Tag Archives: F/A-18A/D Hornet

Marines Identify Hornet Pilot Who Died After Crash with KC-130J off Japan; 5 Marines Still Missing

Marines Identify Hornet Pilot Who Died After Crash with KC-130J off Japan; 5 Marines Still Missing

Marines with the Marine All-Weather Fighter Attack Bats Squadron 242 (VMFA (AW)-242 Bats), Marine Air Group 12, 1st Marine Aircraft Wing before taking off in the F/A-18D Hornet at Marine Corps Air Station Futenma, Okinawa, Japan on Nov. 21, 2018. US Marine Corps Photo

The Marines have identified the F/A-18D Hornet pilot who died in a hospital after a crash with a KC-130J off the coast of Japan. Read More

UPDATED: 5 Marines Still Missing Following F-18 Hornet, KC-130J Crash; Second Recovered Marine Dies in Hospital

UPDATED: 5 Marines Still Missing Following F-18 Hornet, KC-130J Crash; Second Recovered Marine Dies in Hospital

Marines with the Joint Humanitarian Assistance Survey Team, 3rd Marine Expeditionary Brigade, prepare for take-off aboard a KC-130J Hercules aircraft on Kadena Air Force Base on Sept. 27, 2018. US Marine Corps Photo

A Marine recovered from a crash between a Marine F-18D Hornet Fighter and a KC-130J transport aircraft off the coast of Japan has died in the hospital, according to a statement from the service. Read More

UPDATED: 1 Rescued Alive After Marine Corps F-18, KC-130J Crash Off the Coast of Japan

UPDATED: 1 Rescued Alive After Marine Corps F-18, KC-130J Crash Off the Coast of Japan

An F/A-18D Hornet with Marine All-Weather Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 242 and a KC-130J Hercules with Marine Aerial Refueler Transport Squadron (VMGR) 152 conduct simulated aerial refueling during the 41st Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force – Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni Friendship Day at MCAS Iwakuni, Japan, May 5, 2017. US Marine Corps photo.

This post will be updated as more information becomes available.

Two Marine Corps aircraft have been involved in a mishap off the coast of Japan, according to a Marine Corps news release. Read More

Boeing Touts Block III Super Hornet's Better Range, Improved Digital Connectivity to Fleet

Boeing Touts Block III Super Hornet’s Better Range, Improved Digital Connectivity to Fleet

An artist’s concept of a F/A-18E Block III. Boeing Image

ARLINGTON, Va. — They will be a little bit stealthier, pack a more powerful punch, fly with increased stamina and carry a more robust communication and targeting systems. That’s how Boeing officials talked up the benefits of the Block III F/A-18E/F Super Hornets as they prepare to start rolling off the production line next year.

Read More

First Super Hornet Inducted Into Service Life Extension Program

First Super Hornet Inducted Into Service Life Extension Program

An F/A-18F Super Hornet assigned to the “Gladiators” of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 106 lands on the flight deck of the Nimitz-class carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72). US Navy Photo

ST. LOUIS, Mo. — The first F/A-18F that will have its service life extended beyond 6,000 flight hours arrived at Boeing on Thursday. Read More

New Navy Budget Request Moves Money Toward Top Two Aviation Safety Priorities

New Navy Budget Request Moves Money Toward Top Two Aviation Safety Priorities

Naval Aircrewman (Helicopter) 2nd Class Joshua White, assigned to the “Black Knights” of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 4, sits in the gunner’s seat of an MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopter on July 21, 2016. US Navy Photo

The Navy’s top two aviation safety priorities could benefit from a half-billion-dollar bump in funding for aircraft modification kits if the service’s fiscal year 2019 budget request is approved. Read More

Congress Frustrated at Progress of Fighter Physiological Episode Investigations While Navy Back to Full Pilot Production After T-45C Fixes

Congress Frustrated at Progress of Fighter Physiological Episode Investigations While Navy Back to Full Pilot Production After T-45C Fixes

Pilots perform pre-flight procedures in T-45C Goshawks from Training Air Wing One (TRAWING) 1 on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS George Washington (CVN 73) on Dec. 10, 2016. US Navy photo.

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The Navy isn’t moving fast enough to fix the ongoing systemic physiological episodes that have plagued fighter pilots and flight students, members of the House Armed Services Committee said on Tuesday. Read More

Physiological Episodes Down in the Navy After Slew of Changes; New Pilot Production Rate Nearly Back to Normal

Physiological Episodes Down in the Navy After Slew of Changes; New Pilot Production Rate Nearly Back to Normal

Commander, Naval Air Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet Vice Adm. Mike Shoemaker speaks with sailors in Atsugi, Japan on March 23, 2016. US Navy Photo

WASHINGTON, D.C. — The Navy’s multi-pronged efforts to address hypoxia, decompression sickness and other physiological episodes (PEs) in its F-18 and T-45 aircrew are showing positive results, with the number of PE events down in most aircraft types and the T-45C Goshawk trainers set to resume full operations by the end of the month, according to the commander of Naval Air Forces. Read More

Boeing Examining High-Use Super Hornets to Validate Life-Extension Plans; Already Buying Material, Setting Up Facility

Boeing Examining High-Use Super Hornets to Validate Life-Extension Plans; Already Buying Material, Setting Up Facility

An F/A-18E Super Hornet assigned to the Stingers of Strike Fighter Attack Squadron (VFA) 113 prepares to land on the flight deck aboard the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71). US Navy photo.

The Boeing team preparing for the F/A-18E-F Super Hornet service life modification (SLM) program has begun tearing into one of the fleet’s most-used aircraft and found the plane does not have as much age-related damage as predicted, the company’s service life modification program director told USNI News. Read More

Report to Congress: Out of Breath - Military Aircraft Oxygen Issues

Report to Congress: Out of Breath – Military Aircraft Oxygen Issues

The following is the June 21, 2017 CRS Insight brief to Congress, Out of Breath: Military Aircraft Oxygen Issues.

The Air Force recently grounded some of its newest aircraft, F-35A strike fighters, due to incidents in which pilots became physiologically impaired with symptoms of oxygen deficiency while flying. Although the root cause of the F-35 incidents has not yet been established, the grounding has renewed attention on hypoxia, a physical condition caused by oxygen deficiency that may result in temporary cognitive and physiological impairment and possible loss of consciousness. Hypoxia has affected pilots of F-22, F/A-18, and T-45 aircraft in recent years. Read More