Fourth Joint High Speed Vessel Completes Acceptance Trials

Fourth Joint High Speed Vessel Completes Acceptance Trials

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USS Coronado (LCS-4) and the joint high speed vessel USNS Millinocket (JHSV-3) on July 11, 2014. US Navy Photo

USS Coronado (LCS-4) and the joint high speed vessel USNS Millinocket (JHSV-3) on July 11, 2014. US Navy Photo

The fourth Austal USA Joint High Speed Vessel (JHSV) completed its Military Sealift Command (MSC) acceptance trials in the Gulf of Mexico, Naval Sea Systems Command announced on Friday. Read More

Navy Won’t Discuss LCS Follow-on Taskforce Results Until Next Budget

Navy Won’t Discuss LCS Follow-on Taskforce Results Until Next Budget

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The first of class littoral combat ships USS Freedom (LCS 1), rear, and USS Independence (LCS 2) maneuver together during an exercise off the coast of Southern California on May, 2 2012. US Navy Photo.

The first of class littoral combat ships USS Freedom (LCS 1), rear, and USS Independence (LCS 2) maneuver together during an exercise off the coast of Southern California on May, 2 2012.
US Navy Photo.

The results of the Navy taskforce for a follow-up hull to the Littoral Combat Ship are in, but the service will remain mum on the findings until they’re integrated into next year’s budget, the service said on Thursday. Read More

Document: Report to Congress On the Ohio Replacement Program

Document: Report to Congress On the Ohio Replacement Program

An undated artist's rendering of the Ohio Replacement. Naval Sea Systems Command Image

An undated artist’s rendering of the Ohio Replacement. Naval Sea Systems Command Image

The following is the July 18, 2014 Congressional Research Service report, Navy Ohio Replacement (SSBN[X]) Ballistic Missile Submarine Program: Background and Issues for Congress. Read More

The Legacy of USS Indianapolis

The Legacy of USS Indianapolis

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USS Indianapolis in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii in 1937. US Navy Photo

USS Indianapolis in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii in 1937. US Navy Photo

The following is a 1999 article from Proceedings, originally titled: The Sinking of the Indy & Responsibility of Command.

The July 30, 1945 sinking of the heavy cruiser USS Indianapolis (CA-35) by the Imperial Japanese submarine 1-58 has been called the last, great naval tragedy of World War II. It is the stuff of legend: after delivering the atomic bombs to Tinian, the Indy was torpedoed, sinking in 12 minutes. At least 800 crew members survived the sinking and went into the water. On their rescue after five days, only 320 still were alive. Their stories have inspired three books, a movie, and perhaps yet another feature film.  Read More