Tag Archives: al qaeda

Opinion: The Strategic Impact of Trump’s Executive Orders and Actions

Opinion: The Strategic Impact of Trump’s Executive Orders and Actions

ISIS forces in Iraq

ISIS forces in Iraq

CORRECTION: The following piece was mislabeled as an analysis piece rather than opinion.

President Donald Trump signed an executive order last week that bars citizens from Iran, Iraq, Sudan, Libya, Yemen, Somalia and Syria from entering the United States for 90 days, suspends refugee admission programs for 120 days and indefinitely bans Syrian refugees. Many questions have been raised about this controversial executive action. Since this action is characterized as a national security measure, this analysis will examine two questions: first, will such a policy measurably contribute to U.S. national security interests at home and abroad? And second, why the sudden change in strategy? Read More

ISIS Brutality Rooted in an Apocalyptic Vision

ISIS Brutality Rooted in an Apocalyptic Vision

Undated photo of ISIS fighters.

Undated photo of ISIS fighters.

The extreme radical beliefs and brutal actions that caused al Qaeda in Iraq to fail earlier remain the heart of the success of today’s Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS or ISIL), all because the political context of a decade ago and today have changed, a leading scholar on Islamic terrorism said Monday. Read More

Panel: U.S. Needs to Rethink Strategy to Defeat Radical Islam

Panel: U.S. Needs to Rethink Strategy to Defeat Radical Islam

ISIS fighters in Iraq. Reuters Photo

ISIS fighters in Iraq. Reuters Photo

Fourteen years after the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on the Pentagon and the World Trade Center the U.S. still has “no comprehensive strategy to defeat radical Islam” in Yemen, Iraq, Syria or any other place,” one of the key figures in the development of the 2007 surge strategy in Iraq said Thursday at the American Enterprise Institute during a roll out of a new report from the think tank. Read More

Panel: Shifts in Saudi Leadership Raise Questions of Stability

Panel: Shifts in Saudi Leadership Raise Questions of Stability

US Secretary of State John Kerry meets with the late King of Saudi Arabia, Abdullah bin Abdulaziz Al Saud who died in early 2015. US State Department Photo

US Secretary of State John Kerry meets with the late King of Saudi Arabia, Abdullah bin Abdulaziz Al Saud who died in early 2015. US State Department Photo

The late April shuffling of the line of succession to the Saudi Arabian throne, plus a major shift in ministers of defense and foreign affairs, raised a number of questions about stability in the kingdom, continuing sectarian warfare in the Middle East, a new arms race in the region and future energy prices. Read More

From the East India Company to Disney to the Cola Wars: A Brief Collection of Non-State Navies

From the East India Company to Disney to the Cola Wars: A Brief Collection of Non-State Navies

Ships on the high seas can largely be split between two major caregories, merchant ships that connect countries through commerce and national navies formed to ensure that trade continues to flow.

However, in the margins between those two broad groups are fleets that have sought to influence international policy and politics independent of a national flag — non-state navies. Read More

Panel: ISIS, Al Qaeda Franchising Efforts Changed the Face of Terrorism

Panel: ISIS, Al Qaeda Franchising Efforts Changed the Face of Terrorism

Members of the hardline al Shabaab Islamist rebel group hold their weapons in Somalia’s capital Mogadishu, January 1, 2010. Somalia’s hardline Islamist rebel group al Shabaab said on Friday it was ready to send reinforcement to al Qaeda in Yemen should the U.S. carry out retaliatory strikes, and urged other Muslims to follow suit. Reuters Photo

Creating franchises among groups claiming affiliation with al Qaeda or the so-called Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) is among the biggest change in international terrorism, two leading experts told the Atlantic Council on Thursday. Read More

Opinion: The End of America’s War in Afghanistan?

Opinion: The End of America’s War in Afghanistan?

General John Campbell, commander of NATO-led International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) on Dec. 28, 2014. via Reuters

General John Campbell, commander of NATO-led International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) on Dec. 28, 2014. via Reuters

All Americans remember where they were when they learned about the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, but few Americans noticed—and fewer seemed to care—when Gen. John Campbell rolled up the International Security Afghanistan Force (ISAF) battle flag on Dec. 28. That ceremonial act officially and symbolically ended the ISAF combat mission in Afghanistan. Read More