Tag Archives: amphibious warfare

Naval Surface and Mine Warfighting Development Center's Role Evolving as Warfare Advocate, Trainer

Naval Surface and Mine Warfighting Development Center’s Role Evolving as Warfare Advocate, Trainer

Commander, Naval Surface and Warfighting Development Center Rear Adm. John Wade, left, speaks to Warfare Tactics Instructor (WTI) candidates after they completed their initial course of instruction – the Instructor and Tactics Course. Upon completion of the course, students will have to attend and pass advanced tactical training courses to earn WTI designation through one of three SMWDC Divisions – Amphibious Warfare, Sea Combat, or Integrated Air and Missile Defense. SMWDC is one of the Navy’s five Warfare Development Centers and fills an integral role in the Surface Force Strategy: Return to Sea Control. SMWDC’s mission is to increase the lethality and tactical proficiency of the surface force across all domains. US Navy Photo

When the U.S. Navy conducted strikes on Syrian targets last month, the Naval Surface and Mine Warfighting Development Center (SMWDC) was on hand to provide expertise on conducting high-end tactics in a complex environment. When U.S. Navy ships were targeted by Houthi anti-ship cruise missiles in October 2016, SMWDC swarmed in afterwards to understand what happened and how to learn from it. And when operators in the Mediterranean Sea needed additional protection from growing threats in the region, SMWDC experts joined an effort to help integrate the SeaRAM weapon system with ballistic missile defense destroyers and write the tactics and procedures so sailors could operate safely in the region. Read More

Neller: Future Marine Corps Could be an ‘Older, More Experienced’ Force

Neller: Future Marine Corps Could be an ‘Older, More Experienced’ Force

U.S. Marines with Headquarters and Service Company, 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, 3rd Marine Division, march on the pier towards the amphibious assault ship USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD-6) in Okinawa, Japan, Feb. 1, 2018. USMC Photo

SAN DIEGO, Calif. — The Marine Corps has a long, storied history as a formidable – and young – fighting organization. But will the future force that must lean on highly-skilled, technical warfighters expert in areas like cyberspace, electronic warfare and information warfare require an older, more seasoned force?

The answer, according to the top Marine, might be yes. Read More

Navy, Marines Ponder Alternative Platforms' Role as First ESB Now Operating in 5th Fleet

Navy, Marines Ponder Alternative Platforms’ Role as First ESB Now Operating in 5th Fleet

AH-1 Cobra and UH-1 Huey helicopters assigned to Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron (VMM) 161 (Reinforced) land on the flight deck of the expeditionary mobile base USS Lewis B. Puller (ESB 3) in support of Alligator Dagger 2017. Alligator Dagger is a dedicated, unilateral combat rehearsal led by Naval Amphibious Force, Task Force 51, 5th Marine Expeditionary Brigade. Combined Navy and Marine Corps units of the America Amphibious Ready Group and embarked 15th Marine Expeditionary Units are to practice, rehearse and exercise integrated capabilities that are available to U.S. Central Command, both afloat and ashore. US Navy photo.

ANNAPOLIS, Md. — The Navy and Marine Corps are committed to using alternative platforms to move Marines around at sea, but there are still decisions yet to be made about how to maximize these ships’ effectiveness and minimize risk while operating independently or as part of a strike group. Read More

Amphibious Warfare Leaders Warn Against Buying Light Carriers Instead of Amphibs

Amphibious Warfare Leaders Warn Against Buying Light Carriers Instead of Amphibs

US Marine Sgt. Maj. Allen Goodyear, the squadron sergeant major for Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 211, Marine Aircraft Group 13, 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing, signals for an F-35B Lightning II to take off from the flight deck of the USS Essex (LHD-2) during Exercise Dawn Blitz. US Marine Corps Photo

The Navy’s director of amphibious warfare warned that pursuing a light aircraft carrier option in lieu of amphibious assault ships would limit the Marines’ options for responding to operational commanders’ needs, and instead urged faster shipbuilding and experimenting with new ship groupings to increase operational flexibility. Read More

