Category Archives: Surface Forces

Document: Littoral Combat Ship Manning Concepts

Document: Littoral Combat Ship Manning Concepts

From the July 2013 Office of Chief of Operations (OPNAV) report — Littoral Combat Ship Manning Concepts:

Based on current analysis and lessons learned from FREEDOM’s deployment, LCS will be configured to support up to 98 total personnel, to include core crew, Mission Package detachment, and aviation detachment. Projected costs to modify ships to accommodate this manning level are $600,000 for LCS-3 and $700,000 for LCS-4. Projected design and engineering costs for future ships are estimated at $6 million for both LCS variants. The costs to modified follow on ships will be addressed in future budgets.

Manpower and workload analyses of FREEDOM’s eight-month deployment to the Western Pacific will continue through her deployment. Finally,Navy Manpower Analysis Center will conduct a study aboard FREEDOM in early 2014 to support the development of the LCS Ship’s Manpower Document (SMD) which will further codify manpower requirements and policies and validate crew size, crew rotation construct, and associated shore manpower required to operate and support the LCS class. Read More

A Brief History of Naval Wargames

A Brief History of Naval Wargames

navalwargamesFor more than 100 years, the U.S. Navy has simulated naval warfare with simulations, or games. As far back as the 19th century the Navy recognized that gaming and simulations are an inexpensive and bloodless way to learn lessons that typically are imparted only during wartime.

The use of games traditionally has had multiple purposes. The foremost is to train for war. Simulating warfare gives those involved the closest possible experience they can have to actual warfare, thus giving them a modicum of experience under fire. It is an inexpensive way to train without the expense of taking ships and aircraft to sea, particularly in periods of austerity. Read More

Search Suspended for Two Missing Crew from Red Sea Knighthawk Crash

Search Suspended for Two Missing Crew from Red Sea Knighthawk Crash

 MH-60S Knighthawk from Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 28 departs the flight deck of the amphibious assault ship USS Kearsarge (LHD-3) in January.

MH-60S Knighthawk from Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 28 departs the flight deck of the amphibious assault ship USS Kearsarge (LHD-3) in January.

The Navy has suspended the search for two crewmembers lost following the crash of a MH-60S Knighthawk helicopter on Sunday in the Red Sea, according to a Monday release from U.S. 5th Fleet.

“Navy officials have concluded that given the time elapsed since the incident, aircrew survivability was extremely unlikely,” according to the statement. “The location of the crash site is known, and an extensive area has been searched multiple times by various ships and aircraft.” Read More

Opinion: Navy's Littoral Combat Ship Challenges the Status Quo

Opinion: Navy’s Littoral Combat Ship Challenges the Status Quo

USS Freedom (LCS 1) gets underway. Freedom is underway as part of the Republic of Singapore Navy's Western Pacific Multi-lateral Sea Exercise (WMSX). US Navy Photo

USS Freedom (LCS 1) gets underway. Freedom is underway as part of the Republic of Singapore Navy’s Western Pacific Multi-lateral Sea Exercise (WMSX). US Navy Photo

The world is a dynamic and uncertain place where threats can come from anywhere. Accordingly, the U.S. Navy’s missions have evolved to include defeating terrorists, pirates and illegal traffickers; preparing to counter mines and armed small boats; providing humanitarian assistance and disaster relief; and building partnerships to take on maritime-security missions. Read More

Diplomatic Solution to Syria's Chemical Weapons will not be Easy

Diplomatic Solution to Syria’s Chemical Weapons will not be Easy

UN chemical weapon inspectors

UN chemical weapon inspectors

After a major chemical attack in the Ghouta area of Damascus, Syria, the United States and many of its allies struggled to find a response. Attempting to enforce its “red line”, America sought to conduct a series of limited strikes against the Syrian regime to deter future chemical warfare and degrade its capability to conduct it.

Yet steadfast allies such as Britain balked at attack, while the domestic outcry at home force the administration of President Barack Obama into requesting a vote on an authorization for the use of military force (AUMF)—which stood little chance of passing in Congress. Read More

CNO: Navy Needs to Reshuffle $ 2 billion to Cover O&M and Shipbuilding Accounts

CNO: Navy Needs to Reshuffle $ 2 billion to Cover O&M and Shipbuilding Accounts

Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert testifies before the House Armed Services Committee on Sept. 18, 2013. US Navy Photo

Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert testifies before the House Armed Services Committee on Sept. 18, 2013. US Navy Photo

Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert informally asked the House Armed Services Committee (HASC) for authority to shuffle $ 2 billion in Navy funds to shore up gaps in maintenance, operations and procurement the service would suffer in Fiscal Year 2014 under the current sequestration cuts, Greenert said as part of his testimony before the HASC on Wednesday. Read More

Mabus Orders Immediate Review of Navy and Marine Base Security

Mabus Orders Immediate Review of Navy and Marine Base Security

Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus interviewed by reporters near the Washington Navy Yard on Sept. 16, 2013. US Navy Photo

Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus interviewed by reporters near the Washington Navy Yard on Sept. 16, 2013. US Navy Photo

Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus has kicked off two separate reviews of Navy and Marine Corps installation security following the Monday shooting at the Washington Navy Yard, a defense official told USNI News on Tuesday.

The first review will, “insure physical security standards are in place and are being maintained,” at Department of the Navy bases around the world, the official said.

Read More

Pentagon: Destroyers to Stay Near Syria During Chemical Weapon Negotiations

Pentagon: Destroyers to Stay Near Syria During Chemical Weapon Negotiations

USS Barry (DDG 52) is underway in the Mediterranean Sea on June 16, 2013. US Navy Photo

USS Barry (DDG 52) is underway in the Mediterranean Sea on June 16, 2013. US Navy Photo

The Department of Defense will leave four destroyers in the eastern Mediterranean and the Nimitz carrier strike group (CSG) in the Red Sea while the U.S. continues negotiations over Syria’s chemical weapons stockpile, a Pentagon spokesman told reporters on Thursday.

“We have no plans at this time to change our military posture in the Mediterranean,” Pentagon spokesman George Little told reporters. “We’re prepared for any potential military contingencies that might involve Syria.” Read More