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Raytheon to Manufacture Naval Strike Missile Launchers in Kentucky

A Kongsberg Naval Strike Missile (NSM) is launched from the littoral combat ship USS Coronado (LCS 4) during missile testing operations off the coast of Southern California in September 2014. US Navy photo.

A Kongsberg Naval Strike Missile (NSM) is launched from the littoral combat ship USS Coronado (LCS 4) during missile testing operations off the coast of Southern California in September 2014. US Navy photo.

LOUISVILLE, KY. – Raytheon is set to build launchers for the Kongsberg Naval Strike Missile at its facility where it constructs the SeaRAM and Phalanx close-in weapon systems, company officials told USNI News on Tuesday.

The NSM is one of three expected weapons to compete for the over the horizon missile program for the Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) and follow-on frigate program as well as the Navy’s Offensive Anti-Surface Warfare (OASuW) Increment 2.
The Navy test fired a NSM from Independence-class LCS USS Coronado (LCS-4) in 2014.
Lockheed Martin’s Long Range Anti-Ship Missile (LRASM) and a modified Boeing Harpoon anti-ship missile are also likely competitors for the OTH program.

An undated photo of a Kongsberg Naval Strike Missile in flight. Kongsberg Photo

An undated photo of a Kongsberg Naval Strike Missile in flight. Kongsberg Photo

Then Navy director of surface warfare Rear Adm. Peter Fanta told USNI News the service aimed to field the missile by the end of the year as part of the Navy’s distributed lethality push.

“I’m looking at a number of missiles – not just the Norwegian missile, I’m also looking at Harpoon and several other missiles. What bolts on, and what can I put on a console that has feeds from the combat system? … I’m trying to do that, again, if I can get enough engineering done to allow me to do this, I’m trying to do that this year,” Fanta said.
Last month, Raytheon announced the company had finalized a deal with Kongsberg to build the NSM in Tucson, Ariz.

  • disqus_zommBwspv9

    that is nice for the old place. 3 choices are shipping, Rail 10 meters away, Interstate 300 meters away and the Airport 300 meters away.

    • Andre

      And some wild turkeys in the bushes 😉

  • Dan Tootle

    Interesting choice of a manufacturer of these missile launching systems with Raytheon which typically manufactures the missiles that go into the launchers. Why the Navy turned away from Lockheed Martin that has been manufacturing the Vertical Launch Systems that are on every Navy frigate, destroyer, and cruiser (and many foreign navies as well) that are fully integrated into the shipboard weapons control systems is somewhat puzzling. The picture up until this announcement has been one of Raytheon missiles in LMSC launchers. Sometimes “if it ain’t broke why fix it?” just needs to be addressed and answered.

    • Rob C.

      Trying to get best deal i’d hope. I’d rather see them use more effective weapon. Lockheed’s weapon complete unknown (which isn’t bad thing) and Harpoon is bit too well know and nearly everyone has them. Which means they could be countered because how well know they are.

      Hoperfully best weapon is chosen. NSM certainly gets alot of press.

    • Beomoose

      The launchers they’re talking about in this release are the deck-mounted canisters NSM will use on LCS, not Mk41 VLS as built by Lockheed Martin. These are a proprietary Kongsberg design for their missile, and they picked Raytheon to be the US subcontractor to do DoD-friendly US manufacturing and development, so if the Navy is going to buy those launchers they’re doing business with those two companies. I’m sure LM is involved at the point of integration with their COMBATSS-21 system.

      Mk41 VLS integration of NSM is in Kongsberg’s plans but it remains to be seen if the USN is going that route or who will be involved. The Frigates are retired, and neither they nor the LCS have Mk41 fitted. The LCS-Frigate variant likely will not have Mk41 to start, though that remains to be settled. LockMart builds Mk41 itself, but the launch canisters which actually go into those VLS cells come from BAE. The Navy may indeed just forgo NSM-VLS in favor of a surface-launched LRASM (Lockheed) or an entirely new missile.