Tag Archives: NATO

Russia to France: Give Us the Mistrals or a Refund

Russia to France: Give Us the Mistrals or a Refund

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Mistral-class helicopter carrier Vladivostok via Reuters

Mistral-class helicopter carrier Vladivostok via Reuters

Russia has given the French government a choice, either deliver the two promised Mistral-class amphibious warships to the Russian Navy or refund the purchase price of the $1.53 billion program, a Russian foreign policy official told reporters on Monday. Read More

France Again Suspends Mistral Delivery, Russia Pledges to Sue

France Again Suspends Mistral Delivery, Russia Pledges to Sue

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Russian Mistral Vladivostok under construction on April 22, 2014. U.S. Naval Institute Combat Fleets of the World Photo

Russian Mistral Vladivostok under construction on April 22, 2014. U.S. Naval Institute Combat Fleets of the World Photo

The French government is suspending a deal to deliver two Mistral-class warships to the Russian Navy “until further notice” citing the ongoing conflict in Ukraine, according to a Tuesday statement from the office of President François Hollande. Read More

CNO Greenert: Russian Navy 'Very Busy in the Undersea Domain'

CNO Greenert: Russian Navy ‘Very Busy in the Undersea Domain’

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Photo from Audun Tholfsen and Yngve Kristoffersen of an alleged Russian ballistic missile submarine.

Photo from Audun Tholfsen and Yngve Kristoffersen of an alleged Russian ballistic missile submarine in the Arctic Circle on Oct. 16, 2014.

WASHINGTON, D.C. — The Russian Navy’s submarine force has been more active this year against the backdrop of soured relationships with the West over the ongoing internal conflicts in Ukraine and the forced annexation of Crimea by Russia, U.S. Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert said on Tuesday. Read More

Opinion: NATO's Maritime Future

Opinion: NATO’s Maritime Future

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USS Donald Cook (DDG 75) and the guided-missile frigate USS Taylor (FFG 50) participate in a bilateral underway engagement with Romanian ships, the frigate ROS Regina Maria (F 222) and the frigate ROS Marasesti (F 111) in the Black Sea in April 2014. US Navy Photo

USS Donald Cook (DDG 75) and the guided-missile frigate USS Taylor (FFG 50) participate in a bilateral underway engagement with Romanian ships, the frigate ROS Regina Maria (F 222) and the frigate ROS Marasesti (F 111) in the Black Sea in April 2014. US Navy Photo

The transatlantic alliance successfully navigated some rough seas in 2014. A year that began without any allied consensus on NATO’s proper direction in the world looks set to conclude with unanimity in the face of Russian President Vladimir Putin’s foray into Ukraine. Last month’s NATO summit in Wales especially seemed to prove that Europe still can give a good account of itself when necessary. Yet the hard work of follow-through on all the political commitments made there remains to be done, and the fundamental question raised by Russia’s belligerence—whether NATO will endure as a viable military entity—warrants close scrutiny in 2015. In no case more so than NATO’s maritime domain, where the Ukraine crisis prompted only slight adjustments at the same time it highlighted the need for a major course change. Read More

Opinion: A Mistral For Canada

Opinion: A Mistral For Canada

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Russian Mistral Vladivostok under construction on April 22, 2014. U.S. Naval Institute Combat Fleets of the World Photo

Russian Mistral Vladivostok under construction on April 22, 2014. U.S. Naval Institute Combat Fleets of the World Photo

The September decision by France to withhold delivery of two Mistral-class Landing Platforms Helicopter (LPH) building for Russia is an opportunity for NATO, the Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) and for the French shipbuilding industry and economy. France should not suffer economically for taking a stand against Russia’s aggression toward Ukraine. Rather, NATO, France and Canada can benefit if a little mutually beneficial creativity is applied.

While France desperately wants to complete the two amphibious warships — and get paid for them — NATO and Canada need the capabilities these ships can provide. Read More