Category Archives: U.S. Navy

Update: Shutdown's Impact on the Pentagon.

Update: Shutdown’s Impact on the Pentagon.

THIS POST HAS BEEN UPDATED TO INCLUDE A TRANSCRIPT OF THE PRESS CONFERENCE. The following is a Oct. 17, 2013 Pentagon press briefing on the impact of the government shutdown on the military with Secretary of of Defense Chuck Hagel and Pentagon comptroller Robert Hale. Read More

Navy Will Not Demolish D.C. Navy Yard Shooting Site

Navy Will Not Demolish D.C. Navy Yard Shooting Site

 Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Metropolitan Police collect evidence at Building 197 on Sept. 18, 2013. US Navy Photo

Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Metropolitan Police collect evidence at Building 197 on Sept. 18, 2013. US Navy Photo

The Navy will not demolish the site of the Sept. 16 Washington, D.C. Navy Yard shooting, Navy officials told USNI News on Thursday.

Building 197 — headquarters of Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA) — has been shuttered since former Navy reservist Aaron Alexis’ rampage that killed 12 while the Navy assessed with what to do the building. Read More

Document: Congressional Research Service Virginia-class Submarine Report

Document: Congressional Research Service Virginia-class Submarine Report

From the Congressional Research Service Sept. 27, 2013 Virginia (SSN-774) Class Attack Submarine Procurement report: The Navy is proposing to defer to FY2015 the remaining $952.7 million of the procurement cost of the second boat requested for FY2014. This would divide the procurement funding for the boat between two fiscal years (FY2014 and FY2015)—a funding profile sometimes called split funding. Read More

Document: Congressional Research Service Navy Littoral Combat Ship Program Report

Document: Congressional Research Service Navy Littoral Combat Ship Program Report

From the Congressional Research Service Sept. 27, 2013 Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) report:The LCS program has become controversial due to past cost growth, design and construction issues with the lead ships built to each design, concerns over the ships’ ability to withstand battle damage, and concerns over whether the ships are sufficiently armed and would be able to perform their stated missions effectively. Some observers, citing one or more of these issues, have proposed truncating the LCS program to either 24 ships (i.e., stopping procurement after procuring all the ships covered under the two block buy contracts) or to some other number well short of 52. Other observers have proposed down selecting to a single LCS design (i.e., continuing production of only one of the two designs) after the 24th ship. Read More

Opinion: The Navy Has Long History of Anti-Piracy Operations

Opinion: The Navy Has Long History of Anti-Piracy Operations

Lt. Stephen Decatur with the crew of USS Enterprise on Dec 23, 1803, in a painting by Dennis Malone Carter.

Lt. Stephen Decatur with the crew of USS Enterprise on Dec 23, 1803, in a painting by Dennis Malone Carter.

In the early years of this nation, President Thomas Jefferson found himself involved in one of the first conflicts overseas in the First Barbary War.

Jefferson, one of the first true isolationists, was reluctant to deploy forces in foreign engagements. However, faced with the demanding security of our merchant fleet and the growing concerns regarding our fragile economy, Jefferson had no choice but to protect the free flow of commerce and deploy the Navy. Read More

Pentagon Faces its own Debt Ceiling Crisis

Pentagon Faces its own Debt Ceiling Crisis

Pentagon comptroller Robert Hale

Pentagon comptroller Robert Hale

If the debt ceiling is not raised there would be delays in paying salaries even to the military and recalled Pentagon employees, as well as meeting obligations to contractors—from shipyards to health care providers, the Pentagon comptroller warned Thursday.

Although the hearing of the House Armed Services Readiness Subcommittee had been called primarily to learn why the Department of Defense (DoD) did not recall all its workers, Robert Hale said the debt ceiling problem “is a very different kind of situation” from the one faced during the shutdown. Read More

Astronaut Scott Carpenter was 'Trying to Defend the Planet'

Astronaut Scott Carpenter was ‘Trying to Defend the Planet’

Scott Carpenter

Scott Carpenter

Scott Carpenter was one the original Mercury 7 astronauts and a former Naval aviator. Carpenter died on Thursday. He was 88. The following was a 2001 interview in Naval History magazine.

In his Aurora 7 spacecraft on 24 May 1962, one of the original Mercury 7 space pioneers became the second American to orbit the Earth. After a rather rocky flight, overshooting his splashdown target by 250 miles, he was assigned to monitor the design and development of the lunar module for the Apollo project. He then took leave from the space program in the spring of 1965 to serve as an aquanaut in the U.S. Navy’s SeaLab II project, spending 30 days 205 feet below the surface off the coast of La Jolla, California. “The first person to explore both of humanity’s great remaining frontiers” talked recently with Naval History editor Fred L. Schultz between sessions of a Naval Forces Under the Sea symposium sponsored by the Office of Naval Research and the U.S. Naval Academy. Read More

Raytheon Wins Next-Generation Navy Radar Contract

Raytheon Wins Next-Generation Navy Radar Contract

An artist's conception of the Air Missile Defense Radar (AMDR). Raytheon Photo

An artist’s conception of the Air Missile Defense Radar (AMDR). Raytheon Photo

Raytheon has won a $386 million contract for the Navy’s next-generation Air and Missile Defense Radar (AMDR), officials with Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA) told USNI News on Thursday.

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