Tag Archives: AFSB

Navy to Build CVN-79 in 2 Phases; Ditching Plans for Early AFSB-3 Procurement

Navy to Build CVN-79 in 2 Phases; Ditching Plans for Early AFSB-3 Procurement

A unit for the future aircraft carrier John F. Kennedy (CVN-79) rests on the assembly platen at Newport News Shipbuilding on March 5, 2014. US Navy Photo

A unit for the future aircraft carrier John F. Kennedy (CVN-79) rests on the assembly platen at Newport News Shipbuilding on March 5, 2014. US Navy Photo

In their first budget hearing of the year with the House Armed Services Committee (HASC), Navy officials described their Fiscal Year 2016 plans that include speeding up construction of the aircraft carrier USS John F. Kennedy (CVN-79) without changing its delivery date, hurrying to start the USS George Washington (CVN-73) Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH) planning to avoid problems down the road, and abandoning hopes of procuring a third Afloat Forward Staging Base early. Read More

NASSCO Awarded $498 Million for Second Afloat Forward Staging Base

NASSCO Awarded $498 Million for Second Afloat Forward Staging Base

The mobile landing platform Lewis B. Puller (T-MLP-3/T-AFSB-1) successfully completed launch and float-off at the General Dynamics National Steel and Shipbuilding Co. (NASSCO) shipyard on Nov. 6, 2014. US Navy Photo

The mobile landing platform Lewis B. Puller (T-MLP-3/T-AFSB-1) successfully completed launch and float-off at the General Dynamics National Steel and Shipbuilding Co. (NASSCO) shipyard on Nov. 6, 2014. US Navy Photo

General Dynamics NASSCO has been awarded a $498 million contract to build the fourth Mobile Landing Platform that will be the second configured as a so-called Afloat Forward Staging Base for mine countermeasure (MCM) helicopters and special operations forces (SOF) and U.S. Marines, the company announced on Monday. Read More

Updated: Keel Laid for First Dedicated Afloat Forward Staging Base

Updated: Keel Laid for First Dedicated Afloat Forward Staging Base

An artist's conception of the Afloat Forward Staging Base. USMC Photo

An artist’s conception of the Afloat Forward Staging Base. USMC Photo

Clarification: A previous version of this post included an out-of-date artist’s conception of the Lewis B. Puller.

General Dynamics NASSCO laid the keel for the U.S. Navy’s first dedicated design for an afloat forward staging base (AFSB) on Tuesday in the company’s San Diego, Calif. shipyard, according to the company. Read More

First Mobile Landing Platform to Arrive at Everett Friday for Trials

First Mobile Landing Platform to Arrive at Everett Friday for Trials

USNS Montford Point (T-MLP 1) is floated out of General Dynamics NASSCO shipyard on Nov. 12, 2013. US Navy Photo.

USNS Montford Point (T-MLP 1) is floated out of General Dynamics NASSCO shipyard on Nov. 12, 2012. US Navy Photo.

USNS Montford Point (MLP-1) has left NASSCO’s San Diego, Calif. shipyard to begin contract trials under the auspices of the Navy’s Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV), Military Sealift Command officials told USNI News on Thursday.

The first Mobile Landing Platform is expected to arrive Friday at Naval Station Everett, Wash. to conduct contract acceptance trails that will extend into September. Read More

Greenert and Amos Talk Future of Navy and Marine Corps

Greenert and Amos Talk Future of Navy and Marine Corps

Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert and Commandant of the Marine Corps Gen. James Amos speak at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) as part of their national defense speakers series on July 11, 2013. US Navy Photo

Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert and Commandant of the Marine Corps Gen. James Amos speak at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) as part of their national defense speakers series on July 11, 2013. US Navy Photo

The commandant of the Marine Corps and the chief of naval operations made the case for forward presence in an era of declining defense spending at a Washington to a national security forum think tank last week as events in Egypt threaten to spiral out of control.

Adm. Jonathan Greenert explained how the Navy and the Marine Corps can react quickly to situations citing the movement of USS Kearsarge (LHD-3) and USS San Antonio (LPD-17) into the Red Sea following the Egyptian military’s removal of President Mohamed Morsi from office as an immediate example of forward presence’s value and tailored forces. The ships were sent closer to the conflict, “because we don’t know what’s going to happen” in Egypt. “We can’t garrison and respond. It will be too late,” to handle a possible evacuation of Americans from the country, Greenert said. Read More

Document: Navy Ship Naming Conventions

Document: Navy Ship Naming Conventions

From June, 12 2013 Congressional Research Service report: Navy Ship Names

For ship types now being procured for the Navy, or recently procured for the Navy, naming rules can be summarized as follows: Read More

USS Anchorage Commissioned into Navy

USS Anchorage Commissioned into Navy

USS Anchorage during its May, 4 2013 commissioning ceremony. US Navy Photo

USS Anchorage during its May, 4 2013 commissioning ceremony. US Navy Photo

The Navy commissioned the seventh San Antonio-class amphibious war ship into the Fleet in a snowy Saturday ceremony in Alaska.

The 26,000 ton USS Anchorage (LPD-23) is the latest in the line of dock landing platform ships to enter the Fleet and one of 11 planned warships designed to ferry 720 Marines and their aircraft and landing craft around the world. Read More

Report: Lasers on U.S. Navy Ships

Report: Lasers on U.S. Navy Ships

The following is from the introduction to the Congressional Research Service’s April, 24 2013 report: Navy Shipboard Lasers for Surface, Air, and Missile Defense: Background and Issues for Congress.

Department of Defense (DOD) development work on high-energy military lasers, which has been underway for decades, has reached the point where lasers capable of countering certain surface and air targets at ranges of about a mile could be made ready for installation on Navy surface ships over the next few years. More powerful shipboard lasers, which could become ready for installation in subsequent years, could provide Navy surface ships with an ability to counter a wider range of surface and air targets at ranges of up to about 10 miles. These more powerful lasers might, among other things, provide Navy surface ships with a terminal-defense capability against certain ballistic missiles, including China’s new anti-ship ballistic missile (ASBM). Read More