Tag Archives: CVN-74

SPAWAR Chief: CANES Installation Time Cut in Half

SPAWAR Chief: CANES Installation Time Cut in Half

CANES units bound for installation aboard the aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76) are loaded and tested in the SPAWAR Network Integration and Engineering Facility prior to fleet delivery in June 2014. US Navy photo.

CANES units bound for installation aboard the aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76) are loaded and tested in the SPAWAR Network Integration and Engineering Facility prior to fleet delivery in June 2014. US Navy photo.

SAN DIEGO, Calif. — Three years into its plan to modernize fleet tactical networks, the Navy has sliced by more than half the time it’s taking to install the Consolidated Afloat Networks and Enterprise System on aircraft carriers and other ships and submarines. Read More

Stennis CO Talks Deployment: Dual Carrier Ops, Chinese Interactions

Stennis CO Talks Deployment: Dual Carrier Ops, Chinese Interactions

Vice President Joe Biden meets with Capt. Greg Huffman, USS John C. Stennis’ (CVN 74) commanding officer, on the bridge aboard USS John C. Stennis during the Rim of the Pacific maritime exercise on July 14, 2016. US Navy photo.

Vice President Joe Biden meets with Capt. Greg Huffman, USS John C. Stennis’ (CVN 74) commanding officer, on the bridge aboard USS John C. Stennis during the Rim of the Pacific maritime exercise on July 14, 2016. US Navy photo.

Last month the aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis (CVN-74) returned home from a seven-month deployment to the Western Pacific – the first time in several years a carrier from the continental United States had deployed specifically to that region rather than simply passing through on the way to and from the Middle East.

In addition to highlighting a shift in focus to the Pacific, the deployment featured an opportunity to practice high-end warfighting skills with another U.S. carrier strike group, several exercises with allies and partners in the region, and persistent but professional contact with Chinese ships sent to shadow Stennis.

Stennis Commanding Officer Capt. Greg Huffman detailed the highlights of the deployment in an interview with USNI News. Read More

Aircraft Carrier Stennis Returns Home After 7-Month Indo-Pacific Deployment

Aircraft Carrier Stennis Returns Home After 7-Month Indo-Pacific Deployment

Sailors, family and friends watch as aircraft from Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 9 fly in formation above USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) during an air power demonstration on Aug. 7, 2016, during the tiger cruise, which is an opportunity for Sailors to invite their family and friends to experience life underway aboard a Navy ship. US Navy photo.

Sailors, family and friends watch as aircraft from Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 9 fly in formation above USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) during an air power demonstration on Aug. 7, 2016, during the ship’s tiger cruise, an opportunity for Sailors to invite their family and friends to experience life underway aboard a Navy ship. US Navy photo.

Aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis (CVN-74) returned home to Bremerton, Wash., yesterday after seven months patrolling the South China Sea, serving as flagship of the first Great Green Fleet carrier strike group and participating in the Rim of the Pacific 2016 exercise. Read More

Biden Tours U.S. Carrier Stennis: Praises Sailors, Chides China

Biden Tours U.S. Carrier Stennis: Praises Sailors, Chides China

Vice President Joe Biden on July 14, 2016 speaking to sailors on USS John C. Stennis (CVN-74). USNI News Photo

Vice President Joe Biden on July 14, 2016 speaking to sailors on USS John C. Stennis (CVN-74). USNI News Photo

ABOARD AIRCRAFT CARRIER USS JOHN C. STENNIS – Vice President Joe Biden thanked sailors aboard aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis (CVN-74) for affirming U.S. presence and partnership with Asian allies during its seven-month Pacific deployment and denouncing Chinese territorial expansion. Read More

Chinese Warships Now Training with Ships from U.S. Carrier Strike Group

Chinese Warships Now Training with Ships from U.S. Carrier Strike Group

Chinese and U.S. ships on June 25, 2016. Chinese Ministry of Defense Photo

Chinese and U.S. ships on June 25, 2016. Chinese Ministry of Defense Photo

CLARIFICATION: The PLAN ships bound for RIMPAC were accompanied by two ships from the Stennis Carrier Strike Group, not the entire CSG.

