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Navy, Coast Guard Searching for Missing USS Normandy Sailor off North Carolina

USS Normandy (CG-60) and the guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG-99) on Sept. 23, 2014. US Navy Photo

Six ships and Navy aircraft are searching for a USS Normandy (CG-60) sailor who went overboard Tuesday during a training exercise off the coast of North Carolina, the service announced on Wednesday morning.

Carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72), U.S. Coast Guard medium endurance cutter USCGC Forward (WMEC-911), destroyers USS Bainbridge (DDG-96), USS The Sullivans (DDG-68) and USS Mason (DDG-87) are searching for the missing sailor who fell overboard Normandy at about 3 p.m. EST, according to the statement from U.S. Fleet Forces Command.

“The sailor’s next of kin has been made aware of the incident and is being provided updates on the ongoing search and rescue operation,” read the statement.
“Our thoughts remain with the Normandy family and we will continue to provide updates as they become available.”

The following is the complete June 7, 2017 statement on the missing USS Normandy sailor.

A search and rescue effort is underway for a USS Normandy (CG 60) Sailor who went overboard at approximately 3 p.m. local yesterday. The ship was conducting independent training approximately 80nm off the coast of North Carolina at the time of the incident.

Aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72), U.S. Coast Guard medium endurance cutter USCGC Forward (WMEC 911), along with [Arleigh] Burke-class Aegis guided missile destroyers USS Bainbridge (DDG 96), USS The Sullivans (DDG 68) and USS Mason (DDG 87) are currently on station to join USS Normandy in the ongoing search efforts. Navy fixed and rotary wing aircraft are also currently assisting in the operation.

The Sailor’s next of kin has been made aware of the incident and is being provided updates on the ongoing search and rescue operation. Command leadership is in contact with Normandy families to make them aware of the incident as well. Our thoughts remain with the Normandy family and we will continue to provide updates as they become available.

  • Paul 2

    That is quite a search effort. If he had a PFD on, he’s findable by that group.

    • SpaceHoosier

      If he’s a sailor, he knows his pants, shirt or even his cover can be a PFD. Prayers for him, his family and shipmates for a speedy and successful rescue.

      • muzzleloader

        I remember doing the dungaree float drill in basic 40 years ago. It was simple and I could still do it today if I had to. Prayers for this young man and his family.

        • Kim Stickell

          I remember doing the blow up the jeans drill every year at summer camp in swim class.

      • Ed L

        I think the only reason they didn’t find he by now Is that he bounced off something on the way down. Majority of those that go over board are found within minutes unless they hit the water wrong or a lifeline, etc. Was he wearing a tool belt?

  • Ed L

    out of the 5 ships I served on, I remember only one man overboard during the daytime. sea state was about 5, We spotted him immediately after he surface. good thing he was wearing a white T- shirt. which was standing out against sea. We were getting ready to launch the Whale Boat when the ANGEL showed up from the Carrier. The kid was smart, got rid of his steel toes and did his pants into floats. Came back aboard in his skives He was really lucky he was not seriously injured or knocked unconscious. My 3rd Class from a height of almost 50 feet into the sea.

  • Curtis Conway

    I wonder if the sailor was wearing that blue camo uniform that makes it IMPOSSIBLE to see you in the water. Way to go US Navy. We have been warning about this for some time.

  • publius_maximus_III

    Hope they find him or her. Drownproofing was a required course when I attended college. You could survive for days without a life preserver if need be.

    • Curtis Conway

      How many times did we save “Oscar” when I was on board the cruiser? Every time we got underway. By the time we would get back to a live Oscar, he was floating with his pants blown up like a life preserver around his neck. What changed? Wonder if they still do that? I guess things aboard ship like MOB, and are no longer Simple, and they now we own the Last ‘S’ in KISS.

      • publius_maximus_III

        I recall their mentioning an OSCAR drill in last year’s big-to-do in the RIMPAC meet, so apparently still being done, but perhaps not as routinely as your CG days. Maybe ought to require everybody to wear one of those homing devices that activates on contact with water?

        • Curtis Conway

          If they are to keep wearing that stupid blue camo uniform on A MAN-O-WAR . . . at sea (?) . . . boggles the mind . . .!? Wastes money, and gets you killed too! Our dungarees were multi-functional, and the blue coveralls did fine too when underway in Condition III. Utility clothing, and what they are made of, has come a long way, but to DELIBERATELY camo someone, who is to perform all of their functions aboard ship, borders the delusional. Someone’s brother-in-law must be making these things.

          • publius_maximus_III

            Your comment made me wonder about something. How come we use the female pronouns “she” and “her” to describe a fighting ship, yet it is also known as a “Man-O-War”? Would seem that the seed for the current sexual confusion of our times was planted long ago…

      • Ctrot

        I recall my father’s BlueJackets Manual from 1943 showing how to turn pants into a life preserver.

  • Jen

    Just keep praying and positive thoughts his family are reading these comments.