Tag Archives: CRS

Document: Congressional Report on China Naval Modernization and Implications for U.S. Naval Forces

Document: Congressional Report on China Naval Modernization and Implications for U.S. Naval Forces

People's Liberation Army Navy carrier Liaoning.

People’s Liberation Army Navy carrier Liaoning.

The following is a from Feb. 28, 2014 report from the Congressional Research Service, China Naval Modernization: Implications for U.S. Navy Capabilities.
China is building a modern and regionally powerful Navy with a modest but growing capability for conducting operations beyond China’s near-seas region. The question of how the United States should respond to China’s military modernization effort, including its naval modernization effort, has emerged as a key issue in U.S. defense planning. The question is of particular importance to the U.S. Navy, because many U.S. military programs for countering improved Chinese military forces would fall within the Navy’s budget. Read More

Document: Major U.S. Arms Sales to Taiwan Since 1990

Document: Major U.S. Arms Sales to Taiwan Since 1990

An undated photo of ROC guided missile destroyer Makung (1805), a former US Navy Kidd-class destroyer.

An undated photo of ROC guided missile destroyer Makung (1805), a former US Navy Kidd-class destroyer.

The following is from the Congressional Research Service report, Taiwan: Major U.S. Arms Sales Since 1990.

This CRS Report discusses U.S. security assistance for Taiwan, formally called the Republic of China (ROC), particularly policy issues for Congress. It also lists sales of major defense articles and services to Taiwan, as approved by the President and notified to Congress since 1990. This report uses a variety of unclassified consultations and citations in the United States and Taiwan. Read More

Document: CRS on the Security Clearances Process

Document: CRS on the Security Clearances Process

From the Sept. 9, 2013 Congressional Research Service Report: Security Clearance Process: Answers to Frequently Asked Questions.

A security clearance is a determination that an individual—whether a direct federal employee or a private contractor performing work for the government—is eligible for access to classified national security information. A security clearance alone does not grant an individual access to classified materials. Rather, a security clearance means that an individual is eligible for access. In order to gain access to specific classified materials, an individual should also have a demonstrated “need to know” the information contained in the specific classified materials. Read More