Five ships from the People’s Liberation Army Navy are training with ships from a U.S. carrier strike group ahead of next month’s Rim of the Pacific 2016 exercises, a Navy official confirmed to USNI News on Monday. Read More

Video: Reagan, Stennis CSGs Practice 'High-End Warfighting' In Philippine Sea

Video: Reagan, Stennis CSGs Practice ‘High-End Warfighting’ In Philippine Sea

The Nimitz-class aircraft carriers USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74), center, and USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76) conduct dual aircraft carrier strike group operations in the U.S. 7th Fleet area of operations in support of security and stability in the Indo-Asia-Pacific on June 18, 2016. US Navy photo.

The Nimitz-class aircraft carriers USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74), center, and USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76) conduct dual aircraft carrier strike group operations in the U.S. 7th Fleet area of operations in support of security and stability in the Indo-Asia-Pacific on June 18, 2016. US Navy photo.

Aircraft carriers USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76) and USS John C. Stennis (CVN-74) are in the Philippine Sea rehearsing what Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson called “high-end warfighting.” Read More

SECDEF Carter: China Still Invited to RIMPAC 2016 Despite South China Sea Tension

SECDEF Carter: China Still Invited to RIMPAC 2016 Despite South China Sea Tension

An MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopter assigned to the Black Knights of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 4 operates near the Military Sealift Command hospital ship USNS Mercy (T-AH 19) and the People's Republic of China medical ship Peace Ark (T-AH 866) during a close formation of 42 ships and submarines from 15 international partner nations during Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2014. US Navy photo.

An MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopter assigned to the Black Knights of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 4 operates near the Military Sealift Command hospital ship USNS Mercy (T-AH 19) and the People’s Republic of China medical ship Peace Ark (T-AH 866) during a close formation of 42 ships and submarines from 15 international partner nations during Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2014. US Navy photo.

The United States has not revoked its invitation to China to participate in this year’s Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise despite increasingly aggressive behavior towards its neighbors in the South China Sea because the U.S. hopes China may still participate in a “system of cooperative nations,” Defense Secretary Ash Carter said April 15 aboard the aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis (CVN-74). Read More

Stennis, SPAWAR Prepare for First Carrier Deployment with Next Generation CANES Network

Stennis, SPAWAR Prepare for First Carrier Deployment with Next Generation CANES Network

As USS John C. Stennis has gone through its pre-deployment certifications and workups, it is the first carrier to do so using the CANES network environment. USNI News photo.

As USS John C. Stennis has gone through its pre-deployment certifications and workups, it is the first carrier to do so using the CANES network environment. USNI News photo.

Navy communications at sea will take a big leap forward in capability and capacity later this year. The service’s next-generation IT infrastructure, which promises faster connections and greater cyber security protections, will be tested and deployed for the first time on an aircraft carrier, USS John C. Stennis (CVN-74). Read More

Twenty Six US Navy Ship Naming Controversies

Twenty Six US Navy Ship Naming Controversies

In the late 18th and early 19th centuries, the U.S. Navy had no formal procedure for naming ships. It wasn’t until 1819 that Congress passed an act stating “all of the ships, of the Navy of the United States, now building, or hereafter to be built, shall be named by the Secretary of the Navy.” The secretary has fulfilled this role ever since, even though the passage expressly assigning authority for designating ship names was omitted when the U.S. Code was revised in 1925.

In addition to recommendations from Congress and the president, the secretary traditionally has been guided by a rather loose set of naming conventions—cruisers were to be named for battles, attack submarines for U.S. cities, destroyers for Navy and Marine heroes, and so forth. Controversy has erupted whenever the choice of a name strayed too far from those conventions, was seemingly swayed by politics, or deemed inappropriate for various reasons. Read More