CMC Neller Wants More Cyber, Intel and Electronic Warfare Marines

CMC Neller Wants More Cyber, Intel and Electronic Warfare Marines

Gen. Robert B. Neller, Commandant of the Marine Corps, speaks with a group of Marines from Marine Forces Reserve on Aug. 24, 2016. US Marine Corps Photo

Gen. Robert B. Neller, Commandant of the Marine Corps, speaks with a group of Marines from Marine Forces Reserve on Aug. 24, 2016. US Marine Corps Photo

Washington, D.C. – If an additional 3,000 Marines Congress has authorized for the U.S. Marine Corps gets approved, that end-strength will be routed to emerging cyber, intelligence and electronic warfare missions, the service’s top officer said on Wednesday. Read More

Marines Practice Expeditionary Advance Base Operations In Exercise Blue Chromite In Japan

Marines Practice Expeditionary Advance Base Operations In Exercise Blue Chromite In Japan

161031-N-XM324-095 WATERS OUTSIDE OKINAWA (Oct. 31, 2016) Marines, assigned to 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, attach a Humvee to a CH-53E Super Stallion helicopter, assigned to the 1st Marine Aircraft Wing, from the flight deck of the amphibious transport dock ship USS Green Bay (LPD 20) during Blue Chromite. Blue Chromite is a U.S.-only exercise, which strengthens the Navy-Marine Corps expeditionary, amphibious rapid-response capabilities based in Okinawa, Japan and the greater Indo-Asia-Pacific region. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Patrick Dionne/Released)

Marines assigned to 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment attach a Humvee to a CH-53E Super Stallion helicopter on the flight deck of amphibious transport dock USS Green Bay (LPD-20) on Oct. 31 during Blue Chromite. US Navy photo.

Amphibious forces in the Pacific practiced a “back to the future” tactic of seizing advance naval bases and conducting maneuver warfare during exercise Blue Chromite in Okinawa, Japan, exercise leaders told USNI News. Read More

Interview: CMC Neller Lays Out Path To Future U.S. Marine Corps

Interview: CMC Neller Lays Out Path To Future U.S. Marine Corps

Gen. Robert B. Neller steps out of a UH-1 Huey to talk with Marines Nov. 23 2015 at the Camp Hansen Theater, Camp Hansen, Okinawa. US Marine Corps Photo

Gen. Robert B. Neller steps out of a UH-1 Huey to talk with Marines Nov. 23, 2015 at the Camp Hansen Theater, Camp Hansen, Okinawa. US Marine Corps Photo

Gen. Neller is speaking today at the Center for Strategic and International Studies as part of the U.S. Naval Institute – CSIS Maritime Security Dialogue.

THE PENTAGON – Commandant of the Marine Corps Gen. Robert Neller said the service has a lot to be proud of today: amid flat funding levels, the Marines are building back readiness, deploying forces at as high a tempo as any time in recent memory, and replacing nearly all its types of aircraft and some ground vehicles with newer and more capable platforms.

And yet, sitting in his Pentagon office, Neller said he couldn’t let that be good enough. Read More

One Year In: Naval Surface and Mine Warfighting Development Center's Early Accomplishments

One Year In: Naval Surface and Mine Warfighting Development Center’s Early Accomplishments

Rear Adm. Jim Kilby, commander of Naval Surface and Mine Warfighting Development Center (SMWDC), congratulates graduates of the first Amphibious Warfare Tactics Instructor course. US Navy photo.

Rear Adm. Jim Kilby, commander of Naval Surface and Mine Warfighting Development Center (SMWDC), congratulates graduates of the first Amphibious Warfare Tactics Instructor course. US Navy photo.

One year ago the Naval Surface and Mine Warfighting Development Center (SMWDC) stood up to develop Warfare Tactics Instructors – highly trained operators with a good tactical understanding of their warfare mission area, who could go out and teach the rest of the fleet. It was the surface community’s Top Gun, in essence. Read More