seeks to bring new technology and a more efficient workflow to the public yards. Read More

Navy: Norfolk Naval Shipyard CO Removed Over Poor On-Time Maintenance Rates

Navy: Norfolk Naval Shipyard CO Removed Over Poor On-Time Maintenance Rates

Capt. Kai Torkelson. US Navy Photo

This post has been updated to include additional information from NAVSEA regarding who will take command of Norfolk Naval Shipyard next.

The commander of Norfolk Naval Shipyard has been relieved of duty related to the yard’s ongoing performance struggles in repairing and modernizing nuclear-powered submarines and aircraft carriers, officials told USNI News on Monday. Read More

GAO: Naval Shipyards Still Under-Resourced; Delays On Sub, Carrier Work Will Continue

GAO: Naval Shipyards Still Under-Resourced; Delays On Sub, Carrier Work Will Continue

USS Jefferson City (SSN-759) departs Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard after completing an engineering overhaul to prolong the life of the submarine. US Navy Photo

It’s no secret that the Navy’s four public shipyards have prioritized attack submarines last, instead of focusing the yards’ limited resources on aircraft carrier maintenance and ballistic missile submarine refuelings. But even though the SSBN refuelings are drawing to an end, which should free up resources for SSN maintenance, a Government Accountability Office report released today states the time SSNs will sit idle waiting for maintenance work to begin will actually continue to increase for the next two years. Read More

NAVSEA Says Attack Sub Repairs Much Improved as USS Boise Enters Yard Following 4-Year Wait

NAVSEA Says Attack Sub Repairs Much Improved as USS Boise Enters Yard Following 4-Year Wait

The Los Angeles-class attack submarine USS Boise (SSN 764) enters Souda Bay, Greece, during a scheduled port visit on Dec. 23, 2014. Boise conducted naval operations in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of responsibility in support of U.S. national security interests in Europe during its last deployment that ended in January 2015 — and the submarine has been awaiting a maintenance availability ever since, due to limited capacity in public and private yards. US Navy photo.

After years of struggling to conduct attack submarine maintenance – with the four public naval shipyards prioritizing SSN work last, behind a backlog of ballistic-missile sub and aircraft carrier work, and private shipyards finding it tough to resume submarine repair work after years of only doing new construction – the Navy appears back on track for its SSN maintenance, the head of Naval Sea Systems Command told USNI News. Read More

Navy Believes IKE Maintenance Overrun Was Ship-Specific, Not Indication of Classwide Issue

Navy Believes IKE Maintenance Overrun Was Ship-Specific, Not Indication of Classwide Issue

USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) departs Naval Station Norfolk, Va. as Commander, U.S. 2nd Fleet orders U.S. Navy ships and aircraft in the area to sortie on Sept. 4 ahead of Hurricane Dorian. US Navy Photo

This post has been updated to correct that two organizations that facilitate coordination and lessons learned on carrier maintenance are longstanding organizations.

ARLINGTON, Va. – The Navy does not believe that carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) overran its last maintenance period because of classwide issues that could affect the next ships as they age, but rather the work tripled in length due to challenges specific to that hull and the shipyard at that time. Read More